Edit
Pinky and the Brain (TV Series 1995–1998) Poster

(1995–1998)

Trivia

Maurice LaMarche described the Brain's voice as "sixty-five percent Orson Welles, and thirty-five percent Vincent Price".
18 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the opening credits, Brain is writing a complex formula about the Universe Explained (simplified), and the resulting answer is THX 1138 (1971), the title of the first film by George Lucas.
20 of 22 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Brain's voice is based upon that of Orson Welles. The voice actor portraying Brain is Maurice LaMarche, who also portrayed Orson Welles by dubbing Vincent D'Onofrio's role as Orson Welles in the movie Ed Wood (1994).
15 of 16 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Originated as a series of segments on Animaniacs (1993) before being spun-off to its own show. It was moved to the WB's primetime line-up, where it won an Emmy. Then it was moved back to the Kids WB line-up, where it was Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain (1998) adding the familiar human character from Tiny Toon Adventures (1990). After a few episodes, it was cancelled.
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Brain's nemesis, Snowball, was named after a character in George Orwell's "Animal Farm".
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Series Producer Peter Hastings described the show as "a two hundred fifty thousand dollar inside joke on Orson Welles". The Brain was inspired by Welles, and frequently slips in tributes to Welles' work into his schemes.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Pinky and the Brain's genes were spliced using the Acme Bagel Warmer and Gene Splicer.
8 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The characters of Pinky and the Brain were unintentionally created by Bruce Timm, when creating caricatures of Producers Eddie Fitzgerald and Tom Minton.
7 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
A bootleg tape of a short-tempered (and foul-mouthed) Orson Welles arguing with a recording engineer during a voice-over session has been widely distributed. It was used as the basis for an episode of this show, with The Brain reading cleaned-up versions of Welles' rantings. The episode's title, "Yes, Always", is taken from one of Orson's complaints.
6 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Rob Paulsen modeled Pinky's voice after Frank Spencer, the main protagonist of the BBC sitcom Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em (1973).
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page


Recently Viewed