6.1/10
158
3 user 2 critic

The Honour of the House (1999)

Ungfrúin góða og húsið (original title)
A hypocritical and selfish older sister holds power over her younger sister by hiding the shame of her pregnancy.

Writer:

Halldór Laxness (book)
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6 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tinna Gunnlaugsdóttir Tinna Gunnlaugsdóttir ... Þuríður
Ragnhildur Gísladóttir Ragnhildur Gísladóttir ... Rannveig
Agneta Ekmanner ... Prófastsfrú
Rúrik Haraldsson Rúrik Haraldsson ... Prófastur
Egill Ólafsson ... Björn
Reine Brynolfsson ... Hans
Bjørn Floberg ... Viggó
Helgi Björnsson Helgi Björnsson ... Andrés
Ghita Nørby Ghita Nørby ... Fru Kristensen
Margret Erla Maack Margret Erla Maack ... Eldri dóttir Þuríðar (as Margrét Erla Maack)
Ellen Egilsdóttir Ellen Egilsdóttir ... Yngri dóttir Þuríðar
Magnús Ólafsson Magnús Ólafsson ... Læknir
Helga Braga Jónsdóttir Helga Braga Jónsdóttir ... Ólétt stúlka
Sigurveig Jónsdóttir Sigurveig Jónsdóttir ... Eldir þjónustustúlka
Gagga Jonsdottir Gagga Jonsdottir ... Yngri þjónustustúlka (as Rannveig Jónsdóttir)
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Storyline

A hypocritical and selfish older sister holds power over her younger sister by hiding the shame of her pregnancy.

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Plot Keywords:

based on book | See All (1) »

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

Sweden | Iceland

Language:

Icelandic | Danish | Swedish

Release Date:

8 October 1999 (Iceland) See more »

Also Known As:

Das gute Fräulein See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

ISK160,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Agneta Ekmanner & Reine Brynolfsson are Swedish actors and did not speak a word of Icelandic. They learned all of there lines phonetically, See more »

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User Reviews

 
a warm, sad, odd film
13 September 2002 | by Ed-90See all my reviews

In many ways this was quite a good film. Set in Iceland and Denmark, it shows the difficult lives of men and women in the fishing business, but also (as Laxness loved to write about) the dissolute lifestyle of the wealthy. Laxness won the Nobel Prize for Lit in 1955, yet he was hounded out of the US in the late 1920's, appalled by what he saw in New York City/America as the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots." In this film, Laxness portrays the shallowness of the haves' lives; worried more for appearances and images than human love and dignity. It makes me want to read more of Laxness's works. I recommend it, especially for people who like the "Hannah and her sisters" strong-women-surviving-against-impossible-odds theme. And/or those who can abide the portrayal of men as drunks, philanderers, lechers, buffoons, religious hypocrites, idiots, bribers, etc., all of whom are in this film. This latter extreme portrayal pattern was obvious, and thus a real drawback of the film.


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