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All 21 Pixar Movies Ranked, Worst to Best (Photos)

  • The Wrap
TheWrap’s film critic Alonso Duralde rates all the Pixar animation studio’s features:

20. Cars 2 (2011) “They should let people see the movie for free,” one pundit opined, “since Disney will make all their money back on the bedsheets.” Some of Pixar’s best movies are sequels, but this follow-up to an already inferior studio entry seemed like nothing but a craven bid for more merchandising money. The results were good for shareholders but middling for moviegoers.

19. Cars (2006) Never underestimate little boys and their love for automobiles. This brightly colored but dramatically flat tale is most enjoyed by a) male moviegoers who b) saw it before they turned 10 and c) have no idea that it tells virtually the same story as the Michael J. Fox comedy “Doc Hollywood.”

18. Cars 3 (2017) It’s a movie about middle age and the fear of obsolescence — you know, for kids! While Lightning (Owen Wilson
See full article at The Wrap »

Asher Trailer: Ron Perlman Is a Badass Assassin on the Verge of Retirement

Asher Trailer: Ron Perlman Is a Badass Assassin on the Verge of Retirement
Those holding out hope that Ron Perlman would finally return as the Right Hand of Doom in Guillermo Del Toro's Hellboy 3 were dealt a deathblow when it was decided that Lionsgate would reboot the franchise instead, bringing in Stranger Things star David Harbour to play Big Red. Well, now fans are being offered a little bit of relief with the news that Ron Perlman is returning to the big screen as a badass hitman for hire who's about to retire in Asher.

Momentum Pictures has released a trailer and first look poster for Asher, which shows off Ron Perlman's very special skills as a trained killer. The thriller hits theaters on December 7 of this year. And for those agoraphobics out there that dread stepping foot in the local cinema, the action drama will also be getting a simultaneous release on VOD and Digital HD.

Michael Caton-Jones is directing Asher
See full article at MovieWeb »

Michael J. Fox on Parkinson’s, Overcoming Fear and the Race for a Cure

  • Variety
Michael J. Fox on Parkinson’s, Overcoming Fear and the Race for a Cure
It’s a cool june afternoon in New York and Michael J. Fox is sitting in his Upper East Side office, his dog, Gus, a lumbering rescue mutt — Great Dane, hound, Chow, some Lab — napping underfoot. The pale gray walls are decorated with rustic signs from some of Fox’s favorite vacation spots — Vermont, Martha’s Vineyard — and a photo of Fox and Boston Bruins hockey great Bobby Orr is propped up on a bookshelf, along with Fox’s Emmys and Golden Globes and his Grammy award for spoken word album, an adaptation of his 2009 memoir “Always Looking Up: The Adventures of an Incurable Optimist.”

Fox, who is being honored by Variety as philanthropist of the year for his work on Parkinson’s disease research, is deeply optimistic at 57. A military brat raised on various bases across Canada, Fox was a plucky, free-spirited kid, prone to recklessness and adventure. At school and at home,
See full article at Variety »

We Have to Talk About George Hamilton in “Doc Hollywood”

George Hamilton has a very piercing stare, which makes for a great character in many movies since he can pin someone with his gaze and seem extremely authoritative while doing it. In Doc Hollywood was arguably one of his best roles since he played a straight up jerk but was at least honest in the role. There have been other roles that he’s been either good or great in but this one was kind of able to top them all since it’s brief and it’s a lead-in to one of the most meaningful parts of the movie. After all it’s

We Have to Talk About George Hamilton in “Doc Hollywood
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Woody Harrelson talks War for the Planet of the Apes and his passion for the environment

  • Cineplex
Woody Harrelson talks War for the Planet of the Apes and his passion for the environmentWoody Harrelson talks War for the Planet of the Apes and his passion for the environmentDebra Wallace - Cineplex Magazine7/11/2017 10:18:00 Am

When Woody Harrelson was first offered a major part in War for the Planet of the Apes, he had visions of stepping into the skin of a primate.

Then he realized he was being asked to play the Colonel, an iron-fisted, ruthless soldier brought in to tamp down the now hyper-intelligent apes waging war with mankind.

The 55-year-old actor admits he was a bit chagrined. “I tried anything and everything to get them to come around, but they told me I was playing a human,” he explains, tongue in cheek, during a recent chat at a posh Manhattan hotel. Dressed in a blue T-shirt and hoodie, he’s approachable and irreverent. “I
See full article at Cineplex »

TV Rewind: The 9 Shows That Defined 1990, From ‘Twin Peaks’ to ‘Wings’

The year 1990 was the beginning of a new decade that just had survived the neon excesses of the ’80s. This fresh start was seen in the world at large with the reunification of Germany, the unification of Yemen, the release of Nelson Mandela and the resignation of Margaret Thatcher as the U.K.’s prime minister.

It was also the fledgling days of the internet, when the first web server was created, providing a foundation for the World Wide Web as we know it.

Read More: ‘Animaniacs’ Reboot Being Developed by Steven Spielberg, Amblin TV and Warner Bros. — Exclusive

Over on television, “Saturday Night Live” welcomed the new talents of Chris Farley, Tim Meadows, Chris Rock, Adam Sandler, Rob Schneider and Julia Sweeney.

The year also marked the end of an era for shows like “Alf,” “227,” “Newhart,” primetime soap “Falcon Crest,” Nickelodeon’s slime purveyor “You Can’t Do That on Television,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Of The Best – The Greatest Cinematographers and the Films that made them great

Author: Dave Roper

So, we come to the end of this particular series. We’ve covered a number of aspects of the creative input into film-making, including actors, actresses, writers composers, and directors (in two parts). We’ve stopped short of costume, make-up, special effects, art design and others, however our final stop is Cinematography. The Dop exerts plenty of influence over the look of the film. Yes, lighting, production design and the director’s vision are key too, but the consistency and persistence with which certain directors stick with and return to a trusted Dop shows just how much they contribute.

Darius KhondjiSeven

Seven has a unique visual aesthetic. Plenty of films have gone for the “always raining, always dark” approach, but contrast Seven with something like AvP: Requiem for a shining example of how hard it is to pull off effectively. And contrast is the word. Seven
See full article at HeyUGuys »

DVD Review – Urban Hymn (2015)

Urban Hymn, 2015.

Directed by Michael Caton-Jones.

Starring Shirley Henderson, Letitia Wright, Isabella Laughland, Steven Mackintosh, and Ian Hart.

Synopsis :

Set against a backdrop of the 2011 UK summer riots, a determined social worker encourages a young offender to develop her singing talent.

Urban Hymn is a drama certainly singing from a worthy enough song sheet. The film details the sort of youthful (and not so youthful) rage, delinquent activity and anti-social lawlessness that marked much of the UK riots of summer 2011. It aims to bring a clear sense that this sort of rage needs to be understood and the disenfranchised need to be inspired to do something more productive with their time other than looting and robbing. It’s only partially successful in this, getting bogged down by a fairly old-fashioned style of formatting and direction. Michael Caton-Jones (Rob Roy, Doc Hollywood) is an experienced director, but this picture has a fairly flat-footed delivery when,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Ranking every Pixar film so far

I’m hardly the only one to think of this, but with Pixar putting their new film Inside Out into theatrical release today, what better time is there to rank all of their works to date? I’ve obviously seen all 15 films, from Toy Story and A Bug’s Life all the way to this week’s Inside Out. Again, with a list/ranking, my take is not the definitive one, so just keep that in mind. Especially with Pixar, everyone has a different favorite. I do hope you enjoy my version though, and remember not to miss Inside Out, which is a real special flick of theirs… Here now is how I’d rank every Pixar movie so far: 15. Cars – Not a bad film, per say, but a strangely un Pixar-like outing. By and large, this follows the same beats as Doc Hollywood, which I much prefer. Here, it
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Michael Caton-Jones to direct The Giant Under The Snow

  • ScreenDaily
Michael Caton-Jones to direct The Giant Under The Snow
Director of The Jackel and Memphis Belle joins $30m fantasy epic.

Michael Caton-Jones has been confirmed to direct $30.9m (£20m) children’s fantasy film The Giant Under The Snow.

The film will be an adaptation of a 1968 adventure novel by John Gordon, which centres on three school friends who discover an ancient treasure and become embroiled in the final act of an epic battle of good against evil.

The live-action feature is intended to act as the first in a trilogy, with shooting planned at Pinewood and Shepperton Studios as well as on location in the UK from October 2015. Theatrical release is planned for Christmas 2016.

VFX will be handled by London-based CineSite, which worked on the Harry Potter franchise and more recently handled Tom Cruise’s Edge of Tomorrow.

Caton-Jones is developing the screenplay with Tom Williams (Chalet Girl, Kajaki).

Ralph Kamp, former Icon Productions CEO, will likely be global sales and distribution agent through his outfit
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Ted Danson explains the secret to comedy, why actors keep working

Ted Danson explains the secret to comedy, why actors keep working
Ahead of CSI's Sept. 28 season premiere (10 p.m. Et on CBS), Ted Danson joined EW's Kyle Anderson for a SiriusXM Town Hall to talk about his lengthy career. Listen to two highlights below. In the first clip, after an audience member asks him about being mocked on Seinfeld (he has neither as much money as George Costanza thought he had, nor a plane), Danson reveals the secret to comedy: "I've discovered that you don't have to be the one telling the joke. As long as you're in the room with funny, you get credit for funny," he says. Thinking back
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

Revisiting Star Trek Tng: Transfigurations

The Enterprise rescues a mysterious patient in this week's Star Trek: Tng look-back. Here's James' take on Transfigurations...

This review contains spoilers.

3.25 Transfigurations

The Enterprise is enjoying some quiet time (Picard's phrase, not mine) so Geordie and Worf are hanging out in Ten Forward. Geordi is trying to catch the attention of Christy Henshaw, but is too shy to go and talk to her. When La Forge tries to stop Worf staring, Worf advises him that "you must let her see the fire in your eyes" - apparently oblivious to Geordi's lack of visible eyes.

This awkwardness is interrupted when Riker calls Geordi away, and the two head to a planet to investigate a crashed vessel. It's an escape pod with one badly injured survivor. They need to transport him to the ship, but his brain is too damaged and can't take the strain. Crusher rigs up the tricorder to
See full article at Den of Geek »

'The Michael J. Fox Show' Plans 'Back to the Future' Reunion

'The Michael J. Fox Show' Plans 'Back to the Future' Reunion
Michael J. Fox is going back to the future on an upcoming episode his NBC sitcom The Michael J. Fox Show. Christopher Lloyd, who played Dr. Emmett Brown opposite Fox's Marty McFly in Back to the Future and its two sequels, will guest-star in an episode next spring according to The Hollywood Reporter. This time around, Lloyd will appear as the principal of the high school where Annie Henry (Betsy Brandt), the wife of Fox's character Mike Henry, is employed.

The Michael J. Fox Show and Nine More New Shows
See full article at Rolling Stone »

R.I.P. Marc Merson

Oscar- and Emmy-nominated producer Marc Merson died Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 82. Merson is best known for producing the features Doc Hollywood, The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter and Leadbelly. On the TV side he produced several series including Kaz and We’ll Get By and TV movies Riding High and Hickey. He received an Oscar nomination in 1970 for producing the short People Soup, starring Alan Arkin. In the 1960s, he produced a musical version of Shaw’s Androcles And The Lion with songs by Richard Rodgers for NBC and the Emmy-nominated The Love Song Of Barney Kempinski, scripted by Murray Shisgal and starring Arkin, for the ABC Stage 67 series.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Review: NBC's 'The Michael J. Fox Show' & CBS' 'The Crazy Ones'

  • Hitfix
Review: NBC's 'The Michael J. Fox Show' & CBS' 'The Crazy Ones'
Robin Williams and Michael J. Fox became TV stars about four years apart, Williams with "Mork & Mindy" and Fox with "Family Ties." They made their first big movies about five years apart, Williams with "Popeye," Fox with "Back to the Future." The movie business took much longer to figure out how to harness Williams' unique gifts, but he's worked steadily and topped call sheets for decades. Marty McFly was instantly a perfect film role for Fox, but his run as a successful leading man only ran a few years, up through "Doc Hollywood," before he starred in some flops, went...
See full article at Hitfix »

Top 10 Actors Who Almost Voiced Disney Animated Characters

 

Before the advent of Pixar, Walt Disney Animation Studios was the leader in quality family entertainment. Now that they're both a part of the same company, it's even better. But back then, the Disney Company attempted to differentiate their movies by asking different famous actors to come in and perform their characters in a film. Inspired by Robin Williams' fantastic performance as the Genie in Aladdin, Disney Feature Animation (at the time) decided to get more ambitious with their casting. These are ten actors who were asked to be a part of a film and never got to make it; either due to scheduling conflicts, money issues or even death!

10. Joe Pesci as Mushu in Mulan

In a weird form of typecasting, Academy Award-winner Joe Pesci was originally cast as the little dragon, Mushu. After a few tries at the character, the filmmakers just felt his voice wasn't appropriate
See full article at GeekTyrant »

The great Christmas challenge: 12 hours of festive films

Movies24 is now scheduling back-to-back low-end Christmas films. What would happen when I went on a watching bender?

It's only November, but already film channel Movies 24 has transformed itself into Christmas 24. It now broadcasts nothing but Christmas films. Not classic Christmas films, either – these are all TV movies and Hallmark specials and straight-to-dvd anomalies.

It's enough to test even the most committed Christmas fan, so I set myself a challenge. Could I watch 12 straight hours of Christmas 24 without losing my mind? Here's a chronology of my travails.

9am-11am: Christmas Mail (2010)

A put-upon postman falls in love with a woman drafted in to answer all of Santa's letters. It sounds sweet, but in reality the woman can't get through a single line without giggling or staring vacantly into space, and the postman is the legal guardian of an annoying big-toothed orphan who likes to call spaghetti "missghetti". It's basically a big will-they-won't-they story.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The great Christmas challenge: 12 hours of festive films

Movies24 is now scheduling back-to-back low-end Christmas films. What would happen when I went on a watching bender?

It's only November, but already film channel Movies 24 has transformed itself into Christmas 24. It now broadcasts nothing but Christmas films. Not classic Christmas films, either – these are all TV movies and Hallmark specials and straight-to-dvd anomalies.

It's enough to test even the most committed Christmas fan, so I set myself a challenge. Could I watch 12 straight hours of Christmas 24 without losing my mind? Here's a chronology of my travails.

9am-11am: Christmas Mail (2010)

A put-upon postman falls in love with a woman drafted in to answer all of Santa's letters. It sounds sweet, but in reality the woman can't get through a single line without giggling or staring vacantly into space, and the postman is the legal guardian of an annoying big-toothed orphan who likes to call spaghetti "missghetti". It's basically a big will-they-won't-they story.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Av Room: Cars 2 3D Blu-Ray Combo Pack

Cars 2 3D Blu-Ray Combo Pack Walt Disney Home Entertainment 2011/Rated G/Running Time 106 Mins List Price: $49.99 – Available November 1, 2011 Pixar Animation's seventh feature, 2006's Cars was perhaps their first film that didn't work for me. I didn't hate their tale of a hotshot race car who hits a detour and ends up stranded in a small town, but it was perhaps the first time I felt disappointed by their efforts. A few years earlier, when the project was announced, it seemed like a weird premise – an animated film set in a world populated by anthropomorphic motor vehicles – but I always saw John Lasseter as a genius and if anyone could pull it off, it would be him. Or so I thought. Lasseter made an entertaining and visually impressive feature, yet the story was lacking and to the experienced moviegoer it felt like a remake of the 1991 Michael J. Fox vehicle Doc Hollywood.
See full article at LRM Online »

Blu-Ray Review: The Frighteners – Early Confirmation of Peter Jackson’s Genius

It should always be counted a massive tragedy that Michael J Fox was robbed of the opportunity to make more films by his health, because he made some of the best family films of his generation, in the Back to the Future Trilogy, as well as other classics like Teen Wolf, The Secret of My Suce$s and Doc Hollywood. Okay, so not everything he touched was gold, but the actor who rescued Marty McFly from the evils of being ginger and unfunny (from Eric Stoltz of course) has such an easy charisma that even now when he appears in cameos and brief guest runs on TV (where his career trajectory has found comfort since 1996 and Spin City) it’s hard not to love him.

And just before he stopped making movies (aside from voice work for Stuart Little and Atlantis) the same year that Spin City arrived on the small screen,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »
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