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Film Review: The Net (2016) by Kim Ki-duk

I have to admit, although I am a big fan of Kim Ki-duk’s films, his latest efforts have not satisfied me at all. After the trouble he had with “Moebius,” he has toned down, to the point that his films have lost the shocking element that made them so special. “The Net,” however, seems like an effort to return to his roots, although not fully realized.

The Net” screened at Art Film Fest Kosice

The net of Chul-woo, a poor North Korean fisherman, is caught in the engine of his boat, and accidentally, he drifts into South Korea. The authorities arrest him and start interrogating him brutally, as they also try to make him defect. His situation is worsened by his main interrogator, who seems to harbor an intense hatred for North Koreans. On the other hand, a younger agent named Jin-woo, who is assigned to him, is much kinder,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Sandra Bullock (‘Bird Box’): Do you think she’ll win an MTV Movie and TV Award for being scared senseless?

Sandra Bullock (‘Bird Box’): Do you think she’ll win an MTV Movie and TV Award for being scared senseless?
Bird Box” was a surprise word-of-mouth hit when it premiered on Netflix last winter. The horror film stars Sandra Bullock as a woman struggling to survive in a post-apocalyptic world where she’s forced to keep herself and her children blindfolded or else succumb to a supernatural force that causes suicidal madness. So she’s literally scared senseless in the film. Do you think she’ll win the MTV Movie and TV Award for Most Frightened Performance?

Bullock has a long history at these kudos, going all the way back to her breakthrough role in “Speed” 25 years ago. That film won her three MTV Movie Awards (long before they started including TV shows): Best Female Performance, Most Desirable Female and Best On-Screen Duo with Keanu Reeves. Since then MTV has also nominated her for performances in “While You Were Sleeping,” “The Net,” “The Proposal,” “The Blind Side” and “Gravity.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Peter Bart: A Memoir Coming, Irwin Winkler Burnishes His Legend By Bringing Scorsese, De Niro & Pacino To Netflix For ‘The Irishman’

Peter Bart: A Memoir Coming, Irwin Winkler Burnishes His Legend By Bringing Scorsese, De Niro & Pacino To Netflix For ‘The Irishman’
In January 2013, Martin Scorsese assembled the cast of his projected next movie, titled The Irishman, for a read-through of the shooting script. Their names — De Niro, Pacino and Pesci – did not resonate as “Irish.” Moreover, the actors, all in their 70s, would play ages 30 to 80 with the help of newly developed technology. The movie would likely be the most expensive non-superhero movie of the year — that is, if it found financing.

And that, the cast knew, was largely in the hands of producer Irwin Winkler, whose recent adventures in funding pictures had been more suspenseful than the plots of his films. Since Winkler has been defying the odds for some 50 years, it’s no surprise that The Irishman will finally get its release this fall, albeit seven years after the reading. The final cost is rumored to approach $140 million, due to its multiple locations set in different periods – a total
See full article at Deadline »

Move Over Windows Vista, ‘The Net 2.0’ is the Worst System Update of the Millennium

Move Over Windows Vista, ‘The Net 2.0’ is the Worst System Update of the Millennium
(Welcome to Dtv Descent, a series that explores the weird and wild world of direct-to-video sequels to theatrically released movies. In this edition, we visit the dark web for a peek behind the digital curtain in search of the sequel to the Sandra Bullock hit The Net!) Everyone knows the interweb is a scary place, but some of […]

The post Move Over Windows Vista, ‘The Net 2.0’ is the Worst System Update of the Millennium appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Cryptocurrrencies – Hollywood’s next tech bandwagon?

  • Nerdly
Hollywood loves making films about new technology – A couple of years after a tech innovation or trend first appears, the film industry jumps on the bandwagon and makes a slew of movies about it.

Although the science fiction genre explored futuristic technologies as far back as Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927), the use of real-life modern tech as a major theme in film really began in the 1960’s. James Bond’s pager in From Russia with Love (1963) is surely the first time a mobile communications device appeared on the silver screen. By the 1980’s, computers were the big tech theme. Films like War Games (1983), Electric Dreams (1984) and Weird Science (1985) promised a future where computers would help us create the perfect mate and then burn us to a crisp.

In the 90’s the fledging internet and its geeky sibling e-mail were major plot devices in several films, including The Net (1995) and You
See full article at Nerdly »

Scream Factory Blu-ray Review Round-Up: Brainscan, The Unborn, Return Of The Living Dead Part II Collector’s Edition

  • DailyDead
The longer Scream Factory has been in business, the more high profile and “classic” titles they have released, the more they have begun to dig a little deeper for the kinds of catalogue titles and semi-obscurities for which devoted horror fans have been clamoring for years. New licensing deals have made new titles possible, including three new releases that have been among the most highly requested movies in Scream Factory’s history. As if there was any doubt, the fact that these three films now have special edition Blu-rays are proof positive that we are living in a golden age of home video.

First up is Brainscan, a 1994 effort in the tradition of Evilspeak, Trick or Treat, and 976-Evil in which a lonely, depressed kid named Michael (Edward Furlong) unlocks the door into a world of horror when a computer game called Brainscan puts him in the body of a
See full article at DailyDead »

How a Devastating Divorce Led Sandra Bullock to True Love

How a Devastating Divorce Led Sandra Bullock to True Love
By her early thirties, Sandra Bullock was already weary from the whole, complicated looking-for-love process. She was seeing someone, "really sweet," she told Dennis Hensley in a 1996 interview for Detour, but getting to that point had been rough. "For a year I was by myself trying to date and I'm telling you dating was the worst experience I ever had," she confessed. "I seem to have attracted everyone whose intentions were not the best." It's not so much that they were after a slice of her growing fortune or her very much on-the-rise fame (though she said one suitor's ex-girlfriend sold a story claiming he was...
See full article at E! Online »

Film Review: Grass (2018) by Hong Sang-soo

Last year I (once again) faced my prejudice towards Kim Ki-duk and watched “The Net”. I found it formulaic, empty and calculative. At least, not many actresses were harmed during the filming. This year, I decided to repeat the experiment with “Grass” by Hong Sang-soo. And yes, I am equally fond of him as I am of Kim Ki-duk. I respect his early work and what it meant for New Korean Film, his soft spot for importance of banalities in everyday life, yet I am anything of a fan of Hong’s films made after “Virgin Stripped Bare by her Bachelors”. I just find them unbearably heavy-handed and pretentious. But I also know people can change, plus, well, “Grass” only goes a little over one hour and Kim Min-hee has never been less than amazing. So, what could go wrong, right?

Grass is screening at Art Film Fest Kosice

“Grass
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Germany’s Crime-Fighting ‘Professor T.’ Heads to U.S. (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Brilliant but eccentric crime-fighting psychologist “Professor T.” started out in Belgium, proved popular in Germany, and is now headed for the U.S., Italy and Denmark.

The drama series hails from Belgium, where it airs on Vrt. German pubcaster Zdf’s remake was a hit locally. As the second season of the Rowboat Film-produced German version gets ready to launch Friday, a raft of international buyers have acquired the German series.

Mhz has acquired it for the U.S., while pubcaster Rai has bought it for Italy and Dr for Denmark. German drama is in vogue, but unlike “Babylon Berlin,” “Das Boot” or “Four Blocks,” “Professor T.” runs on a mainstream free-tv channel, not an edgy pay-tv channel.

Beta Film sells the German version and struck the new international deals for the eight-part German series. It stars Matthias Matschke (“Grand Budapest Hotel”) as the titular professor, who teaches criminology and
See full article at Variety »

MipTV, Canneseries: Key Deals, Announcements

  • Variety
Following the inaugural Canneseries festival and with the MipTV trade fare coming to a close, Variety looks back at some of the key television deals and announcements impacting the Croisette:

Scripted

*In the biggest production news of the market, “The Wire’s” David Simon and Spain’s Mediapro announced they are in co-development on a new Simon series project, “A Dry Run,” about Abraham Lincoln Battalion members fighting fascism in the Spanish Civil War.

*In Canneseries’ highest-profile sales deal, France’s Canal Plus announced it had acquired Phoebe Waller Bridge’s Canneseries’ competition favorite “Killing Eve.” HBO Europe also snapped up the show across Central and Eastern Europe, Iberia, and Scandinavia.

*One of the biggest drama announcements of the week saw Beta Film and Red Bull Media House announce they were teaming to develop a five-season, high-end soccer drama called “The Net.” Inspired by true events, each season will comprise
See full article at Variety »

Miptv: Beta Film, Red Bull pact on football series 'The Net'

Beta Film announces project at annual pre-miptv dinner in Cannes.

German drama powerhouse Beta Film and Austria’s Red Bull Media House are joining forces on a high-end scripted mega series inspired by football and provisionally entitled The Net.

The project spans 40 hours of drama, divided into five stand-alone, eight-episode series revolving around characters linked in some way to the world of football, whether it be as a fan, player, coach or footballer’s wife.

German opera and theatre director Matthias Hartmann – who is known for his out-of-the-box productions of Fidelio and La Bohème – came up with the concept with
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Beta Film, Red Bull pact on football series 'The Net'

Beta Film announces project at annual pre-miptv dinner in Cannes.

German drama powerhouse Beta Film and Austria’s Red Bull Media House are joining forces on a high-end scripted mega series inspired by football and provisionally entitled The Net.

The project spans 40 hours of drama, divided into five stand-alone, eight-episode series revolving around characters linked in some way to the world of football, whether it be as a fan, player, coach or footballer’s wife.

German opera and theatre director Matthias Hartmann – who is known for his out-of-the-box productions of Fidelio and La Bohème – came up with the concept with
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Beta, Red Bull Media House Team for Five-Season Soccer Drama Series ‘The Net’

  • Variety
Cannes — In what looks like one of the biggest drama series announcements at Cannes this MipTV, Beta Film and Red Bull Media House are teaming to develop a high-end drama series project, “The Net,” a five-season series, with eight episodes to each season.

A fiction drama series, a departure for Rbmh, “The Net” centers on the world of soccer and is inspired by true events, the partners announced at a Rbmh dinner on Sunday night at the Riviera. Shooting is scheduled to commence in 2019/20. “The Net” is based on a concept by Matthais Hartmann and Plinio Bachmann.

Every one of the five seasons will take place in a different country, Beta and Rbmh’s strategy will be to seek out local anchor broadcaster partners for each country, while co-producing with a local independent co-producer.

The Net,” however, will not feature soccer matches but rather the context: Organized crime, drugs, bribery,
See full article at Variety »

Binging Supernatural? Here's Why You Recognize Benny the Vampire

Perhaps one of the most adorable friendships we've seen on Supernatural is that of Dean Winchester and Benjamin Lafitte. Benny is a gentle vampire (is that an oxymoron?) who helps Dean escape from purgatory back in season eight, and in exchange, he's brought back to life . . . right before he gives Dean permission to kill him so he can return to purgatory and help Sam, who's trapped. Benny remains a fan-favorite minor character, with many of us hoping he'll return to the show someday. Have you ever wondered what else you might have seen this vampirate in? Well, look no further, because we have all the answers - and this monster has a ton of acting credits under his belt. Ty Olsson made his acting debut in the television series The X-Files in 1998. He snagged a bunch of other small television appearances like Viper, The Sentinel, The Net, and The Inspectors
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Across the Mooniverse: is Mute a lost, 90s made Blade Runner sequel from another dimension or Button Moon The Movie on downers?

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Daniel Goodwin

Duncan Jones’ fourth feature, the long gestating twinkle in his eye/ pseudo Moon sequel Mute, is finally set to make its Netflix debut on Friday 23rd February. This British/German sci-fi production, filmed in Berlin, has been a passion project of Jones’ for some time and one that has careered from pipedream to planned and temporarily postponed. But when potent concepts flower within the minds of passionate artists they have a tendency to materialise in some form or another; whatever the cost. In Mute’s case, due to the evolution of online streaming triggering an industry metamorphosis, the film will mostly bypass cinemas* and arrive in the homes of Netflix subscribers on Friday 23rd February. What is known of the narrative is not much beyond a log-line with morsels extracted from myriad sources to form a patchwork understanding of what the story might be.

Prior to the
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘The Circle’: 5 Reasons Why Tom Hanks and Emma Watson’s Movie Bombed

‘The Circle’: 5 Reasons Why Tom Hanks and Emma Watson’s Movie Bombed
Nobody sets out to make a bad movie. So why did cautionary tech thriller “The Circle” — adapted by lauded writer-director James Ponsoldt (“The Spectacular Now,” “The End of the Tour”) and beloved novelist Dave Eggers from his own 2013 bestseller — earn such negative reviews (43 on Metacritic, 17 on Rotten Tomatoes) and bomb at the box office ($9.3 million in 3,163 theaters)?

The movie went wrong in five significant ways.

1. The movie was foreign financed.

The Circle” was developed by A-list ex-DreamWorks producers Walter Parkes and Laurie MacDonald’s Parkes+MacDonald Image Nation, which raised financing from Imagenation Abu Dhabi Fz and foreign sales company FilmNation on the power of Tom Hanks, who was the first star on board via his Playtone banner.

In order to raise an $18-million budget, globally bankable star Emma Watson was cast in a central leading role that demanded she be in every scene. Veering in tone from satiric comedy to naturalistic drama,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘The Circle’: 5 Reasons Why Tom Hanks and Emma Watson’s Movie Bombed

‘The Circle’: 5 Reasons Why Tom Hanks and Emma Watson’s Movie Bombed
Nobody sets out to make a bad movie. So why did cautionary tech thriller “The Circle” — adapted by lauded writer-director James Ponsoldt (“The Spectacular Now,” “The End of the Tour”) and beloved novelist Dave Eggers from his own 2013 bestseller — earn such negative reviews (43 on Metacritic, 17 on Rotten Tomatoes) and bomb at the box office ($9.3 million in 3,163 theaters)?

The movie went wrong in five significant ways.

1. The movie was foreign financed.

The Circle” was developed by A-list ex-DreamWorks producers Walter Parkes and Laurie MacDonald’s Parkes+MacDonald Image Nation, which raised financing from Imagenation Abu Dhabi Fz and foreign sales company FilmNation on the power of Tom Hanks, who was the first star on board via his Playtone banner.

In order to raise an $18-million budget, globally bankable star Emma Watson was cast in a central leading role that demanded she be in every scene. Veering in tone from satiric comedy to naturalistic drama,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Circle | Review

Like a Record Round: Ponsoldt Spins the Wheels with Silly Tech Thriller

James Ponsoldt launches uneasily into mainstream studio territory with the internet thriller The Circle, a rather awkward slog from the indie auteur revered for The Spectacular Now (2013) and The End of the Tour (2015). An eerie contemplation on the dangerous direction technology and social media has already brought us, Ponsoldt’s film already feels a bit behind the curve (in a decade, it may be akin to something like the 1995 Sandra Bullock thriller The Net) in its deliberations on the decreased gap between notions of what’s public and private in the digital age of transparency.

Emma Watson stars as another easily manipulated heroine (“there’s not a cynical bone in your body,” she’s told by an admirer), using her mottled purity to gain, without much effort, the upper hand in an increasingly illogical dystopic vision meant as cutting commentary on our contemporary dependence on interconnectedness. Some interesting ideas abound in Ponsoldt’s adaptation of the Dave Eggers novel, but this cinematic conceptualization seems more along the lines of the Ya prequel to popular post-apocalyptic fiction (i.e., The Giver).

Mae Holland (Watson) is stuck in a dead-end temp job waiting for the next best thing. Having moved beyond her childhood days, including a connection with the grounded Mercer (Ellar Coltrane), she watches helplessly as her mother (Glenne Headley) must singlehandedly care for her ailing father (Bill Paxton), who suffers from Ms. When she receives a phone call from her best friend Annie (Karen Gillan) confirming she netted Mae an interview for an entry-level position with The Circle, a highly desirable tech company which has slowly begun to monopolize the market, it seems brighter days are on the horizon. Initially overjoyed to be offered a position as a customer experience manager, which affords her the ability to provide first rate health care insurance for her parents, Mae soon becomes consumed by the 24/7 immersion, which includes living within the confines of the The Circle’s sprawling campus. The Circle, run by affable co-founder Eamon Bailey (Tom Hanks) champions the notion of sharing everything, as well as complete transparency regarding every interaction. But Mae soon finds out, with considerable sacrifice, the dangers of a system derailing every semblance of privacy.

Kudos to Ponsoldt on assembling a stellar supporting cast, particularly the winning combination of Glenne Headley and Bill Paxton (in a final on-screen performance) as Watson’s gracious parents. As the Steve Jobs-like co-founder of the tech magnate, Hanks (starring in his second Eggers adaptation following Tom Tykwer’s A Hologram for the King, 2016) is cast against type, manipulating his harmless everyman persona to hide the white collar elitist underneath it. However, he isn’t given much to work with, often outdone by Patton Oswalt as a bitchy COO who gleefully clobbers his adversaries.

If Watson is stuck playing the internet age’s equivalent of Jane Eyre, she’s not alone in her blandness, oddly positioned between the masculine affections of Ellar Coltrane as her blue collar childhood pal and app wunderkind John Boyega, constantly lurking on the periphery to be called on as needed. Both function as necessary catalysts for the all-too-convenient finale, which doesn’t so much lead to a dramatic climax instead of a predictable dribble. What’s more apt is the rendering of a modern reality where we’re all plugged in to a constant influx of unnecessary information and superficial social media interaction to the point where the notion of individuality reaches the equivalent of digital extinction.

A lot of time and effort was put into conjuring the wide-ranging insanity of comments on Watson’s live-feed, which perfectly mimics our current way of interacting with our environments by engaging in rapid fire, instantly forgettable one-sided correspondence (and, in essence, gets its point across a lot more effectively than the snide black comedy Ingrid Goes West, 2017).

However, as a pulse-pounding thriller, The Circle never elevates the heartbeat, partially because it also is centered on a heroine who is, if anything, so meticulously passive, she’s like the damsels in distress from the B-picture genre efforts of yore—a woman who finally does act, but is apparently color blind to obvious red flags and unaware of preemptive measures. As a relevant lesson in how complete transparency and the incessant oversharing fostered by social media creates a gateway for totalitarian dictates, The Circle is eerily pertinent. If only it could have been a smarter, more vehement piece of social commentary, than perhaps it could have also seemed prescient.

★★/☆☆☆☆☆

The post The Circle | Review appeared first on Ioncinema.com.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Consider With Reservations: The Stars of Quantity Over Quality Cinema

The stars of yesterday now are making three films a year you never knew existed until they show up on Netflix.^ Real Movie ^

In my prior life as a script reader, I certainly read a lot of bad scripts, but at times, an even more common occurrence was a script that seemed to do a great many things right, but somehow fell just short of being something you wanted to champion as a movie. As draining as the terrible scripts were, there’s something pure about clear-cut bad. It takes little effort to explain why they’re unfit.

The real challenges were the scripts that had kind of a decent premise, kind of an okay twist or two, and a lead character who wasn’t bad so much as he or she was just… there. The raw materials are there for what Could be a script. They just happen to be assembled in the least compelling way
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Awfully Good: The Net

  • JoBlo
Emma Watson and Tom Hanks may learn about the dark side of technology in The Circle, but nothing compares to the horrors of. The Net (1995) Director: Irwin Winkler Stars: Sandra Bullock, Jeremy Northam, Dennis Miller A computer programmer has her identity deleted and must use her Leet Skillz to get her life back. Movies centered around technology have a quick-expiring shelf life. At... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »
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