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Alessandro Nivola, Gemma Arterton Head Killer Cast For BBC One/FX 3-Part Adaptation Of Rumer Godden Steamy Lit Classic ‘Black Narcissus’

  • Deadline
Alessandro Nivola, Gemma Arterton Head Killer Cast For BBC One/FX 3-Part Adaptation Of Rumer Godden Steamy Lit Classic ‘Black Narcissus’
Exclusive: Alessandro Nivola and Gemma Arterton head a killer cast for a three-part adaptation of the 1939 classic Rumer Godden literary novel Black Narcissus, a tale of sexual repression and forbidden love. BAFTA-winning writer Amanda Coe wrote the three hourlong episodes and renowned Dp Charlotte Bruus Christensen makes her directing debut.

BBC One is producing with DNA TV and FX Productions. The exec producers are Andrew Macdonald, Allon Reich and Coe for DNA TV and FX Productions and Lucy Richer for the BBC. Filming starts in October in Jomsom, Nepal and Pinewood Studios, UK.

Black Narcissus was previously adapted for screen in 1947 by Powell and Pressburger and subsequently won two Oscars for Cinematography (Jack Cardiff) and Art Direction (Alfred Junge).

Arterton plays Sister Clodagh, the leader of the nuns of St Faiths, who travel to Nepal to
See full article at Deadline »

Arrow Video FrightFest announces 2019 Short Film Programme

  • Nerdly
From unseen forces to dangerous desires, from the remorseful living to the remorseless dead, from under the earth to creepy closed doors, Arrow Video FrightFest 2019 continues the festival’s fine tradition of showcasing the best in global genre short filmmaking. This year’s five continent selection unleashes the newest creations from both upcoming and established filmmakers and embraces a record fifteen UK films, seven spotlighted selections from Canada and a breakthrough entry from The United Arab Emirates.

Homegrown talent continues to energise the UK film industry, as reflected in this year’s entries. There’s Folk Horror and Body Horror, whilst lethal women lurk around every corner in Sleep Tight, Under The Parasol and Dog Skin. Katie Bonham returns with ticking terror thriller Midnight and Josefa Celestin is back with the darkly apocalyptic Tomorrow Might Be The Day. Another fearsome futuristic tale is Old Beginnings, while unseen danger lurks in
See full article at Nerdly »

Arrow Video FrightFest announces 2019 Short Film Programme

From unseen forces to dangerous desires, from the remorseful living to the remorseless dead, from under the earth to creepy closed doors, Arrow Video FrightFest 2019 continues the festival’s fine tradition of showcasing the best in global genre short filmmaking.

This year’s five continent selection unleashes the newest creations from both upcoming and established filmmakers and embraces a record fifteen UK films, seven spotlighted selections from Canada and a breakthrough entry from The United Arab Emirates.

Home-grown talent continues to energise the UK film industry, as reflected in this year’s entries. There’s Folk Horror and Body Horror, whilst lethal women lurk around every corner in Sleep Tight, Under The Parasol and Dog Skin. Katie Bonham returns with ticking terror thriller Midnight and Josefa Celestin is back with the darkly apocalyptic Tomorrow Might Be The Day. Another fearsome futuristic tale is Old Beginnings, while unseen danger lurks in
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Matthias Schoenaerts and Colin Firth in The Command Available on Blu-ray August 6th

An unbelievable, action-packed true story comes home when The Command arrives on Blu-ray Combo Pack (plus DVD and Digital), DVD, and Digital August 6 from Lionsgate.

An unbelievable, action-packed true story comes home when The Command arrives on Blu-ray Combo Pack (plus DVD and Digital), DVD, and Digital August 6 from Lionsgate. The film is currently available On Demand. Starring Matthias Schoenaerts, Léa Seydoux, and Academy Award® winner Colin Firth, don’t miss the riveting story about the 2000 nuclear submarine disaster based on Robert Moore’s book, A Time to Die, directed by award winner Thomas Vinterberg, and written by Robert Rodat. The Command Blu-ray Combo Pack and DVD will include the “Human Costs: Making The Command” featurette and will be available for the suggested retail price of $22.99 and $19.98, respectively.

Colin Firth stars in the unforgettable true story of the K-141 Kursk, a Russian flagship nuclear powered submarine that sank to the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

UK box office preview: Can 'Annabelle Comes Home', 'The Dead Don't Die' boost quiet-looking week?

UK box office preview: Can 'Annabelle Comes Home', 'The Dead Don't Die' boost quiet-looking week?
Other new openers include documentaries ’Armstrong’ and ’Pavarotti’, and Harry Wootliff’s debut feature ’Only You’.

It is a quiet week for new releases at the UK box office, with the top holdovers from last week likely to retain their places at the top of the chart.

Newcomers include Warner Bros’ horror sequel Annabelle Comes Home, the third entry in the successful franchise, which itself is a spin-off of The Conjuring series of films. Gary Dauberman directs the latest entry, which features Vera Farmiga in the cast. Farmiga appeared in the previous two Conjuring films and also stars in the upcoming sequel.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New Trailer For Submarine Thriller ‘Kursk’ With Colin Firth

Signature Entertainment has released a brand new trailer for the incoming Colin Firth-starring submarine thriller Kursk. I caught this film – based on a remarkable true story – at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival and I can totally recommend it.

Signature Entertainment

The film is based on the Kursk submarine tragedy of 2000 in which 118 men lost their lives, Kursk: The Last Mission, to give it its new full title, is a tense submarine thriller from critically-acclaimed director Thomas Vinterberg.

Here’s the official synopsis:

When a Russian naval exercise goes horribly wrong, the Kursk submarine erupts in flame killing most of the men onboard and sending the trapped survivors to the bottom of sea. Time is running out for Russian Captain Mikhail Averin (Matthias Schoenaerts) and his crew, as fire engulfs the vessel starving them of oxygen.

Ignoring the advice of their own people, the Russian government refuses the
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘The Command’ Review: An Examination of Negligence, Told Plainly and Mercilessly

In the summer of 2000, the Russian submarine named Kursk took on a naval exercise in the Barents Sea, the first of its kind since the fall of the Soviet Union a decade earlier. The Command (released under the title Kursk elsewhere), written by Robert Rodat and directed by Thomas Vinterberg, tells of the sub’s crew, the crew’s families and the government that failed them. Without fully spoiling this real-life event, things do not go well from those onboard the vessel.

As sub commander Mikhail (Matthias Schoenaerts) and his shipmates celebrate at their fellow soldier Pavel’s (Matthias Schweighöfer) wedding reception, the writing’s on the wall. Post-ussr Russia is floundering, wages are shrinking, and the military is energized only by principle. Speeches about duty and sacrifice underline what’s about to happen. Despite the relative modernity of this story (adapted from Robert Moore’s book A Time to Die
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Command’ Trailer: Matthias Schoenaerts, Colin Firth, and Léa Seydoux Encounter Disaster

Now with a new title for U.S. audiences, a new trailer has just arrived for The Command (originally called Kursk), which features a talented ensemble including Matthias Schoenaerts, Colin Firth, and Léa Seydoux in the lead roles. Directed by Thomas Vinterberg, the thriller follows the devastating true story of 23 sailors trying to survive the K-1412 Kursk submarine back in the year 2000.

Following its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival last year to solid, if reserved acclaim, The Command will arrive on DirecTV on May 23, and then a limited theatrical release will be happening starting June 21. See the trailer, synopsis, and poster below.

Colin Firth stars in the unforgettable true story of the K-1412 Kursk, a Russian flagship nuclear powered submarine that sank to the bottom of the Barents Sea in August 2000. As 23 sailors fought for survival aboard the disabled sub, their families desperately battled bureaucratic obstacles and
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘A Quiet Place’ interviews: John Krasinski, Emily Blunt and more exclusive chats [Watch]

‘A Quiet Place’ interviews: John Krasinski, Emily Blunt and more exclusive chats [Watch]
Can “A Quiet Place” become a rare horror film to compete for Best Picture at the Oscars? The box office sleeper hit about a family forced to live in silence to hide from monsters with super-sensitive hearing has earned nominations at the PGA, WGA, SAG, Golden Globe and Critics’ Choice Awards, so it’s frighteningly possible. Gold Derby recently spoke with director, star, and co-writer John Krasinski; actress Emily Blunt; screenwriters Bryan Woods and Scott Beck; producers Brad Fuller and Andrew Form; cinematographer Charlotte Bruus Christensen; and supervising sound editors Ethan Van der Ryn and Erik Aadahl about their work.

See As Oscar nominations voting enters final weekend, what films are on the bubble?

When Krasinski first read the spec script he “was holding a three-week-old girl reading about what you would do to protect your kids. Those early days of parenthood are genuinely terrifying. You are checking if they
See full article at Gold Derby »

Fox Searchlight’s ‘Tolkien’ Takes Early Summer Release Date

  • Deadline
Fox Searchlight’s Tolkien about the legendary Lord of the Rings author will open in theaters on May 10.

The movie, directed by Dome Karukoski, and starring Nicholas Hoult as J.R.R. Tolkien and Lily Collins as his muse and wife Edith Bratt, explores the formative years of the orphaned author as he finds friendship, love and artistic inspiration among a group of fellow outcasts at school. This takes him into the outbreak of World War I, which threatens to tear the “fellowship” apart. All of these experiences would inspire Tolkien to write his famous Middle-Earth novels.

David Gleeson and Stephen Beresford wrote Tolkien. Peter Chernin produces through his Chernin Entertainment label, with Jenno Topping, David Ready, and Kris Thykier.

Searchlight tends to plant a flag in the early summer specialty marketplace. We hear Tolkien, given the author’s mass appeal, will likely not be a platform release, rather potentially a wider
See full article at Deadline »

Oscar Experts’ top 7 Best Actress surprises to watch for: Toni Collette, Nicole Kidman, Carey Mulligan …

Oscar Experts’ top 7 Best Actress surprises to watch for: Toni Collette, Nicole Kidman, Carey Mulligan …
Oscar voting closed on Monday, January 14, so there’s no more changing minds. Que será, será. Whatever will be, will be. But the future is ours to see, dammit! For instance, the 31 Expert journalists we’ve polled have settled on the five likeliest nominees for Best Actress: front-runner Glenn Close (“The Wife”) followed by Olivia Colman (“The Favourite”), Lady Gaga (“A Star is Born“), Melissa McCarthy (“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”) and Yalitza Aparicio (“Roma”).

But is that lineup set in stone? As of this writing there are seven other women who are predicted to earn a bid by at least one Expert each. There are always surprises somewhere on the Oscar ballot, so keep an eye on these dark horse contenders.

Sign UPfor Gold Derby’s free newsletter with latest predictions

Emily Blunt, “Mary Poppins Returns“ (12 Experts) — Blunt is overdue for her first Oscar nomination, and this could be
See full article at Gold Derby »

"Nicolas Roeg was the greatest director I ever worked with," says producer Jeremy Thomas

Thomas also suggested the UK film establishment undervalued Roeg in his lifetime.

Award-winning UK producer Jeremy Thomas has paid heartfelt tribute to Nicolas Roeg, with whom he collaborated on films including Insignificance, Bad Timing and Eureka.

Roeg died aged 90 on Saturday (November 26).

“I will miss him forever. I had a 10-year lesson from him about everything,” said Thomas, speaking from Rome this weekend. “He was one of the greatest, if not the greatest, director I worked with and he left a legacy of magnificent films.”

As well as his directorial credits Thomas cited Roeg’s work as a cinematographer on
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Director Nicolas Roeg Dead At Age 90

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Nicolas Roeg, the supremely talented British cinematographer who ultimately became an acclaimed director, has died at age 90. Roeg's unique eye for filming scenes in a creative manner gained him a reputation in the movie industry  in the 1960s. He was a second-unit photographer on David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" and contributed to Lean's "Doctor Zhivago". By 1964, he was credited as Director of Photography on Roger Corman's "The Masque of the Red Death", one of the most stylishly filmed Corman horror productions. Soon, he found himself constantly in demand. Other films he photographed included "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum", "Far from the Madding Crowd" and "Petulia". He also contributed to the 1967 spoof version of "Casino Royale".

Roeg next moved into the Director's chair with the bizarre and controversial 1970 crime film "Performance" that has since become a cult classic. Better received was
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Rip Nicolas Roeg

  • SneakPeek
Director, cinematographer Nicolas Roeg, noted for the features "Don't Look Now", "The Man Who Fell To Earth" And "Performance" has died:

Roeg started out as an editing apprentice, then worked his way up to become a second unit Dp on director David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962)...

...followed by Roger Corman's "The Masque of the Red Death" (1964)...

...François Truffaut's "Fahrenheit 451" (1966)...

...John Schlesinger's "Far from the Madding Crowd" (1967)...

...and Richard Lester's "Petulia" (1968).

Roeg made his co-directing debut with "Performance" (1970)...

...then went to Australia to solo direct and film the classic "Walkabout" (1971) starring Jenny Agutter.

Throughout the 1970's, Roeg produced an impressive amount of work, including "Don't Look Now" (1973) starring Donald Sutherland...

....and "The Man Who Fell to Earth" (1976) starring David Bowie.

Click the images to enlarge and Sneak Peek the films of Nicolas Roeg...
See full article at SneakPeek »

An Appreciation of Nicolas Roeg: A Director Who Fragmented the World, Then Put It Back Together

  • Variety
An Appreciation of Nicolas Roeg: A Director Who Fragmented the World, Then Put It Back Together
The 1970s were the heyday of what was still known, with Victorian understatement, as the love scene: those writhing arenas of nude intimacy, which moviegoers experienced with a touch of voyeuristic awe, to the point that the scenes were talked about for years, or even decades. And except for the clashing close encounters in “Last Tango in Paris,” no love scene of the ’70s was as celebrated, as talked about, or as swooned over as the one that appeared a year later in “Don’t Look Now,” the splendidly creepy 1973 chiller that’s arguably the greatest movie directed by Nicolas Roeg, who died Friday at 90.

The film’s two stars, Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie, were both considered deliriously sexy at the time, though if you watch the movie today they look more or less like what they were playing — a handsome but ordinary middle-class couple still reeling in grief
See full article at Variety »

Nicolas Roeg dies at 90 by Jennie Kermode - 2018-11-24 17:05:31

Roeg's vision of Venice in Don't Look Now

Film fans have been paying tribute today to Nicolas Roeg, the director behind some of the 20th Century's most iconic films. The man behind Walkabout, Don't Look Now, The Man Who Fell To Earth and Performance (which he co-directed with Donald Cammell), he will be remembered as one of the greatest auteurs Britain has produced.

A Cbe and Fellow of the BFI, the London-born director was active in the industry for over six decades, releasing his last documentary, The Film That Buys the Cinema, in 2014. His last fiction film, Puffball, came out in 2007. Alongside directing, he won acclaim for his work as a cinematographer on films including Masque Of The Red Death, Fahrenheit 451, Lawrence Of Arabia and Far From The Madding Crowd. His own films often dealt with themes of death, grief, identity and mysticism.

"His films hypnotised me for years and still continue.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Nicolas Roeg Dies: Film Director For ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’ Was 90

  • Deadline
Nicolas Roeg Dies: Film Director For ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’ Was 90
Idiosyncratic film director Nicolas Roeg, whose odd but compelling films included Performance and The Man Who Fell To Earth, has died. He passed away on Friday night of undisclosed causes at age 90, according to his son.

Roeg’s work, which was often opaque and non-traditional, influenced a generation of filmmakers, but wasn’t widely accepted at first. Performance was almost not released, and later re-cut by Warner Bros., whose executives found it almost incomprehensible. It is now considered a classic, decades later.

Before directing, Roeg had built a solid reputation as a cinematographer, winning acclaim for his work on Far From The Madding Crowd and Fahrenheit 451, among others.

But it was his work on Performance that caused a stir. Co-directed with Donald Cammell, its non-linear narrative and dark tones recalled such auteurs as Jean-Luc Godard and Richard Lester. It became a signature piece, leading to such stylized and arty
See full article at Deadline »

Nicolas Roeg, Director of ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth,’ ‘The Witches,’ Dies at 90

  • Variety
Nicolas Roeg, Director of ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth,’ ‘The Witches,’ Dies at 90
Director and noted cinematographer Nicolas Roeg, whose offbeat films included “Performance,” “Don’t Look Now,” “The Witches” and “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” has died. He was 90.

His son Nicolas Roeg Jr. told the BBC his father died Friday night.

A daring and influential craftsman, Roeg’s idiosyncratic films influenced filmmakers including Danny Boyle and Steven Soderbergh.

He worked his way up from the bottom of the business and by the 1960s was much in demand as a cinematographer, responsible for the lensing of films including “Petulia,” “Far From the Madding Crowd” and “Fahrenheit 451.”

The controversial, oddly compelling Mick Jagger-starring “Performance,” which Roeg co-directed with Donald Cammell, was almost not released and then was recut by Warner Bros.; execs at the studio found it incomprehensible as a gangster thriller. It was eventually recut, released in 1970 to modest business and decades later received widespread acclaim as a classic of British cinema.
See full article at Variety »

R.I.P. Nicolas Roeg (1928 – 2018)

British filmmaker Nicolas Roeg, director of the BAFTA-nominated horror classic Don’t Look Now, has passed away aged 90, his family has revealed.

Born in London in 1928, Roeg began his career in the film industry as a clapper board operator before working in the camera department on a number of films, including Far From the Madding Crowd, Fahrenheit 451, Lawrence of Arabia, Doctor Zhivago and Casino Royale.

Roeg made his directorial debut with 1970’s Performance starring Mick Jagger, and followed this up with the critically acclaimed Walkabout (1971), hugely influential horror film Don’t Look Now (1972) and the David Bowie-headlined sci-fi The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976).

Roeg’s later credits included Bad Timing, Eureka, Aria, and the 1990 Roald Dahl adaptation The Witches, the latter of which was critically acclaimed but disappointed at the box office and proved to be his final studio film. He would however continue to direct a
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Nicolas Roeg, ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth’ Director, Dead at 90

Nicolas Roeg, ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth’ Director, Dead at 90
Nicolas Roeg, a visionary filmmaker whose enrapturing, sensuous movies transformed the way audiences and his fellow directors understood cinematic language, has died at the age of 90, his family confirmed to the BBC.

More concerned with blazing his own trail than catering to commercial concerns, Roeg created dramas that played with chronology and offended small-minded viewers, resulting in a body of work full of cult classics that were often rejected upon release, only to be reevaluated far more favorably in subsequent years as their pioneering qualities influenced future artists. In films such as Performance,
See full article at Rolling Stone »
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