All in the Family (1971–1979)
7.0/10
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A Girl Like Edith 

The butcher returns with his fiancee who is the spitting image of Edith who he still seems to have feelings for.

Director:

Paul Bogart

Writers:

Norman Lear (developed by), Bob Schiller | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Carroll O'Connor ... Archie Bunker
Jean Stapleton ... Edith Bunker / Judith Klammerstadt (as Giovanna Pucci)
Danielle Brisebois ... Stephanie Mills
Theodore Bikel ... Albrecht 'Alvin' Klemmer
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Storyline

The butcher returns with his fiancee who is the spitting image of Edith who he still seems to have feelings for.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

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Details

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 January 1979 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Tandem Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jean Stapleton played not only Edith Bunker but the dour, grumpy girlfriend of a local butcher who was in love with Edith, and found a girlfriend who looked exactly like Edith but was completely the opposite of her personality-wise. See more »

Connections

References The Blue Angel (1930) See more »

Soundtracks

I Love You (Je t'aime)
(1923) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Archer
Lyrics by Harlan Thompson
Portion sung by Jean Stapleton and Theodore Bikel
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User Reviews

Jean Stapleton in a dual role
6 May 2018 | by Jimmy_the_Gent4See all my reviews

Klemmer the butcher tells Edith he is getting married.

Theodore Bikel returns to the role of the butcher inexplicably in love with Edith. But now he has a new fiancee, an uptight German woman also played by Jean Stapleton. The series is now pulling all sorts of gimmicks trying to be funny, but the results are pretty silly. The over the shoulder shots of doubles in wigs to make it seem like the same actress is actually two different people were being used in 1960s sitcoms like "The Patty Duke Show". The only difference is that show was funny and this episode is not.


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