A Few Good Men (1992) Poster

Kevin Bacon: Capt. Jack Ross

Photos 

Quotes 

  • Capt. Ross : Corporal Barnes, I hold here the Marine Outline for Recruit Training. You're familiar with this book?

    Cpl. Barnes : Yes, sir.

    Capt. Ross : Have you read it?

    Cpl. Barnes : Yes, sir.

    Capt. Ross : [hands him the book]  Good. Would you turn to the chapter that deals with code reds, please?

    Cpl. Barnes : [confused]  Sir?

    Capt. Ross : Just flip to the page of the book that discusses code reds.

    Cpl. Barnes : Well, well, you see, sir code red is a term that we use. I mean, just down at Gitmo. I don't know if it's actually...

    Capt. Ross : Ah, we're in luck then. Standard Operating Procedures, Rifle Security Company, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Now, I assume we'll find the term code red and its definition in that book. Am I correct?

    Cpl. Barnes : No, sir.

    Capt. Ross : No? Corporal Barnes, I'm a Marine. Is there no book, no manual or pamphlet, no set of orders or regulations that lets me know that, as a Marine, one of my duties is to perform code reds?

    Cpl. Barnes : No, sir. No book, sir.

    Capt. Ross : No further questions.

    [as Ross walks back to his table Kaffee takes the book out of his hand] 

    Kaffee : Corporal, would you turn to the page in this book that says where the mess hall is, please?

    Cpl. Barnes : Well, Lt. Kaffee, that's not in the book, sir.

    Kaffee : You mean to say in all your time at Gitmo, you've never had a meal?

    Cpl. Barnes : No, sir. Three squares a day, sir.

    Kaffee : I don't understand. How did you know where the mess hall was if it's not in this book?

    Cpl. Barnes : Well, I guess I just followed the crowd at chow time, sir.

    Kaffee : No more questions.

  • Capt. Ross : [in a bar, after Danny just walked up to Jack's table]  Hey, Danny! Great job today. The redirect on Barnes.

    Kaffee : I have Markinson.

    Capt. Ross : Where is he?

    Kaffee : Motel room in North East with six federal marshalls outside his door. Take a sip of your drink.

    Kaffee : The transfer order that Markinson signed is a phony. Jessup's statement that the 6am flight was the first available is a lie. We're checking the tower chief's log.

    [to waitress] 

    Kaffee : I'd like a beer, please.

    [to Ross] 

    Kaffee : In the mean time I thought we'd put the Apostle John Kendrick on the stand and see if we can't have a little fun.

    Capt. Ross : Alright. I have an obligation to tell you that if you accuse Kendrick or Jessup of any crime without proper evidence then you're going to be subject to a court martial for professional misconduct and that is something that's going to be stapled to every job application that you ever fill out. Markinson's not going to hold up, Danny, he's a crazy man! Now, I'm not telling you this to intimidate you I'm being your lawyer here.

    Kaffee : Oh, thanks, Jack. And I want to tell you that I think the whole fucking bunch of you are certifiably insane! This code of honor of yours makes me want to beat the shit out of something!

    Capt. Ross : Don't you dare lump me in with Jessup and Kendrick just because we wear the same uniform. I'm your friend and I'm telling you, I don't think your clients belong in jail but I don't get to make that decision! I represent the government of the United States without passion or prejudice and my client has a case! There you go. Now I want you to acknowledge that the Judge Advocate has made you aware of the possible consequences of accusing a Marine officer of a felony without proper evidence.

    Kaffee : I've been so advised.

    Capt. Ross : You got bullied into that courtroom, Danny, by everyone. By Dawson. By Galloway. Shit, I practically dared you. You got bullied into that courtroom by the memory of a dead lawyer.

    Kaffee : [shouting as Jack leaves]  You're a lousy fucking softball player, Jack!

    Capt. Ross : Your boys are going down, Danny. I can't stop it anymore.

  • Col. Jessup : [Judge dismisses the jury after Jessep's revelation on the stand about the Code Red]  What is this? What's going on? I did my job, I'd do it again!

    [stands up defiantly] 

    Col. Jessup : I'm gonna get on a plane and go on back to my base.

    Judge Randolph : You're not going anywhere, Colonel. MP's... guard the Colonel!

    [MPs take post] 

    Judge Randolph : Captain Ross?

    Col. Jessup : What the hell is this?

    Capt. Ross : Colonel Jessup, you have the right to remain silent. Any statement you make...

    Col. Jessup : I'm being charged with a crime? Is that what this is? I'm being charged with a crime? This is funny. That's what this is. This is...

    [turning to Kaffee and lunging at him] 

    Col. Jessup : ... I'm gonna rip the eyes out of your head and piss into your dead skull! You fucked with the wrong Marine!

    Capt. Ross : Colonel Jessup! Do you understand these rights as I have just read them to you?

    Col. Jessup : [contemptuously]  You fuckin' people... you have no idea how to defend a nation. All you did was weaken a country today, Kaffee. That's all you did. You put people's lives in danger. Sweet dreams, son.

    Kaffee : Don't call me son. I'm a lawyer, and an officer in the United States Navy, and you're under arrest you son of a bitch.

    [glares at Jessup] 

    Kaffee : The witness is excused.

  • Kaffee : Lt. Kendrick, was Lance Corporal Dawson given a below average rating on this last report because you learned he had been sneaking food to Private Bell?

    Capt. Ross : Object!

    Judge Randolph : Not so fast. Lieutenant?

    Lt. Kendrick : Lance Corporal Dawson was given a below average rating because he had committed a crime.

    Kaffee : A crime? What crime did he commit? Lieutenant Kendrick, Dawson brought a hungry guy some food. What crime did he commit?

    Lt. Kendrick : He disobeyed an order.

    Kaffee : And because he did, because he exercised his own set of values, because he made a decision about the welfare of a Marine that was in conflict with an order of yours, he was punished. Is that right?

    Lt. Kendrick : Lance Corporal Dawson disobeyed an order!

    Kaffee : Yeah, but it wasn't a real order, was it? After all, it's peace time. He wasn't being asked to secure a hill or advance on a beachhead. I mean, surely a Marine of Dawson's intelligence can be trusted to determine on his own which are the really important orders and which orders might, say, be morally questionable? Lieutenant Kendrick, can he? Can Dawson determine on his own which orders he's going to follow?

    Lt. Kendrick : No, he cannot.

    Kaffee : A lesson he learned after the Curtis Bell incident, am I right?

    Lt. Kendrick : I would think so.

    Kaffee : You know so, don't you, Lieutenant?

    Capt. Ross : Object.

    Judge Randolph : Sustained.

    Kaffee : Lieutenant Kendrick, one final question. If you had ordered Dawson to give Santiago a code red...

    Lt. Kendrick : I specifically ordered those men not to touch Santiago!

    Kaffee : Is it reasonable to think he would've disobeyed you again?

    Capt. Ross : Lieutenant, don't answer that!

    Kaffee : You don't have to. I'm through.

    Capt. Ross : Lieutenant Kendrick, did you order Lance Corporal Dawson and Private Downey to give Willie Santiago a code red?

    [Kendrick initially refuses to answer, sensing he's been caught lying] 

    Capt. Ross : Lieutenant Kendrick, did you...

    Lt. Kendrick : No, I did not.

    Capt. Ross : Thank you.

  • Kaffee : Lieutenant Kendrick, in your opinion was Private Santiago a good Marine?

    Lt. Kendrick : I would say he was about average.

    Kaffee : Lieutenant, you signed three Proficiency and Conduct reports on Santiago, and in all three reports, you indicate a rating of below average.

    Lt. Kendrick : [looking through the reports he signed]  Yes, Private Santiago was below average. I did not see the need to trample on a man's grave.

    Kaffee : Well, we appreciate that, but you are under oath now, and I think as unpleasant as it may be, we'd all just as soon hear the truth.

    Lt. Kendrick : I am aware of my oath.

    Kaffee : Lieutenant, these are the last three Pro-Con reports you signed for Lance Corporal Dawson. Dawson received two marks of exceptional, but on this most recent report dated June 9th of this year, he received a rating of below average. It's this last report I'd like to discuss for a moment.

    Lt. Kendrick : That would be fine.

    Kaffee : Lance Corporal Dawson's ranking after the school of infantry was perfect. Records indicate that more than half that class has since been promoted to full Corporal while Dawson has remained a Lance Corporal. Was Dawson's promotion held up because of this last report?

    Lt. Kendrick : I'm sure it was.

    Kaffee : Do you recall why Dawson was given such a poor grade on this last report?

    Lt. Kendrick : I'm sure I don't. I have many men in my charge, Lieutenant. I write many reports.

    Kaffee : Lieutenant, do you recall an incident involving a PFC Curtis Bell who had been found stealing liquor from the Officer's Club?

    Lt. Kendrick : Yes, I do.

    Kaffee : Did you report Private Bell to the proper authorities?

    Lt. Kendrick : I have two books at my bedside, Lieutenant: the Marine Corps Code of Conduct and the King James Bible. The only proper authorities I am aware of are my commanding officer, Colonel Nathan R. Jessup, and the Lord, our God.

    Kaffee : At your request, Lieutenant, I can have the record reflect your lack of acknowledgment of this court as a proper authority.

    Capt. Ross : Objection. Argumentative.

    Judge Randolph : Sustained. Watch yourself, Counselor.

    Kaffee : Did you report Private Bell to your superiors?

    Lt. Kendrick : I remember thinking very highly of Private Bell, of not wanted to see his record tarnished by a formal charge.

    Kaffee : You preferred that it be handled within the unit.

    Lt. Kendrick : Yes, I most certainly did.

    Kaffee : Lieutenant, do you know what a Code Red is?

    Lt. Kendrick : Yes, I do.

  • Capt. Ross : Why did you go into Santiago's room?

    Galloway : The witness has rights!

    Capt. Ross : The witness has been read his rights, Commander.

    Judge Randolph : The question will be repeated.

    Galloway : Your Honor!

    Capt. Ross : Why did you go into Santiago's room?

    Downey : Hal?

    Capt. Ross : Did Lance Corporal Dawson tell you to give Santiago a Code Red?

    Downey : Hal?

    Capt. Ross : Don't look at him!

    Dawson : Hal?

    Dawson : Private, answer the captain's question!

    Downey : Yes, Captain, I was given an order by my squad leader, Lance Corporal Harold W. Dawson, United States Marine Corps, and I followed it.

  • Capt. Ross : Your honor, it's become obvious that Lt. Kaffee's intention this afternoon are to smear a high ranking Marine officer in the desperate hope that the mere appearance of impropriety will win him points with the court members. Now, it is my recommendation, sir, that Lt. Kaffee be reprimanded for his conduct and that this witness be excused with the court's deepest apologies.

    Judge Randolph : [from the judge's bench]  Overruled.

    Capt. Ross : Your honor...

    Judge Randolph : [from the judge's bench]  Your objection is noted.

  • [last lines, after court has adjourned for the day] 

    Capt. Ross : I'll see you around campus. I gotta go arrest Kendrick.

    Kaffee : Tell him I say hi.

    Capt. Ross : Will do.

  • Capt. Ross : [confirming Danny's bluff to Jessup after court has adjourned for the day]  Airmen Cecil O'Malley and Anthony Rodriguez, what exactly were these guys going to testify to?

    Kaffee : Unless I'm mistaken, they were both going to testify under oath that they had absolutely no recollection of anything.

    Capt. Ross : [sarcastically]  Strong witnesses.

    Kaffee : [jokingly]  And handsome too, didn't you think?

  • [In the film edited for TV on NBC dubbed in the Modified Version. Judge Randolph dismisses the jury after Jessup's revelation on the stand about the Code Red] 

    Col. Jessup : What the hell is this? Colonel, what's going on? I did my job. I'd do it again. I'm gonna get on a plane and go on back to my base.

    Judge Randolph : You're not going anywhere, Colonel. MP's, guard the Colonel.

    M.P. : Yes, sir.

    [MP's take to the post. And Col. Jessup find out what's going on] 

    Judge Randolph : Captain Ross.

    Col. Jessup : What the hell is these?

    Capt. Ross : Colonel Jessup, you have the right to remain silent; Any statement you make may be used against you in a trial by court-martial or in other judicial or administrative proceedings. You have the right to consult with a lawyer prior any further questions. This lawyer may be a civilian lawyer retained by you at your own expense...

    Col. Jessup : I'm being charged with a crime? Is that what this is? I'm being charged with a crime? This is funny. That's what this is...

    [Turning to Kaffee and lunging at him. But the MP's restrain Colonel Jessup] 

    Col. Jessup : ... I'm gonna rip the eyes out of your head and puke into your dead skull, you messed with the wrong marine!

    Capt. Ross : Colonel Jessup, do you understand these rights as I have just read them to you?

    Col. Jessup : You friggin' people. You have no idea how to defend the nation. All you did was weaken a country today, Kaffee. That's all you did. You put people's lives in danger. Sweet dreams, son,

    Kaffee : Don't call me son. I'm a lawyer, and an officer in the United States Navy, and you're under arrest, you son of a bitch.

    [Glares at Jessup] 

    Kaffee : The witness is excused.

    [Colonel Jessup calms down, taking a deep breath to cool off, bend down and grab his hat on the floor, and MP's taken Colonel Jessup away into custody] 

  • Kaffee : [getting Jack's attention while his playing basketball]  Jack? Jack! They were given an order.

    Capt. Ross : [to his friends]  I'll be right back. I'll be right back.

    Galloway : How long have you known about the order?

    Capt. Ross : [walking away from the basketball court]  I didn't. Who's this?

    Kaffee : She's Jo Galloway. She's Downey's attorney. She's very pleased to meet you.

    Capt. Ross : [talking privately]  What exactly are you accusing me of, Commander?

    Galloway : How long have you known about the order?

    Kaffee : Jack didn't know about the order because if Jack did and he didn't tell us Jack knows he'd be violating about 14 articles of the Code of Ethics. As it is, Jack's got enough to worry about because, God forbid, our clients should decide to plead not guilty and testify for the record that they were given an order.

    Capt. Ross : Kendrick specifically told those men not to touch Santiago.

    Kaffee : That's right and then he went into Dawson and Downey's room and specifically ordered them to give Santiago a code red.

    Capt. Ross : That's not what Kendrick says.

    Kaffee : Kendrick's lying.

    Capt. Ross : You have proof?

    Kaffee : I have the defendants.

    Capt. Ross : And I have 23 Marines who aren't accused of murder and a Lieutenant with 4 letters of commendation.

    Kaffee : Why did Markinson go UA?

    Capt. Ross : You'll never know.

    Kaffee : You think I can't subpoena Markinson?

    Capt. Ross : You can try but you won't find him. You know what Markinson did for the first 17 of his 26 years in the Corps? Counterintelligence. Markinson's gone; there is no Markinson. Look, Danny, Jessup's star is on the rise. Division will give me a lot of room on this one to spare Jessup and the Corps any embarrassment.

    Kaffee : How much room?

    Capt. Ross : I'll knock it all down to involuntary manslaughter, two years they'll be home in six months.

    Galloway : No deal, we're going to court.

    Capt. Ross : No, you're not.

    Galloway : Why not?

    Capt. Ross : Because you'll lose and Danny knows it. And Danny also knows that if it does go to court then that means I'm going to have to go all the way. His clients are going to get charged with the whole truckload. Murder. Conspiracy. Conduct unbecoming. And even though he's got me by the balls out here Danny knows that in a court room he loses this case. You see, Danny's an awfully talented lawyer and he's not about to let his clients go to jail for life when he knows that they could be home in six months. That's the end of this negotiation. I'll see you tomorrow morning at the arraignment.

  • Kaffee : [just seconds before the trial starts]  Last chance. I'll flip you for it.

    Bailiff : All rise.

    Capt. Ross : Too late.

  • Kaffee : Private, I want you to tell us one last time. Why did you go to Private Santiago's room on the night of September 6th?

    Downey : A code red was ordered by my platoon commander, Lieutenant Jonathan James Kendrick.

    Kaffee : Thank you. Your witness.

    Capt. Ross : Private, the week of 2 September... the switch log has you down at Post 39 until 1600. Is that correct?

    Downey : I'm sure it is, sir. They keep that log pretty good.

    Capt. Ross : How far is it from Post 39 to the Windward Barracks?

    Downey : Well, it's a ways, sir. It's a hike.

    Capt. Ross : About how far by jeep?

    Downey : About ten, fifteen minutes, sir.

    Capt. Ross : You ever have to walk it?

    Downey : Yes, sir. That day, sir. Friday. The pick up private - Tthat's like what we call the guy who drops us off at our post and picks us up... also 'cause he can get girls in New York City. The pickup private got a flat, sir, right at 39. He pulled up and, bam, blowout with no spare. So we had to double-time it back to the barracks.

    Capt. Ross : And if it's about ten or fifteen minutes by Jeep, I'm guessing... it must be a good hour by foot, am I right?

    Downey : Pickup and me did it in forty-five flat, sir.

    Capt. Ross : Not bad. Now, you've said that your assault on Private Santiago was the result of an order that Lieutenant Kendrick gave you in your barracks room at... 1620, am I right?

    Downey : Yes, sir.

    Capt. Ross : But you just said that you didn't make it back to the Windward barracks until 1645.

    Downey : [confused]  Sir?

    Capt. Ross : Well, if you didn't make it back to the barracks room until 1645, how could you be in your room at 1620?

    Downey : [nervously]  Well, you see, sir, there was a blow out.

    Capt. Ross : Private, did you ever actually hear Lieutenant Kendrick order a code red?

    Downey : [nervously]  Well, Hal said that...

    Capt. Ross : Private, did you ever actually hear Lieutenant Kendrick order a code red?

    Downey : No, sir.

    Galloway : [stands up from the defense table]  Please the court, I'd like to request a recess in order to confer with my client.

  • Kaffee : Colonel, Lt. Kendrick ordered the Code Red because *that's* what you told Lt. Kendrick to do!

    Capt. Ross : *Object!*

    Judge Randolph : [from the judge's bench]  Sustained!

    Kaffee : And when it went bad, you cut these guys *loose!*

    Capt. Ross : Your honor!

    Kaffee : You doctored the log book!...

    Capt. Ross : *Damn it, Kaffee!*

  • Kaffee : Lieutenant, do you know what a code red is?

    Lt. Kendrick : Yes, I do.

    Kaffee : Have you ever ordered a code red?

    Lt. Kendrick : No, I have not.

    Kaffee : Lieutenant, did you order Dawson and two other men to make sure that Private Bell receive no food or drink except water for a period of seven days?

    Lt. Kendrick : That is a distortion of the truth, Lieutenant. Private Bell was placed on barracks restriction. He was given water and vitamin supplements, and I can assure you that at no time was his health in danger.

    Kaffee : [sarcastic]  I'm sure it was lovely for Private Bell. But you did order the barracks restriction, didn't you? You did order the denial of food.

    Lt. Kendrick : Yes, I did.

    Kaffee : Wouldn't this form of discipline be considered a code red?

    Lt. Kendrick : No.

    Kaffee : If I called the other 478 Marines from Guantanamo Bay to testify, would they consider it a code red?

    Capt. Ross : If it please the court, the witness can't possibly testify as to what 478 other men would say. Now, we object to this entire line of questioning as argumentative and irrelevant badgering of the witness.

    Judge Randolph : The government's objection is sustained, Lieutenant Kaffee, and I would remind you that you are now questioning a Marine officer with an impeccable service record.

    Capt. Ross : Thank you, Your Honor.

  • Capt. Ross : [upon entering Danny's office]  Dan Kaffee.

    Kaffee : Smilin' Jack Ross.

    Capt. Ross : Welcome to the big time.

    Kaffee : You think so?

    Capt. Ross : Let's hope for Dawson and Downey's sake that you practice law better than you play softball.

    Kaffee : Unfortunately for Dawson and Downey, I don't do anything better than I play softball. I'm out of here, Janelle!

    Janelle : Bye!

    Kaffee : See you when I get back from Cuba.

    Janelle : [playfully, sarcastically]  Say hi to Castro for me.

    Kaffee : Will do. What are we looking at?

    Capt. Ross : They plead guilty, we drop the conspiracy and the conduct unbecoming. Twenty years, they're home in half that time.

    Kaffee : I want twelve.

    Capt. Ross : Can't do it.

    Kaffee : They called the ambulance, Jack.

    Capt. Ross : Look, I don't care if they called the Avon lady. They killed a Marine.

    Kaffee : Rag was tested for poison. The autopsy, the lab reports, all say the same thing, maybe, maybe not.

    Capt. Ross : The Chief of Internal Medicine for the Guantanamo Bay Naval Hospital says he's sure.

    Kaffee : What do you know about code reds?

    Capt. Ross : Oh, man. We off the record?

    Kaffee : You tell me.

    Capt. Ross : Look, I'm going to give you the twelve years. Before you get yourself into any trouble tomorrow, I think you should know that the platoon commander, Lieutenant Jonathan Kendrick, held a meeting with the men and specifically told them not to touch Santiago.

    Kaffee : We still playing hoops tomorrow night?

    Capt. Ross : We got a deal?

    Kaffee : I'll talk to you when I get back.

  • Capt. Ross : [the prosecution's opening statement]  the facts of the case are these: on midnight of September sixth the accused entered the barracks room of their platoon mate PFC. William Santiago, they woke him up tied his arms and legs with tape and forced a rag into his throat, a few minutes later a chemical reaction called Lactic Acidosis caused his lungs to begin bleeding, he drowned in his own blood and was pronounced dead at thirty seven minutes pass midnight. These are the facts of the case and they are undisputed. The story I've just told you is the exact same story you're going to hear from lance corporal Dawson and it's going to be the exact same story you're going to hear from private Downey, furthermore the government will demonstrate the accused soaked the rag in poison and entered Santiago's room with the intent to kill, their attorney lieutenant Kaffee is going to pull off a little "magic act" he's going to try a little misdirection he's going to astonish you with stories and rituals and dazzle you with official sounding terms like "code red", he might even cut in a few officers for you. He'll have no evidence mind you none but its going to be entertaining. And when we get the end, all the "magic" in the world will not have divert your attention to the fact that Willie Santiago is dead and Dawson and Downey killed him. These are the facts of the case and they are undisputed.

  • Kaffee : [to the court while Jessup is on the witness stand, eventually reading a list of Santiago's belongings]  After Dawson and Downey's arrest on the night of the sixth, Santiago's barracks room was sealed off and its contents inventoried: four pairs, camouflaged pants, three long sleeve kaki shirts, three pairs of boots, four pairs green socks, three OD green t-shirts.

    Capt. Ross : Please the court, is there a question anywhere in our future?

  • Capt. Ross : were you present at a meeting held on the afternoon of September sixth with the members of the second platoon?

    Cpl. Carl Hammaker : yes sir

    Capt. Ross : would you tell the court the substance of that meeting?

    Cpl. Carl Hammaker : Lieutenant Kendrick told us we had a informer in our group, that Private Santiago had gone outside the chain of command and reported to the NIS a member of our platoon

    Capt. Ross : did that make you mad?

    Cpl. Carl Hammaker : [remains silent] 

    Capt. Ross : you can tell the truth Corporal, it's alright, did that make you mad?

    Cpl. Carl Hammaker : yes sir

    Capt. Ross : how mad?

    Cpl. Carl Hammaker : Private Santiago betrayed a code we believe in very deeply sir

    Capt. Ross : were the other members of the squad angry?

    Kaffee : object, speculation

    Capt. Ross : were Dawson and Downey?

    Kaffee : please the court, is the government counsel honestly asking this witness to testify to as to how my clients felt on September sixth?

    Judge Randolph : sustained

    Capt. Ross : Corporal, did Lieutenant Kendrick leave a standing order at that meeting?

    Cpl. Carl Hammaker : yes sir

    Capt. Ross : what was it?

    Cpl. Carl Hammaker : well it was clear that he didn't want us taking matters in our own hands

    Capt. Ross : what was the order?

    Cpl. Carl Hammaker : Sir, he said Santiago wasn't to be touched.

    Capt. Ross : [to Danny]  your witness

    Kaffee : were you in Dawson and Downey's room five minutes after this meeting?

    Cpl. Carl Hammaker : no, sir

    Kaffee : thanks, I have no more questions.

  • Kaffee : name some reasons why a Marine would relieve a code red?

    Cpl. Barnes : [while on the witness stand]  being late for platoon or company meetings, keeping his barracks in disorder, falling back on a run.

    Kaffee : have you ever received a code red?

    Cpl. Barnes : yes sir, we were doing seven man assault drills and my weapon slipped. It was just so it was over a hundred degrees and my palms were sweaty and I forgot to use the resin like we were taught

    Kaffee : what happened?

    Cpl. Barnes : that night the guys in my squad threw a blanket over me, took turns punching me in the arm for five minutes, then they poured glue in my hands and it worked too because I ain't dropped my weapon since

    Kaffee : was Private Santiago late for platoon meetings?

    Cpl. Barnes : yes sir

    Kaffee : were his barracks ever in disorder?

    Cpl. Barnes : yes sir

    Kaffee : did he ever fall back on a run?

    Cpl. Barnes : all the time sir

    Kaffee : did "ever" prior to the night of September sixth ever receive a code red?

    Cpl. Barnes : no sir

    Kaffee : never?

    Cpl. Barnes : no sir

    Kaffee : you got a code red because your palms are sweaty

    Kaffee : why didn't Santiago, this burden to his unit, ever get one?

    Cpl. Barnes : Dawson wouldn't allow it sir

    Kaffee : [looking at the jury]  Dawson wouldn't allow it

    Cpl. Barnes : the guys talked tough about Santiago but they wouldn't go near him, they were too afraid of Dawson sir

    Capt. Ross : object, the witness is speculating

    Kaffee : I'll rephrase, Jeffery did you ever want to give Santiago a code red?

    Cpl. Barnes : yes sir

    Kaffee : why didn't you

  • Capt. Ross : [while cross examining Dr. Stone in court]  Dr. Stone you've held the license to practice medicine for seventeen years, your board certified in internal medicine, you are Chief of Internal Medicine at a hospital which serves five thousand, four hundred and twenty six people. In your professional medical opinion, was Willie Santiago poisoned?

  • Capt. Ross : [to the Judge]  Docket number 411275 VR-5. The United States versus Harold W. Dawson and Private First Class Louden Downey. The accused are charged with murder, conspiracy to commit murder and conduct of a United States Marine

    Judge Randolph : does the defense wish to enter a plea?

    Kaffee : [while standing up]  yeah, they're not guilty

    Judge Randolph : enter a plea of not guilty for the accused, we will adjourn until ten hundred, three weeks from today, at which this general court martial will reconvene

  • Capt. Ross : [repeated line, swearing in the witness]  Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you'll give this general court martial will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth so help you God?

  • Capt. Ross : And now we'll never know, will we Mr., Maguire?

    Robert C. McGuire : No.

    Capt. Ross : No more questions.

  • Capt. Ross : Mr. Maguire can you raise your right hand please? Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you'll give this general court martial will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth so help you God?

    Robert C. McGuire : I do

    Capt. Ross : have a seat please sir

    Capt. Ross : would you state your full name and occupation for the record?

    Robert C. McGuire : [on the witness stand]  Robert C. Maguire special agent, Naval Investigative Service

    Capt. Ross : thank you, Mr. Maguire did your office receive a letter from a PFC William Santiago on three September on this year?

    Robert C. McGuire : we did

    Capt. Ross : what did that letter say?

    Robert C. McGuire : that a member of Private Santiago's unit had illegally fired his weapon over the fence line

    Capt. Ross : was that Marine identified in the letter?

    Robert C. McGuire : no, I notified the barracks CO Colonel Jessup that I would be coming down to investigate

    Capt. Ross : and what did you find?

    Robert C. McGuire : the shift only reported one Marine returned his weapon with a round of ammunition missing

    Capt. Ross : who was that?

    Robert C. McGuire : Lance Corporal Harold Dawson

    Capt. Ross : [to Danny]  your witness

    Kaffee : Mr. Maguire did you question Lance Corporal Dawson about the fence line shooting?

    Robert C. McGuire : yes, he "claims" to have been engaged by some manner by the enemy

    Kaffee : but you don't believe him?

    Robert C. McGuire : it's not my place to...

    Kaffee : [interrupts him]  Lance Corporal Dawson's been charged with a number of crimes, why wasn't he charged with firing at the enemy without cause?

    Robert C. McGuire : there wasn't enough evidence to support such a charge.

    Kaffee : thank you

    Capt. Ross : Mr. Maguire, I don't understand what you mean when you say, "there wasn't enough evidence to support such a charge," you had William Santiago's letter

    Robert C. McGuire : Santiago was the only eyewitness. I never had the chance to interview him so I don't know what he saw

  • Capt. Ross : Mr. Maguire can you raise your right hand please? Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you'll give this general court martial will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth so help you God?

    Robert C. McGuire : [before sitting down]  I do

    Capt. Ross : have a seat please sir, would you state your full name and occupation for the record?

    Robert C. McGuire : Robert C. Maguire special agent, Naval Investigative Service

    Capt. Ross : thank you, Mr. Maguire did your office receive a letter from a PFC William Santiago on three September on this year?

    Robert C. McGuire : we did

    Capt. Ross : what did that letter say?

    Robert C. McGuire : that a member of Private Santiago's unit had illegally fired his weapon over the fence line

    Capt. Ross : was that Marine identified in the letter?

    Robert C. McGuire : no, I notified the barracks CO Colonel Jessup that I would be coming down to investigate

    Capt. Ross : and what did you find?

    Robert C. McGuire : the shift only reported one Marine returned his weapon with a round of ammunition missing

    Capt. Ross : who was that?

    Robert C. McGuire : Lance Corporal Harold Dawson

    Capt. Ross : [to Danny]  your witness

    Kaffee : Mr. Maguire did you question Lance Corporal Dawson about the fence line shooting?

    Robert C. McGuire : yes, he "claims" to have been engaged in some manner by the enemy

    Kaffee : but you don't believe him?

    Robert C. McGuire : it's not my place to...

    Kaffee : [interrupts him]  Lance Corporal Dawson's been charged with a number of crimes, why wasn't he charged with firing at the enemy without cause?

    Robert C. McGuire : there wasn't enough evidence to support such a charge.

    Kaffee : thank you

    Capt. Ross : Mr. Maguire, I don't understand what you mean when you say, "there wasn't enough evidence to support such a charge," you had William Santiago's letter.

    Robert C. McGuire : Santiago was the only eyewitness. I never had the chance to interview him so I don't know what he saw.

See also

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