Bear Ye One Another's Burdens (1910)

When an infirm husband learns of the dire circumstances his wife must endure, he makes every effort to bring himself back to health.

Director:

Harry Solter
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Florence Lawrence ... Mrs. George Rand
King Baggot ... George Rand
Edit

Storyline

George Rand is overcome by a stroke of paralysis in the office of his broker, and after being brought around goes to his home, where he has a second attack, after which he is practically helpless. He is unable even to move about, and his wife decides to take over his business cares and responsibilities. She goes to his broker with certain bonds to arrange a business transaction, but the broker makes it appear that the papers are worthless. Convinced that their fortune is swept away, saddened at the prospect of a bleak and destitute future, but determined to keep the information from her husband, she returns to her home. Soon they are reduced to straightened circumstances, and the wife establishes a little workroom adjacent to the one in which the invalid is confined, and which is so carefully screened from his view that he cannot see the misery and squalor so near to the garnished and glided trimmings of his own room. When near and about him, Mrs. Rand wears the costly clothes of ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

number in title | See All (1) »

Genres:

Short | Drama | Romance

Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 July 1910 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Those who criticize the moving picture should see this one
2 August 2015 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

Here is a story that goes to the heart in a way that would be difficult to explain, yet it is easily understood when the picture is seen. The wife bears her burden uncomplainingly and the palsied invalid in the next room doesn't know the difference in their circumstances. But it comes about in a dramatic way that he learns and life comes back to his palsied limbs, and the picture closes with a reunion and change which brings happiness to the three. Those who criticize the moving picture should see this one; they should carefully study the lesson it teaches and perhaps they would agree that some good can come out of a motion picture after all. It is one of the strongest of the week and should prove popular with any audience. - The Moving Picture World, August 13, 1910


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed