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‘Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am’ Director on the Late Author’s ‘Monumental’ Legacy

‘Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am’ Director on the Late Author’s ‘Monumental’ Legacy
Toni Morrison, the Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist who chronicled the black American experience, passed away Monday night at the age of 88. Her death, at the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, was announced by her publisher, Alfred A. Knopf. The cause of death was complications of pneumonia, according to a spokesperson. (Via The New York Times.) The author of 11 novels, including “Beloved,” “Sula,” and “Song of Solomon,” Morrison became the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize in literature in 1993.

Morrison’s biggest screen legacy was Jonathan Demme’s 1998 adaptation of “Beloved,” which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1988. Set during the American Civil War, the story follows a former slave who is haunted by a poltergeist and visited by a reincarnation of her daughter. The film starred Oprah Winfrey, Danny Glover, and Thandie Newton, and received an Academy Award nomination for Best Costume Design.

In June, Magnolia Pictures
See full article at Indiewire »

UK box office preview: Can 'Annabelle Comes Home', 'The Dead Don't Die' boost quiet-looking week?

UK box office preview: Can 'Annabelle Comes Home', 'The Dead Don't Die' boost quiet-looking week?
Other new openers include documentaries ’Armstrong’ and ’Pavarotti’, and Harry Wootliff’s debut feature ’Only You’.

It is a quiet week for new releases at the UK box office, with the top holdovers from last week likely to retain their places at the top of the chart.

Newcomers include Warner Bros’ horror sequel Annabelle Comes Home, the third entry in the successful franchise, which itself is a spin-off of The Conjuring series of films. Gary Dauberman directs the latest entry, which features Vera Farmiga in the cast. Farmiga appeared in the previous two Conjuring films and also stars in the upcoming sequel.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘A Bigger Splash’ Tops Quiet Weekend; ‘The Last Black Man In San Francisco’ Expands Strong: Specialty Box Office

‘A Bigger Splash’ Tops Quiet Weekend; ‘The Last Black Man In San Francisco’ Expands Strong: Specialty Box Office
The 4K restoration of 1974 semi-fictionalized documentary A Bigger Splash edged out with the top per theater average among the specialties this weekend, playing an exclusive run at the Metrograph Theater in Manhattan. Directed by Jack Hazan, the Metrograph Pictures release grossed $18K. This is the second release for Metrograph Pictures, following fellow doc, The Raft.

Noted Artistic and Programming Director of Metrograph Sunday: “After 45 years, it’s incredibly heartening to see audiences respond so positively to Jack Hazan’s masterpiece A Bigger Splash. We’re thrilled to be expanding the film nationwide after such a strong opening in New York.” The title, centered on artist David Hockney will head to other cities in the coming weeks.

Neon music drama Wild Rose launched in four L.A. and New York locations Friday. Directed by Tom Harper and starring Jessie Buckley as an aspiring country singer, the Toronto ’18 title grossed an estimated
See full article at Deadline »

Sara Driver Is Back: After ‘The Dead Don’t Die,’ a Charles Addams Project, and Much More

Sara Driver Is Back: After ‘The Dead Don’t Die,’ a Charles Addams Project, and Much More
One of the more amusing moments in Jim Jarmusch’s new zombie satire finds Iggy Pop lurching into a diner as one of two walking corpses moaning “coffeeeee,” making his way from human victims to the fresh brew on the counter. The other “Coffee Zombie,” as she’s credited, is Jarmusch’s longtime partner. But Sara Driver is a lot more than that.

As a director, Driver’s playful blend of shadowy fantasy and grimy New York living was a revelation in 1986’s “Sleepwalk,” a surreal and often haunting look at a woman adrift in supernatural circumstances. Jarmusch served as one of the cinematographers on the project, two years after Driver produced Jarmusch’s surprise breakout “Stranger Than Paradise.” However, while he continued honing his trademark deadpan filmmaking across the decades, Driver’s own directing career advanced in fits and starts.

Her sophomore effort, “When Pigs Fly,” landed in 1993, and
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Dead Don’t Die’ Shows Life; ‘Late Night’ Resembles ‘Booksmart’

‘The Dead Don’t Die’ Shows Life; ‘Late Night’ Resembles ‘Booksmart’
The specialty box office is following two paths. High-profile narrative festival premieres such as “The Dead Don’t Die” (Focus), “Late Night” (Amazon) and “Booksmart” (United Artists) play wide quickly. And documentaries like “Pavarotti” (CBS), “Echo in the Canyon” (Greenwich), and “The Biggest Little Farm” (Neon) catch a wave and ride success as they widen.

The old-fashioned arthouse platform release is a challenge but it can work: A24’s acclaimed Sundance debut “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” is showing rare strength among more limited specialized narrative titles. It remains a sign that careful handling of a critically praised film can still find an audience.

How to assess “Late Night” and “Booksmart”? Amazon’s second weekend expansion — similar to the “Booksmart” opening– yielded a disappointing result a little below the latter title. But it’s too early to predict how audiences are reacting as it propels ahead.

No question,
See full article at Indiewire »

Jim Jarmusch’s ‘The Dead Don’t Die’ Comes to Life With $2.3 Million Indie Box Office Debut

  • The Wrap
Jim Jarmusch’s ‘The Dead Don’t Die’ Comes to Life With $2.3 Million Indie Box Office Debut
The indie box office took a notable change of pace this weekend with the release of Focus Features’ “The Dead Don’t Die.” While indie releases are typically thought of as quiet dramas in a handful of theaters, the bloody, deadpan snark-filled zombie film that kicked off this year’s Cannes got the widest release in the directorial career of Jim Jarmusch.

Hitting 613 screens this weekend, “The Dead Don’t Die” opened to $2.35 million for a per screen average of $3,834. That total eclipsed the entire theatrical run of Jarmusch’s previous film, “Paterson,” which grossed $2.1 million in early 2017.

Also Read: 'Men in Black: International' Disappoints With $28 Million Box Office Opening

However, it appears unlikely that the film will top Jarmusch’s highest grossing film, “Broken Flowers,” which opened to a limited release in 2005 and legged out solidly to gross $13.7 million domestic and $46.7 million worldwide. The bone dry humor and bleak
See full article at The Wrap »

The Dead Don’t Die Review: The Worst Bill Murray Zombie Movie

The Dead Don't Die, but this lifeless movie with Bill Murray and Adam Driver certainly does.

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When the smoke clears and the very last episodes of The Walking Dead finally air, it might be a prudent idea for filmmakers and TV creatives out there to call a halt on anything related to zombies, walkers, wights, ghouls, and whatever other names they’ve come up in the last decade and a half. Horror’s most popular modern subgenre has almost certainly run its course, with the living dead having used up and burnt out every possible scenario and metaphor thrown at them.

Into this creative rut comes Jim Jarmusch and The Dead Don’t Die, the iconoclastic director’s attempt to both play around in and satirize the concept of the reanimated dead and what they could mean to us today. But one thing is for sure: They
See full article at Den of Geek »

All 13 Jim Jarmusch Films Ranked, From Worst to Best (Photos)

All 13 Jim Jarmusch Films Ranked, From Worst to Best (Photos)
The man who quietly (and always weirdly) helped to define American Independent Cinema in the 1980s, Jim Jarmusch has stubbornly made his own kinds of films in his own way. If Hollywood ever thought they could make him fit into one of their boxes, they were wrong to try, and eventually, his actor admirers sought him out to be in a series of idiosyncratic and always fascinating films. Here’s our ranking of his singular output:

13. “Coffee & Cigarettes” (2003): Sure, it’s the last one on this list, which technically means it’s the “worst,” but even the least plotted, most indulgent and freely floating Jim Jarmusch film provides memorably weird, comedic pleasures. This brazenly pointless sequence of non-events is 11 segments long, each one starring different actors, all of them talking — most frequently about the Tesla Coil — while drinking coffee and smoking. All except for Gza and RZA, that is,
See full article at The Wrap »

Bill Murray Explains Why He Created a Secret 1-800 Number to Be Reached About Roles

Bill Murray Explains Why He Created a Secret 1-800 Number to Be Reached About Roles
Bill Murray has become a mystical character in popular culture, and not only because he occasionally pops up at wedding parties. With no agent or manager, the elusive Murray assesses most roles that come his way through a 1-800 number that he created years ago. Without numerous filmmakers confirming its existence, Murray’s unusual answering machine might sound like another apocryphal tale from his quixotic mythology. However, in a recent interview with IndieWire, the actor explained that he created the number — which is not listed, and only passed around through word of mouth — to keep Hollywood agents off his back.

“I had a house phone, and it would just ring and ring,” Murray said, while promoting his starring role in Jim Jarmusch’s zombie comedy “The Dead Don’t Die,” which opens this week. “Finally, I’d pick up the phone and I’d say,
See full article at Indiewire »

Five Things Tilda Swinton Loves About Cannes

Five Things Tilda Swinton Loves About Cannes
The first time Tilda Swinton went to Cannes, it was for a film she hated. It was “Aria” in 1989, an omnibus title with contributions from Robert Altman, Jean-Luc Godard, Bruce Beresford, Nic Roeg, Charles Sturridge, Franc Roddam, and Derek Jarman. “We all got on like a house on fire,” she said. “A lot of people were drawn to libations in the crew. We all saw the film at the end, we all hated the film, and were friends for life.”

Since then, she’s attended to serve on two juries, and for eight films: Jim Jarmusch’s “Broken Flowers” and “Only Lovers Left Alive,” Béla Tarr’s “The Man From London,” David Mackenzie’s “Young Adam,” Lynne Ramsay’s “We Need to Talk About Kevin,” Bong Joon Ho’s “Okja,” and Wes Anderson’s “Moonrise Kingdom.” This year, she returns with Jarmusch’s opening-night zombie comedy, “The Dead Don’t Die.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Five Things Tilda Swinton Loves About Cannes

Five Things Tilda Swinton Loves About Cannes
The first time Tilda Swinton went to Cannes, it was for a film she hated. It was “Aria” in 1989, an omnibus title with contributions from Robert Altman, Jean-Luc Godard, Bruce Beresford, Nic Roeg, Charles Sturridge, Franc Roddam, and Derek Jarman. “We all got on like a house on fire,” she said. “A lot of people were drawn to libations in the crew. We all saw the film at the end, we all hated the film, and were friends for life.”

Since then, she’s attended to serve on two juries, and for eight films: Jim Jarmusch’s “Broken Flowers” and “Only Lovers Left Alive,” Béla Tarr’s “The Man From London,” David Mackenzie’s “Young Adam,” Lynne Ramsay’s “We Need to Talk About Kevin,” Bong Joon Ho’s “Okja,” and Wes Anderson’s “Moonrise Kingdom.” This year, she returns with Jarmusch’s opening-night zombie comedy, “The Dead Don’t Die.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes: Jim Jarmusch Confronts the End of the World Amid Faint Praise for His ‘The Dead Don’t Die’

Cannes: Jim Jarmusch Confronts the End of the World Amid Faint Praise for His ‘The Dead Don’t Die’
It’s rare for a Cannes opener to be a Competition prize-winner. Opening nights at the Grand Auditorium Louis Lumière are designed for maximum red carpet impact and a global marketing launch. Cannes veteran Jim Jarmusch knows the drill.

Even with dark end-of-the-world overtones, a laidback horror comedy does not a Competition contender make. (Its middling Metascore is 56.) Jarmusch’s “The Dead Don’t Die” delivers some mild chuckles, and is saved by its cast of Jarmusch regulars, especially Bill Murray (“Broken Flowers”) and Adam Driver (“Paterson”) as two deadpan country cops, Tilda Swinton as a Scottish Samurai warrior, and Tom Waits as philosophical Hermit Bob. But it does not advance the zombie genre. Still, Focus Features will surely get an awareness boost from Cannes for this light-hearted entertainment with darker themes on its mind.

While Jarmusch admits that he grew up on Universal horror, Dario Argento and John Carpenter
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Cannes: Jim Jarmusch Confronts the End of the World Amid Faint Praise for His ‘The Dead Don’t Die’

Cannes: Jim Jarmusch Confronts the End of the World Amid Faint Praise for His ‘The Dead Don’t Die’
It’s rare for a Cannes opener to be a Competition prize-winner. Opening nights at the Grand Auditorium Louis Lumière are designed for maximum red carpet impact and a global marketing launch. Cannes veteran Jim Jarmusch knows the drill.

Even with dark end-of-the-world overtones, a laidback horror comedy does not a Competition contender make. Jarmusch’s “The Dead Don’t Die” delivers some mild chuckles, and is saved by its cast of Jarmusch regulars, especially Bill Murray (“Broken Flowers”) and Adam Driver (“Paterson”) as two deadpan country cops, Tilda Swinton as a Scottish Samurai warrior, and Tom Waits as philosophical Hermit Bob. But it does not advance the zombie genre. Still, Focus Features will surely get an awareness boost from Cannes for this light-hearted entertainment with darker themes on its mind.

While Jarmusch admits that he grew up on Universal horror, Dario Argento and John Carpenter (both of whom he
See full article at Indiewire »

Bill Murray, Um, Kills It At The ‘Dead Don’t Die’ Cannes Press Conference

Cannes – “The Dead Don’t Die” has received a mostly ambivalent reaction from the media at Cannes, but when you have Bill Murray in your cast and in town you pretty much know his press availabilities are gonna be a ton of fun. Murray, who has previously collaborated with director Jim Jarmusch on “Broken Flowers” and “The Limits of Control,” was on fire as he answered one question after another at the film’s official press conference on Wednesday.

Continue reading Bill Murray, Um, Kills It At The ‘Dead Don’t Die’ Cannes Press Conference at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Selena Gomez: ‘Social Media Has Been Really Terrible For My Generation’

  • Variety
Selena Gomez: ‘Social Media Has Been Really Terrible For My Generation’
Selena Gomez took a moment at the Cannes Film Festival to lament a culture where everyone lives on their phones.

“I think our world is going through a lot,” Gomez said at a press conference in the South of France on Wednesday morning. “I would say for my generation, specifically, social media has really been terrible. It does scare me when you see how exposed these young boys and young girls are. They are not aware of the news. I think it’s dangerous for sure. I don’t think people are getting the right information sometimes.”

Gomez has more than 150 million Instagram followers, but she said that she’s learned to be selective about what she posts. “I think it’s pretty impossible to make it safe at this point,” Gomez said. “I’m grateful I have the platform. I don’t do a lot of pointless pictures. For me,
See full article at Variety »

Cannes 2019: Jarmusch's Deadpan Zombie Film 'The Dead Don't Die'

Jarmusch seems pretty upset about the way things are in our society these days. So he made a zombie film. The Dead Don't Die, a zombie comedy written & directed by American indie filmmaker Jim Jarmusch, just premiered at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival as the opening night gala film. This actually isn't so much of a zombie film, as it is social commentary covered with blood and zombie make-up, along with a couple of weary small-town cops who try their best to survive this hell. The film is an extremely obvious criticism of how miserable things are becoming, between climate change and materialism and idiots running America, and how it's all going to end badly no matter what we do. Alas, its wears out its welcome rather quickly and doesn't offer much heart humor to make-up for it, only zombie ...
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Zombies Invade French Riviera As Bill Murray, Adam Driver & ‘The Dead Don’t Die’ Open The 72nd Cannes Film Festival

Zombies Invade French Riviera As Bill Murray, Adam Driver & ‘The Dead Don’t Die’  Open The 72nd Cannes Film Festival
The 72nd Cannes International Film Festival opening night went to the zombies, at least our walking dead friends as filtered through the droll style of Jim Jarmusch in The Dead Don’t Die.

The director is a favorite of the fest, having been invited here for various films and competitions 13 times since his first appearance in 1984 when he won a prize for Stranger Than Paradise. Eight of his movies have competed in the official competition for the Palme d’Or, most recently the terrific Paterson three years ago. He never has won the top prize, but 1993’s Coffee and Cigarettes III took the Palme for the Shorts competition and the Bill Murray-starring film Broken Flowers won the Grand Prize (second place) in 2005 behind the Dardenne brothers’ L’Enfant. Early reviews are decidedly mixed for The Dead Don’t Die, but clearly the French love this guy and thus timing
See full article at Deadline »

‘The Dead Don’t Die’ Official Trailer: Jim Jarmusch’s Wild, Star-Studded Zombie Romp Opens Cannes

‘The Dead Don’t Die’ Official Trailer: Jim Jarmusch’s Wild, Star-Studded Zombie Romp Opens Cannes
Leave it to Jim Jarmusch to breathe a little life into both the zombie movie and the Cannes Film Festival with his latest feature: the starry festival’s official opening night film, “The Dead Don’t Die.” The latest from the indie filmmaker takes him back to the kind of genre roots he previously toyed with in his vampire film “Only Lovers Left Alive” (what’s next? a werewolf movie?), with the “Paterson” and “Broken Flowers” director next exploring the vibrant after-life of zombies. At least he’ll be armed with some of his favorite collaborators, including Adam Driver, Tilda Swinton, and Bill Murray.

“The Dead Don’t Die” stars Driver and Murray as local cops who must spring into action when a zombie outbreak begins affecting the town’s citizens. Jarmusch shot the movie in upstate New York, and Murray has gone on record saying the director has “written
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Festival Kicks Off With Starry Red Carpet, Agnes Varda Tribute

  • Variety
Cannes Film Festival Kicks Off With Starry Red Carpet, Agnes Varda Tribute
Bill Murray, Adam Driver, and Selena Gomez walked the red carpet outside the Palais des Festivals on Tuesday night to kick off the Cannes Film Festival with the splashy premiere of Jim Jarmusch’s “The Dead Don’t Die.”

They weren’t the only big names parading past a firing line of photographers and fans. Javier Bardem shook his hips before waving to the crowd, Elle Fanning dazzled in a flowing pink gown with an elaborate cape, and Tilda Swinton, wearing her blonde hair in a pompadour, looked coolly elegant in a sparkling dress. It was an intoxicating mixture of glamour and cinephilia, a signature cocktail that has made the seaside gathering perhaps the most famous gathering of film stars and auteurs in the world.

The display of star power comes as the festival is trying to navigate a changing media landscape, one in which the festival’s reverence for
See full article at Variety »

Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Selena Gomez Bring Star Power to 2019 Cannes Film Festival

Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Selena Gomez Bring Star Power to 2019 Cannes Film Festival
The Cannes Film Festival is famous for being a glamorous, A-list event — and this year is bound to not disappoint with stars like Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio, Margot Robbie and Selena Gomez all attending with movies in competition.

The annual event kicks off on Tuesday, bringing some of the starriest names and films to the South of France for 11 days of parties and red carpets.

The festival features 21 films competing for the coveted Palme d’Or, the grand prize, which has been awarded to such classics as Taxi Driver and The Piano. This year, Birdman director Alejandro González Iñárritu leads
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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