Living in Oblivion (1995) - News Poster

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Gaspar Noe’s Psychedelic Mockumentary ‘Lux Æterna’ Might Give You Seizures — Cannes Review

Gaspar Noe’s Psychedelic Mockumentary ‘Lux Æterna’ Might Give You Seizures — Cannes Review
Ever since Gaspar Noé cranked up his ambition with “Enter the Void” 10 years ago, the filmmaker has divided audiences with unruly, disorienting filmmaking techniques. Frames blink in and out, cameras float and speed through unexpected spaces, and neon palettes pulsate. His recent spate of movies often yield overwhelming experiences closer to the visceral terrain of avant-garde cinema than the narrative traditions he roots within the mayhem. His style can be a mixed bag of visual provocations, but his showmanship remains admirable for its bold swings each time out.

It’s hard to imagine that Noé could serve any master other than himself, and it comes as no great surprise that his recent assignment to make a 15-minute commercial for Yves Saint Laurent went awry when Noé turned it into his own weird thing: “Lux Æterna,” a 50-minute psychedelic mockumentary about a film shoot gone wrong, distills Noé’s talents to a more palatable serving size.
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"The Hunt" Adds Kate Mulvany As Series Regular, 5 More Join In Recurring Roles For Amazon Original

  • Deadline
Exclusive: The cast for Amazon Prime Video’s vengeance-driven Nazi-hunting series executive produced by Academy Award winner Jordan Peele continues to grow with Kate Mulvany joining as a series regular and James Le Gros, Ebony Obsidian, Caleb Emery, Henry Hunter Hall and Jeannie Berlin boarding in key recurring roles. They join an already robust cast including Al Pacino, Logan Lerman, Jerrika Hinton, Josh Radnor as well as Lena Olin, Carol Kane, Saul Rubinek, Tiffany Boone, Louis Ozawa Changchien, Greg Austin and Dylan Baker.

The Hunt, created by David Weil, follows a diverse band of Nazi hunters living in 1977 New York City. The Hunters, as they’re known, have discovered that hundreds of high-ranking Nazi officials are living among us and conspiring to create a Fourth Reich in the U.S. The eclectic team of Hunters will set out on a bloody quest to bring the Nazis to justice and thwart their new genocidal plans.
See full article at Deadline »

Fantastic Fest 2018 Review: One Cut Of The Dead is an Infinitely Charming Zombie Movie

  • DailyDead
Here’s the warning before you start One Cut of the Dead: you may not like it at the beginning. You may get motion sickness from the long handheld take—the titular “one cut,” as the camera bobs around, zooming in and out on the frenzied, exciting action. You may think to yourself, “Well yes, this is all good and fun, but where the hell is it going? I mean, I love practical effects and zombies, but what’s the point?” And you’re probably going to get the urge to back out of the film and go perusing down the digital highway to find another film that might satisfy you better. But I would recommend that you don’t do that under any circumstances, because you’d be missing out on one of the sweetest, funniest films of the year.

One Cut of the Dead is the kind
See full article at DailyDead »

The Best Films About Filmmaking — IndieWire Critics Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday.

This week’s question: In honor of “Godard Mon Amour,” Michel Hazanavicius’ movie about Jean-Luc Godard, what is the best film about filmmaking (or filmmakers)?

Matt Zoller Seitz (@mattzollerseitz), RogerEbert.com

I always thought the best movie about filmmaking, and filmmakers, and about artistry in the commercial system generally, is “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.” A lot of people have similar visions based on real life incidents, and pursue it in various creative ways, but only one makes it to the landing site, and he only succeeds because he’s devoted himself to it so singlemindedly that he throws his own family aside. He has the mind of a child and ends the film surrounded by childlike beings. All the scenes of Roy Neary trying to realize the shape through sculpture
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Very Big Shot’ Makes Very Big impact with its Powerful Take on Politics and Crime

In the spirit of fun and satire as only the Lebanese can do it (think Nadine Labaki), “ Very Big Shot” (Lebanon, Qatar; 2015) takes an unexpected twist from its initial drug heist opening to its anti-hero protagonist grasping the power of the image of media and ultimately spinning into the power of image in politics. This romp brings to mind 2012 Toronto Film Festival’s “Seven Boxes” (“7 Cajas”) which sold very well internationally.

The comedic mask covers a lot more for the audience to either pick up on or just to enjoy for what it is: a well told fun and funny story. The story has a particular Lebanese flavor and it began in a particular community which has drug dealers and violence and fanatics, but it moves into more universal contradictions between what is real, what is fiction as depicted in the movie being made within the film we are watching and how fiction becomes political fodder.

“ Very Big Shot “depicts the lives of three brothers – Jad, who is just coming out of prison after serving five years for a crime committed by his elder brother Ziad, and their middle brother Joe. A delivery for a local crime ring spins out of control and Ziad seizes the opportunity to make a fortune.

That “Very Big Shot” was made by three brothers and actually stars an actor who, after coming out of prison for manslaughter could not find other employment, makes this movie more nuanced than most audiences would imagine.

The directorial debut of Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya, who worked with his two brothers, Christian Bou Chaaya and Lucien Bou Chaaya, “Very Big Shot” started out as a short and received such positive attention and critical acclaim at several international festivals, that the idea of developing it into a full-fledged feature film was born.

The feature film project received support both from the region and international talent, giving the Arab world a powerful film on organized crime and the political nexus.

Earning tremendous acclaim at its screening at the third Ajyal Youth Film Festival, “Very Big Shot” is a dark comedy that pans the camera on Lebanese society, tackling multiple layers of the society. Says director Mir-Jan, “in Lebanon there is no separation between social life and political life and the scenario reflects that”.

It is co-written by Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya and Alain Saadeh, who also stars in the film. The three Bou Chaaya Brothers combine financial know-how of brother Lucien who was (and still is) an investment attorney in Paris before turning his attention to raising financing for this film and talent; director Mir-Jean and actor producer Christian, a real-life restaurant owner which reflects directly on this film where the three fictitious brothers make a living running their father’s legacy, a pizza take-out place. In real-life one of the three brothers would always keep the others going in the face of obstacles which are inevitable for first time filmmakers.

We sat and spoke with the three brothers and actors Alain Saadi,Fouad Yammine, and Alexandra Kahwagi

Sydney at SydneysBuzz: One of my favorite scenes was when the woman’s scarf was snatched off of her in the movie scene being shot within the actual movie and how locals believed it was real and joined the staged fight. It was very much like neorealism in “The Bicycle Thief” when what was being shot on film as a mob stopping the thief was amplified by real citizens joining in and actually beating up the thief/ actor.

Mir-Jean: In the short, the film was shot in the street and a fifty, fifty-five year old woman saw the Muslim woman and the Christian man fighting and entered the scene and slapped the actor and so we put the scarf scene in the movie as well.

What are your favorite movies about movie making?

Mir-Jean: De Sica’s “After the Fox”, Woody Allen’s “Crimes and Misdemeanors”, Truffaut’s “Day for Night”, Kiarostami’s “Through the Olive Trees” , “ Living in Oblivion”. Reality and fiction is a very interesting subject, but the power of the image was the key in our film, not the making a movie within a movie.

It’s funny, “Argo” premiered in 2012 when the short was also showing. “Argo” won an Oscar and the short was compared to it.

Alexandra Kahwagi : “Living in Oblivion” and “Singing in the Rain” are my favorites.

Alain Saadeh, how do you play the characters you play?

I work from within. As a kid, I liked the sort of tough guy character. I wanted to be like a tough guy in our family. There is a neighborhood in Lebanon where they say, “Don’t make trouble, just shoot him and go home”. But aside from liking that kind of character, to get to the human side, you have to be open minded to your own inner motivations as well.

Being true to yourself leaves no room for imitation.

Mir-Jean: I tried to be true to the milieu and therefore used the same street lingo without any modification to lend the film an authentic feel. The participation of Marcel Ghanem, multi-award winning television host, helped raise the profile of the movie as well as give confidence to the cast and crew.

We did not interfere with the actors and gave them total freedom, thus giving them the space to deliver a nuanced performance.

It seemed like an anachronism to be using “film” in the movie.

The use of film in the movie was a gesture to pay homage to George Nasser, the first Lebanese in the Cannes Film Festival.

The ending seemed rather sudden and I didn’t quite understand it…

There were three endings to this movie. One was a well-developed one but this was not convincing. It was about the ultimate form of manipulation, therefore the screen went to black. The story really ends at the airport, but the movie ending as it was, was more important than the ending of the story itself. There was a transformation of the character who, in being true to himself, discovers the power of image and the power of media. He had to become either a lobbyist or a politician. The ending also said something about the nature of politics in Lebanon.

What about the film’s distribution?

After “Very Big Shot” premiered in Toronto this fall, word of mouth was good but no international sales agent was on board to make deals for these first time filmmakers. B for Film picked it up for international representation and it went on to play in Talinn and London Film Festivals.

Here in Doha, Qatar, we were thrilled by the audience’s strong and positive reception. “Very Big Shot” looks like it could do very well at the box office, not only in the Middle East and North Africa where it will be distributed by Front Row after playing Dubai and Marrakesh Film Festivals. It has already been released in Lebanon November 19 to very good attendance considering it has no names. It opened in the top four (against three Hollywood blockbusters) which proves that people are interested in home-grown cinema.

The film will earn returns on sales in North America, Europe and Latin America as well for those loving a good (if foreign-language) caper with a view into Lebanon today (did you know there has not been a president there for 18 months?).

How did you go about financing the film?

Lucien: The biggest challenge for unknown new talents is finding finance and the platform to take the film to a global audience. We thank Doha Film Institute for its support to the film and Ajyal Youth Film Festival for screening it and supporting the emerging talent.

When the short was first seen in Abu Dhabi, an investor associated with Doha came in to help and that was how we became a Doha Film Institute grant recipient. Doha’s support did more than give us the first monies; it made us count in the international film community.

I knew every financial detail had to be transparent to create a comfort zone for investors. I furnished a completion bond and a detailed budget. Four Lebanese expats in Paris invested to support Lebanese film.

Well known music composer Michel Elefterides was one of its first investors which also gave credence to the film. He had liked the short and saw its potential. He also discovered two musicians, the Chehade Brothers who played in the film and who are now best sellers in Lebanon.

The film gained from the international collaboration that came from writer George Nasser whose 1957 film “Whither?” was the only Lebanese film to make it to Cannes Film Festival and Yves Angelo. They brought Hollywood and French cinematic sensibility to the production.

This combination helped us to create a powerful script and a movie that resonates with the global audience.

We are also seeking to support filmmakers and film industry in Lebanon and the Arab World through our institute SuppAr-the Arab Art Support Group.” The Arab Art Support Group gives us and other filmmakers a support system to raise money in a sustainable, ongoing way. In effect it is a financial company created to support the arts.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Off The Shelf – Episode 71 – New DVD & Blu-ray Releases For Tuesday, November 17th 2015

This week on Off The Shelf, Ryan is joined by Brian Saur to take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the week of November 17th, 2015, and chat about some follow-up and home video news.

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Episode Links & Notes Follow-up Wireless Headphones / Bluetooth Transmitter MST3K Kickstarter Update Arrow Low-Quantity Update News Vudu Expands Warner 4K Movie Offering Upcoming Scream Factory Blu-ray Releases Twilight Time Pre-orders: Friday, November 20th New Releases The Apu Trilogy A Bullet For Joey Catch My Soul Chaplin’s Essanay Comedies The City of Lost Children The Collected Works of Hayao Miyazaki Deadliest Prey Deadly Prey Faults Faust Gatchaman The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies Extended Edition The House on Carroll Street In Cold Blood Jimmy’s Hall Living In Oblivion Man From U.N.C.L.E. Meru Pitfall Requiescant Troll / Troll 2 We’re Back! A Dinosaur
See full article at CriterionCast »

“Do You Mind If I Finance the Rest of the Film?” Tom Dicillo on Living in Oblivion

In Living in Oblivion, Tom Dicillo’s 1995 triptych of the agony and ecstasy of indie film production, Murphy’s cinematic law is in full effect. Prima donna actors. Uncooperative smoke machines. Blown lines. Soft focus. Booms in the frame. However, the film’s most soul-crushing moment comes when the camera isn’t even rolling. It arrives when the faux film’s director, played by Steve Buscemi, takes a moment to run lines with his two lead actresses. And of course — with the camera sitting idle and the cinematographer off set vomiting out-of-date milk from the meager craft services table — the scene comes […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

“Do You Mind If I Finance the Rest of the Film?” Tom Dicillo on Living in Oblivion

In Living in Oblivion, Tom Dicillo’s 1995 triptych of the agony and ecstasy of indie film production, Murphy’s cinematic law is in full effect. Prima donna actors. Uncooperative smoke machines. Blown lines. Soft focus. Booms in the frame. However, the film’s most soul-crushing moment comes when the camera isn’t even rolling. It arrives when the faux film’s director, played by Steve Buscemi, takes a moment to run lines with his two lead actresses. And of course — with the camera sitting idle and the cinematographer off set vomiting out-of-date milk from the meager craft services table — the scene comes […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Living in Oblivion

Tom Dicillo's satire about the pitfalls of low budget filmmaking is less farce than it is a loving valentine to the difficult task of getting something relevant on film. Steve Buscemi is the frustrated director, Catherine Keener the insecure actress, and Peter Dinklage the little person not pleased that he's been hired to play a phantom in a dream sequence. Hilariously clever, the show also has a big heart. Living in Oblivion Blu-ray + DVD Shout! Factory 1995 / Color & B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 92 min. / Street Date November 17, 2015 / $29.99 Starring Steve Buscemi, Catherine Keener, Dermot Mulroney, Danielle von Zerneck, James LeGros, Rica Martens. Cinematography Frank Prinzi Production Designer Stephanie Carroll, Thérèse DePrez Art Direction Janine Michelle, Scott Pask Film Editor Dana Congdon, Camilla Toniolo Original Music Jim Farmer Produced by Hilary Gilford, Michael Griffiths, Robert M. Sertner, Marcus Viscidi, Frank von Zerneck Written and Directed by Tom Dicillo

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

A charming,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: Crime Thriller 'Phantom Halo' Executive Produced By Peter Bogdanovich

Phantom Halo” tries to become a modern Shakespearean tragedy and ends up as a painfully generic family crime drama. The Shakespeare connection is not really far fetched, since Antonia Bogdanovich’s (yes, Peter Bogdanovitch’s daughter, he executive produced the film) feature directorial debut, about a family struggling to survive amidst a barrage of economic hardships, contains a father-son duo who are obsessed with the Bard. Bogdanovich’s film even begins with a run of the mill art house black-and-white dream sequence, the kind that Peter Dinklage in “Living in Oblivion” would have made fun of, as the unnecessarily dour voiceover recites the famous soliloquy from “Macbeth.” Alas, “Phantom Halo” tries to be a tale full of sound and fury, but in the end it signifies nothing. Co-written by Antonia Bogadanovich and Anne Heffron, and based on Boganovich’s short film, “My Left Hand Man,” “Phantom Halo” follows the exploits of the Emerson family.
See full article at The Playlist »

The Definitive Movies of 1995

40. Empire Records

Directed by: Allan Moyle

Ah, the coming-of-age story. There was no sub-genre more hijacked for a quick buck in the 1990′s. In between the good ones (“Dazed and Confused,” “Boyz in the Hood”), the cheesy ones (“She’s All That,” “She Drives Me Crazy”), and the under-appreciated ones (“The Man in the Moon,” “Angus”), there were the middling ones that, if anything, boasted a cast that would go on to bigger, better things. Enter “Empire Records,” which is not only a coming-of-age story, but one that takes place at a record store, no less. Talk about the double dip. The entire film takes place over the course of one day, focusing on the employees, played by Anthony Lapaglia, Ethan Embry, Renee Zellweger, Rory Cochrane, and Liv Tyler. The independent record store is in Delaware – the hot spot of American music – and sees Joe (Lapaglia) allowing night manager Lucas
See full article at SoundOnSight »

2015 Sundance Film Festival Predictions List: An Introduction

Whether you are a filmmaker, or one of the Sundance programmers whose task it is to identify the films that make up a line-up, it is indeed the most wonderful, panic-filled and nerve racking time of the year. The 31st edition of the Sundance Film Festival kicks off on January 22nd with Park City and Salt Lake City playing host to some of the more innovative, thought-provoking narrative and non-fiction films of 2015. Last year, a Jenga tall order of 4,057 features and 8,161 shorts were submitted. Now let’s think about those numbers for a second.

Twenty years ago, Terry Zwigoff’s Crumb claimed the Grand Jury Prize Documentary award, Living in Oblivion‘s Tom Dicillo was honored with the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award, and Edward Burns’ micro-budgeted The Brothers McMullen (there is a read-worthy, lively, eleventh hour account on how it was submitted to the fest in Ted Hope’s “Hope
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

James Franco To Redecorate ‘The Room’

Released in 2003, The Room carved out its own niche in movie history. Unfortunately the carving was done with the wrong end of a Swiss Army knife and it became famous for all the wrong reasons. Co-star Greg Sestero did what any good actor would do and used the experience for his own ends, co-writing The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room with Tom Bissell. But even he and director Tommy Wiseau couldn’t have foreseen the latest development – James Franco is adding to the legend by adapting the book of the film for the screen.

It’s a family affair with James playing Wiseau and his brother Dave taking the role of Sestero. Seth Rogen’s Point Grey Pictures will be bringing the chaotic chronicle of what was supposed to be a torrid celluloid love triangle to cinemas. Rogen previously worked with Franco on This Is The End
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Peter Dinklage Rocked Mullet In High School Yearbook Photo

Game of Thrones star Peter Dinklage had a full-on mullet in a picture from his 1987 high school yearbook.

Peter Dinklage's Mullet

In the late 1980s, Dinklage attended Delbarton prep school in New Jersey, where he proudly sported a mullet that had an impressive amount of volume. A Reddit user uncovered the yearbook photo of the actor with the ‘do and uploaded it for posterity. It wasn’t long before the vintage snap went viral – on imgur is has more that 1.5 million views.

Complementing the actor’s hair in the yearbook picture was his senior quote, which was by actor and writer Sam Shepard. It reads, “Words are the tools of imagery in motion.

After graduating from Delbarton in 1987, Dinklage went on to study at Bennington College, from where he graduated in 1991. While at Bennington, Dinklage apparently had some more fun with his hair. He had “long flowing hair,” Dinklage
See full article at Uinterview »

Fearnet Movie Review: 'Starry Eyes' [SXSW 2014]

  • FEARnet
Fearnet Movie Review: 'Starry Eyes' [SXSW 2014]
There are plenty of (usually independently produced) movies that take firm aim on the "eat 'em up and spit 'em out" nature of Hollywood. (My favorites are Swimming with Sharks, Living in Oblivion, The Player, and The Day of the Locust.) But while those films are satirical and often very funny deconstructions of The Hollywood Machine, the new indie horror film Starry Eyes is sort of a kick-straight-to-the nuts of the film industry.   You could probably figure out the plot of Starry Eyes if I described the film as "Faust in lower-middle class Los Angeles," but we can get just a little more specific than that: Sarah (Alexandra Essoe) is a sweet but emotionally fragile young ingenue who, like virtually everyone in Hollywood under the age of 30, dreams of being a movie star. More specifically, old-school '40s-era Hollywood stardom is what Sarah is looking for. Unfortunately the only production
See full article at FEARnet »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 1995

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 24 Oct 2013 - 06:46

Another 25 unsung greats come under the spotlight, as we provide our pick of the underappreciated films of 1995...

The year covered in this week's underrated movie rundown was significant for a number of reasons. It was the year that saw the release of Toy Story - the groundbreaking movie that would cement Pixar's reputation as an animation studio, and set the tempo for CG family movies for the next 18 years and counting. It was the year that saw James Bond (played by Pierce Brosnan for the first time) emerge for GoldenEye after a six-year break. It was also the year of Michael Mann's Heat, Dogme 95, and the moment where Terry Gilliam scored a much-deserved hit with 12 Monkeys.

As ever, we're focusing on a few of the lesser-known films from this particular year, and we've had to think carefully about what's made the cut and what hasn't.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Steve Buscemi: 'I hope people remember the shutdown in the next elections'

The Boardwalk Empire star on how the Republicans have held the Us hostage and why the pursuit of money is not a worthy goal

Dressed in dark colours and a black baseball cap, in person the 55-year-old Steve Buscemi cuts basically the same slight, rumpled figure we met a quarter-century ago in Jim Jarmusch's Mystery Train. He might be a roadie coming off a world tour. His famously exophthalmic eyes are a washed-out blue and he's tired, back home in Brooklyn after staying at his house in upstate New York. He likes to go there and hang out and do nothing, he says, maybe take a walk or do a bit of yardwork: he spent the weekend raking leaves. Self-effacing, friendly, polite, it's clear he's here under low-grade sufferance; interviews, he says in his quick, metallic, slightly strangulated way, "aren't my favourite thing to do".

He is a patient
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Steve Buscemi: 'I hope people remember the shutdown in the next elections'

The Boardwalk Empire star on how the Republicans have held the Us hostage and why the pursuit of money is not a worthy goal

Dressed in dark colours and a black baseball cap, in person the 55-year-old Steve Buscemi cuts basically the same slight, rumpled figure we met a quarter-century ago in Jim Jarmusch's Mystery Train. He might be a roadie coming off a world tour. His famously exophthalmic eyes are a washed-out blue and he's tired, back home in Brooklyn after staying at his house in upstate New York. He likes to go there and hang out and do nothing, he says, maybe take a walk or do a bit of yardwork: he spent the weekend raking leaves. Self-effacing, friendly, polite, it's clear he's here under low-grade sufferance; interviews, he says in his quick, metallic, slightly strangulated way, "aren't my favourite thing to do".

He is a patient
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Sean Young, Vincent D'Onofrio to star in new 'Tales from Beyond the Pale' terror tales

Sean Young, Vincent D'Onofrio to star in new 'Tales from Beyond the Pale' terror tales
Director Larry Fessenden’s Glass Eye Pix company has announced that season 2 of the horror-themed Tales from Beyond the Pale audio play series will be released on the suitably spooky date of Friday, Sept. 13. The second batch of terror tales was recorded live in New York and features actors Sean Young, Vincent D’Onofrio, James LeGros (Living in Oblivion, Girls), and Kate Lyn Sheil (Sun Don’t Shine), among others. “Having a season of tales already behind us, we thought it would be a fun challenge to pull back the curtain on our process and perform them live,” said filmmaker
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

Review: ‘Unmade in China’ is an Absurd Tale of American Filmmakers Working on a Chinese Movie

Documentaries about the production of a movie can go two ways. The film being filmed is completed without a hitch and the studio or distributor puts the “making of…” special on the DVD, or it’s a disastrous shoot and not exactly something executives want to flaunt in the form of a bonus feature. The latter can include docs on films that are miraculously finished (Burden of Dreams; Overnight; Hearts of Darkness) or unsurprisingly unfinished (Lost in La Mancha; It’s All True; the upcoming Death of “Superman Lives”). Either way, there’s usually good reason to isolate all that drama for a separately (or solely) released feature-length work. In the case of Unmade in China, the aim seems to have always been to cover a catastrophe. Director Gil Kofman (The Memory Thief) had already gone to the city of Xiamen to make the movie Case Sensitive, a YouTube-inspired thriller scripted by an American writer and intended
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »
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