Four Star Playhouse (1952–1956)
7.0/10
8
1 user

For Art's Sake 

Ted Parker enlists his friend Addy, a famous art expert, into an elaborate ruse to portray his budding love interest as a break-out artist, despite her lack of talent.

Director:

Leslie Goodwins

Writers:

Lou Rusoff (original story), Lou Rusoff (screenplay)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
David Niven ... Ted Parker
Barbara Billingsley ... Addy Bancroft
Nancy Gates ... Lois Rogers
William Forrest ... Sam Rogers
Dorothy Vaughan ... Mrs. Mack
Charles Maxwell Charles Maxwell ... Broker
Murray Alper ... Mechanic
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Storyline

Ted Parker enlists his friend Addy, a famous art expert, into an elaborate ruse to portray his budding love interest as a break-out artist, despite her lack of talent.

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Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Drama

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Details

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 November 1953 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Four Star Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Enjoyable dialog BUT the story is pretty dumb
11 October 2015 | by MartinHaferSee all my reviews

In this installment of "Four Star Playhouse", Barbara Billingsley stars along with David Niven. Niven's character is a real knucklehead. Despite being middle-aged, he's shamelessly chasing a very young girl. She is a struggling artist--mostly because her work sucks. But he conspires with his lady friend (Billingsley) to put on a fake art show and arrange for folks to buy the crappy paintings so that her daddy will let her stay in New York.

There are MANY problems with this silly show. First, why should Billingsley's character help in this charade--especially when SHE wants the guy?! Second, the way the plants came in to buy paintings was VERY sloppily done--with a maid and a mechanic IMMEDIATELY forgetting that they are supposed to pretend to be rich art lovers and reveal they work for the guy! It's a shame, as Niven and Billingsley give it their best. The only reason I give it a 5 is that the dialog occasionally is funny and sparkles...that is, when it's not being stupid and nonsensical.


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