The Wanderer (1913)

In the valley the world's best "eternal triangle" is being worked between a husband, a much younger wife and "one who covets." On the heights, the shepherd hears the call and for the nonce ... See full summary »
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Cast

Cast overview:
King Baggot ... The Shepherd
Jane Gail ... The Wife
Howard Crampton ... The Husband
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Storyline

In the valley the world's best "eternal triangle" is being worked between a husband, a much younger wife and "one who covets." On the heights, the shepherd hears the call and for the nonce becomes a wanderer, and descends into the valley of Passions and Pain. It is the gentle, unfelt, almost unseen influence of the wanderer that stops a maddened husband from first murder and then suicide; exposes the frailty of a wife to her own consideration, and points out to her the grim consequences of a moment's folly, and finally takes the "one who covets" away from the born passions of the valley a far journey up the heights, and disaster to three souls. Averted, the wanderer, again the good shepherd, returns to his peaceful grazingship. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Short

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 April 1913 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Strong in motive and thought-compelling
28 August 2017 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

An allegorical offering, suggesting "The Servant in the House" and like productions. King Baggott, as the shepherd, descends into the city, where he prevents a married woman from throwing herself away on a stranger. The scenes are well pictured and when the shepherd returns to his flocks we feel that he has accomplished some good for mankind by his journey into the world. Not powerful, but strong in motive and thought-compelling. - The Moving Picture World, April 19, 1913


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