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NYC Weekend Watch: Outsider Visions of America, Godard x Pasolini, Lucrecia Martel & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

“Another Country: Outsider Visions of America” offers films by Raúl Ruiz, Straub-Huillet, Wenders, Verhoeven and more.

Eternal Sunshine plays for free Friday night on Governor’s Island.

IFC Center

The rather staggering Abbas Kiarostami retrospective continues, with screenings of the Koker trilogy, Ten, Taste of Cherry, Certified Copy and more.



Metrograph
See full article at The Film Stage »

IFC Films Unlimited is Another New Streaming Service, But Can It Last?

Independent distributor IFC Films is poised to launch its own streaming service called IFC Films Unlimited, which will initially be accessible through Amazon Prime Video Channels. The service will include hundreds of movies, including The Babadook, The Trip, Y Tu Mama Tambien, Certified Copy, Gomorrah, and more. But even with its own impressive selection of acclaimed independent […]

The post IFC Films Unlimited is Another New Streaming Service, But Can It Last? appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

IFC Films Launches Subscription VOD Streaming Service

IFC Films is getting into the streaming game, launching its own subscription-based, video on demand streaming service on Thursday.

Called IFC Films Unlimited, the catalog of movies will draw on titles from the IFC Films, IFC Midnight and Sundance Select labels, including so far “Y Tu Mama Tambien,” “The Trip,” “45 Years,” “The Babadook” and more as part of an initial offering of several hundred movies.

The service launches today and will be available exclusively on Amazon Prime Video channels for $5.99 per month. The service hopes to eventually be available on additional platforms.

Also Read: 'The Sound of Silence' With Peter Sarsgaard and Rashida Jones Acquired By IFC Films

The launch was made to coincide with the Cannes Film Festival, taking place now. IFC has distributed five winners of the festival’s top prize, the Palme d’Or, and three of those movies, “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days,” “Dheepan
See full article at The Wrap »

The Best Romantic Comedies of the Last 10 Years — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday.

This week’s question: What is the best romantic comedy of the last 10 years?

Ken Bakely (@kbake_99), Freelance for Film Pulse

Perhaps its basis on real-life events goes some of the way in getting it there, but “The Big Sick” is a wonderfully affecting and funny movie, and one of the reasons it works is because of how well it examines its characters, their backgrounds, and their personalities. Romantic comedies are dependent on the strengths of how the characters are developed, and while co-writers Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani may have used autobiographical inspiration in setting the stage, their storytelling talents ensure that the film’s world is thoughtfully realized, richly textured, and fully coherent from start to finish. A superb cast, led by Nanjiani himself, rounds off the film’s
See full article at Indiewire »

Manhattan’s Beloved Lincoln Plaza Cinema Will Close for Good in January 2018

  • Indiewire
Update Below

Lincoln Plaza Cinema — the first stop for much acclaimed independent and foreign fare since 1981 — will shutter next month when its New York City lease ends, according to Deadline. Occupying an Upper West Side residential building’s basement, the six-screen theater has hosted exclusive engagements of films like “Fahrenheit 9/11” and “Certified Copy.” It is operated as a partnership between the founder of the former New Yorker Films distribution company, Dan Talbot; France’s Gaumont Film Company, a mini-major studio; and local real estate investment film Milstein Properties, the owner of the site.

Read More:Dan Talbot’s 2004 Gotham Awards Speech

Talbot’s wife of 68 years, Toby, told Deadline that they “did everything we could to ask for the lease to be extended,” to no avail, as Milstein is “looking to make money” and “get everything [they] can.”

Multiple sources told IndieWire that Howard Milstein, chairman of Milstein Properties, had been seeking
See full article at Indiewire »

The 20 Best Plot Twists of the 21st Century, Ranked

  • Indiewire
The 20 Best Plot Twists of the 21st Century, Ranked
It’s the shock of seeing Norman Bates, knife in hand, clad in his mother’s clothes, grinning maniacally in the swinging lamplight. It’s the realization that Kevin Spacey spun us a bunch of lies, and was actually Keyser Söze the whole time. It’s finally connecting “I see dead people” with Bruce Willis being shot at the beginning of “The Sixth Sense.” When movies pull the rug from under us, it’s one of the greatest thrills that cinema can provide.

As Hollywood continues to reboot countless old properties, it’s easy to think that the days of original and surprising storytelling are long behind us. But these films prove that Hollywood still has a few tricks up its sleeve, ones that have kept us talking for years, and have cemented their place in film history.

Beware of spoilers! Here are the best plot twists of the 21st
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Poster of the Week: The Posters of the 55th New York Film Festival

  • MUBI
Above: French poster for Let the Sun Shine In (Claire Denis, 2017, France).Seven years ago, when I did my first round-up of posters of the New York Film Festival, I led off with a Juliette Binoche poster (for Certified Copy) so it seems fitting to kick off again with this rapturous image of Binoche for Claire Denis’ Let the Sun Shine In. It may not be the best poster of the festival—though it’s not bad—but Binoche’s look of blissful abandon seems fitting as New York cinephiles head into another fortnight of cinematic nirvana.As usual I’ve tried to collect posters for all the films in the festival’s main slate, the only two I came up short on being Serge Bozon’s Mrs. Hyde and Chloé Zhao’s The Rider. The best poster of the festival might well be one of many designs for Lucrecia Martel
See full article at MUBI »

More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/).
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Abbas Kiarostami’s ’24 Frames’ Is A Moving Farewell From A Legendary Filmmaker — Cannes 2017 Report

Abbas Kiarostami’s ’24 Frames’ Is A Moving Farewell From A Legendary Filmmaker — Cannes 2017 Report
Abbas Kiarostami, the great Iranian postmodernist who died last summer at the age of 76, used to say that he preferred the kind of movies that put their audience to sleep. “Some films have made me doze off in the theater,” he would explain, “but the same films have made me stay up at night, wake up thinking about them in the morning, and keep on thinking about them for for weeks.” So while I passed out (and passed out hard) roughly 15 minutes into “24 Frames,” the fascinating, posthumously completed non-narrative project that will serve as Kiarostami’s final farewell, I suspect that he wouldn’t take my unconsciousness as a criticism or a show of disrespect.

On the contrary, I imagine that he would have been delighted to see the dozens of nodding heads that dotted the film’s final Cannes screening, where the narcotic quality of Kiarostami’s cinema was
See full article at Indiewire »

Juliette Binoche and Her Daughter Get Pregnant in Trailer for French Comedy ‘Baby Bump(s)’

When she’s not working with the greatest auteurs in world cinema, Juliette Binoche is letting loose and exercising her comedic muscles — at least, if this trailer for an upcoming French comedy is any indication. Telle mère, telle fille aka Baby Bump(s) finds the Certified Copy actress as a mother who gets pregnant at the same time as her daughter, and wackiness ensues.

Also starring Camille Cottin, Lambert Wilson, and Catherine Jacob, it comes from co-writer/director Noémie Saglio and there’s no word if we’ll even see it pop up in the United States. Set for a release in France at the end of this month, it’s entertaining enough to see Binoche enjoying herself in this comedic playing field. Check out the trailer below and although there are no hardcoded subtitles, you can get a translation by clicking “Cc” then in settings, choosing the language of your choice.
See full article at The Film Stage »

How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love Sundance Hype

How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love Sundance Hype
I vividly remember the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, even though I was 2,000 miles away when it happened. That was the year “Beasts of the Southern Wild” premiered to the kind of rapturous response that’s usually reserved for new popes or Marvel trailers. The reviews were ecstatic, and on Twitter critics were falling over themselves to declare the movie a milestone in the history of independent cinema. I couldn’t wait to see it.

And then I did.

That’s when I decided that I had to go to Sundance for myself, that I had to vet these films first-hand. I was fascinated by the disconnect. I had big questions. Was the air in Park City as thin as they say? Why do Sundance films always seem to get over-hyped while Cannes films always seem to get under-hyped? (I’ll never forgive the shrugged response to “Certified Copy.”)

And then, on
See full article at Indiewire »

Berlin sets competition, adds Amazon and BBC drama premieres

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin sets competition, adds Amazon and BBC drama premieres
Stanley Tucci, Catherine Deneuve dramas join competition; TV dramas and Oleg Sentsov doc set to get world premiere.

The Berlin International Film Festival has finalised its competition and Berlinale Special strands.

Joining the festival in Out Of Competition berths are Stanley Tucci-directed Final Portrait and Catherine Deneuve drama Sage Femme.

James Gray’s The Lost City Of Z will have its interntional premiere while documentary The Trial: The State of Russia vs Oleg Sentsov will have its world premiere.

Among TV world premieres are Amazon’s Patriot and BBC One’s SS-gb.

In total, 18 of the 24 films selected for Competitionwill be competing for the Golden and the Silver Bears. 22 of the films will have their world premieres at the festival.

For the third time, Berlinale Special Series will present a selection of TV series in the official programme. Six German and international productions will have their world premieres at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele this year
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin finalises competition, adds TV premieres

  • ScreenDaily
Berlin finalises competition, adds TV premieres
Stanley Tucci, Catherine Deneuve dramas join competition; TV dramas and Oleg Sentsov doc set to get world premiere.

The Berlin International Film Festival has finalised its competition and Berlinale Special strands.

Joining the competition are

18 of the 24 films selected for Competition will be competing for the Golden and the Silver Bears. 22 of the films will have their world premieres at the festival.

The Berlinale Special will present recent works by contemporary filmmakers, documentaries, and extraordinary formats, as well as brand new series from around the world.

Berlinale Special Galas will be held at the Friedrichstadt-Palast and Zoo Palast. Other Special premieres will take place at the Kino International. Moderated discussions will follow the screenings at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele.

For the third time, Berlinale Special Series will present a selection of TV series in the official programme. Six German and international productions will have their world premieres at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele this year. Audiences
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New to Streaming: ‘Cameraperson,’ ‘Aquarius,’ ‘Christine,’ ‘It Follows,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Aquarius (Kleber Mendonça Filho)

The staggeringly accomplished debut feature by Brazilian critic-turned-director Kleber Mendonça Filho, Neighboring Sounds, announced the arrival of a remarkable new talent in international cinema. Clearly recognizable as the work of the same director, Mendonça’s equally assertive follow-up, Aquarius, establishes his authorial voice as well as his place as one of the most eloquent filmic commentators on the contemporary state of Brazilian society. – Giovanni M.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Q&A with If There’S A Hell Below Writer/Director Nathan Williams

  • DailyDead
"Two strangers are about to meet. In one hour, one of them will be dead." Ripe with paranoia, the new thriller If There's a Hell Below comes out on Digital HD and DVD today from Dark Sky Films, and we had the chance to catch up with writer/director Nathan Williams to discuss the making of his first feature film, including shooting in seclusion, cinematic influences, and a bean bag chair named Joe.

Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions for us, Nathan. When and how did you originally come up with the story for If There’s a Hell Below?

Nathan Williams: I conceived the film with my brother in the summer of 2013. We had talked for years about a chamber piece thriller set entirely in a single car. We didn't end up precisely there, but we used that impulse and gave ourselves hard restrictions (two vehicles,
See full article at DailyDead »

The 25 Best Movie Moments of 2016, According to IndieWire Critic David Ehrlich

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Movie Moments of 2016, According to IndieWire Critic David Ehrlich
It’s always an interesting exercise to arrive at the end of a year and take stock of the films that it produced, to squint for as much perspective as you can and see what the movies might have been saying to us, or to each other. Given the, uh, unique events of the last 12 months (or even just the last four weeks), it might take a little while longer than usual for us to have a clear sense of what the landscape really looked like. Will these films offer us rare insight into turbulent times, or — like much of what was released in theaters just prior to 9/11 — will they seem like relics from a more innocent world?

With that in mind, I thought it might be fun to get a bit more granular than usual, and to highlight individual moments from my 25 favorite films of the year (and, at least for the moment,
See full article at Indiewire »

[Nyff Review] Yourself and Yours

See enough films by any director and you’ll start to think you’ve got a grip on the whole thing. See everything they’ve directed — “everything,” here, constitutes 17 features and three shorts that are in excess of half an hour — and expected pleasures are chief among the reasons for continuing the journey. Yourself and Yours is enjoyable the way every other Hong Sang-soo film is enjoyable: funny, relatable and emotionally honest, structurally innovative, and composed with a patient eye that favors the peaks and valleys of conversation over standard get-to-the-point construction. Here, though, he wields a sharper blade: in its defiance of internal logic, character motivation, or even a conventional understanding, the film’s narrative (about doubles or twins or doppelgängers or all or none) brings contemplation of romantic relationships’ hardest edges — those gaps between men and women that no one’s quite figured out, perhaps because they’re
See full article at The Film Stage »

With ‘Things To Come,’ Mia Hansen-Løve Proves That She’s One Of The Best Filmmakers In The World — Nyff Review

With ‘Things To Come,’ Mia Hansen-Løve Proves That She’s One Of The Best Filmmakers In The World — Nyff Review
It’s never a good idea to take public transportation home from a funeral, but sexagenarian philosophy professor Nathalie Chazeaux (Isabelle Huppert) insists on learning that lesson the hard way. Crumpled against the window of a bus as it groans its way through the streets of Paris, Nathalie begins to cry. The teenage girl sitting in the seat across from her eyeballs the scene like she’s resisting the urge to Instagram it, like she has no idea that it’s only a matter of time before we’re all the woman crying on the bus. That’s when Nathalie spies Heinz (Andre Marcon), still technically her husband, walking around town with the young woman who recently inspired him to walk out on his wife of 25 years.

Sometimes, life is subtle — sometimes, it’s so in your face that you just have to laugh. And that’s exactly what Nathalie does,
See full article at Indiewire »

Hong Sang-Soo’s ‘Yourself And Yours’ Is A Delightfully Druken Riff On Abbas Kiarostami — Nyff Review

  • Indiewire
Hong Sang-Soo’s ‘Yourself And Yours’ Is A Delightfully Druken Riff On Abbas Kiarostami — Nyff Review
For those familiar with the films of Hong Sang-soo, there’s really only one thing you need to know: The new one is pretty major, and not just because they drink beer this time instead of the usual soju. For those who haven’t yet been introduced to this singularly idiosyncratic Korean auteur, “Yourself and Yours” is as good a place to start as any.

But first, a quick primer: Hong Sang-soo movies have never been about what happens. Some of them are about what happened, some of them are about what could have happened, and — increasingly — some of them are about the difference between the two. Of course, the joke with Hong is that his movies are pretty much indistinguishable, these rueful, belligerently drunken comedies so similar that watching any two of them in succession is like doing one of those cartoon puzzles where you have to spot the
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: ‘American Horror Story: My Roanoke Nightmare’ Already Feels Too Familiar

Last Week’S Review: American Horror Story: My Roanoke Nightmare’: Season 6 Gets Off To a Spooky Good Start

Fact vs. Fiction

The first episode of “My Roanoke Nightmare” was intriguing, not just because the ads were maddeningly vague (to the point where assuming Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuck simply hadn’t thought of an idea yet was not out of the question), but because once the set-up of the season was revealed, it was such a departure for “American Horror Story.” Sure, at its core it’s another one of ‘Ahs”s patented haunted houses, but the docu-series angle was a fresh twist.

Still, it’s a set-up with some concerns, most particularly how this conceit will play out over an entire season of television. Did they honestly hire Lily Rabe and Andre Holland just to provide running commentary? Doesn’t the fact that all of the characters
See full article at Indiewire »
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