It's Alive III: Island of the Alive (1987) Poster

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6/10
Unusually comical
lost-in-limbo20 January 2005
A father fights for the right for his mutant child to live, the court grants that and his child plus another 4 are sent to an island to live.

It was Warners Brothers idea for a third It's Alive film, which would be shot back to back with Return to Salem's Lot. It was meant to be release straight to video with RTSL, but it got a limited theatrical release.

This film had a little bit more money than that of the 2 previous films, but this time around the film is an over the top black comedy compared to the bleak and serious tone of the first two films, which had subtle humour.

This film was far less effective in the horror and atmospheric department, but not the laughs and it's been more action packed than the previous films. Though it is a stupid and lightweight film, it was still quite fresh (with a different take on the Alive films) and enjoyable to watch… that's if you're in the right frame of mood.

Cohan has a knack of casting the right people, with reasonable performances or you can call them hammy from Karen Black playing the mother to one of the babies and James Dixon (only one in all 3) as Detective Perkins and the standout performance and scene stealer would have to be Michael Moriarty as the father. He brings a strong central character that has a weird sense of humour and goes suddenly bananas with his lunatic behaviour when the film goes along.

Not only is the casting good, but also the script is full of wit and satirical comments (like the other 2 films) on American and Cuban relations, people's emotions, Aids and the media. The pace of the film is perfect and Daniel Pearl (The Texas chainsaw massacre) brings another element with his cinematography and lighting. The score is alright and the same for the atmosphere. The effects are pretty lame, with stop motion, puppets and people in rubber costumes. Too much of the creatures are shown, making it laughable (especially the grown-up versions of the babies), but that's what makes this fun viewing.

The film seems to lose itself and becomes incredibly stupid when the grown up mutant's decide to leave the island and head back to the mainland. Some of those scenes and its humour is totally cringe-worthy, but for what its worth… It's nothing but over the top cheese, it's not great but otherwise quite amusing.

3/5
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6/10
Michael Moriarty unleashed!
udar5527 November 2007
Larry Cohen returns after nearly a decade to finish off his mutant baby trilogy with mixed results. Stephen Jarvis (Michael Moriarty) battles in court for the rights of the mutant baby he had with his wife Ellen (Karen Black). The sympathetic judge orders all of the babies to be placed on an island. 5 years later, a scientific team gets together to visit the island and check the progress. Naturally, Jarvis is brought along because of his ability to communicate with the mutants.

Cohen certainly has tons of ideas with this one. This is a court room drama, KING KONG adventure, and urban chase thriller all in one. Heck, he even throws in an out of nowhere tangent where Jarvis ends up in Cuba. I would say maybe 50% of the ideas work, with the island stuff (shot in beautiful Hawaii) being the highlight. Cohen is also betrayed by the FX for the grown mutants, which look like the babies on steroids. Moriarty also gives quite a performance as the sarcastic Jarvis. There is a great cast alongside Moriarty and Black including Gerrit Graham, Laurene Landon, and director Neal Israel. Also, Cohen regular James Dixon returns in his biggest role to date as Lt. Perkins, the only character to appear in all three films (outside of the killer kids).
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6/10
Not a Popular One, But My Favorite of the Three
gavin69421 May 2007
Stephen Jarvis is the father of the monster (where "the monster" is another bloodthirsty infant). He gets involved with a court case that ends up getting the infants sent to an isolated island. But once the judge who ordered the infants away dies, different parties want them back in the spotlight.

Many people, including my horror reviewing colleague Don Normann, really dislike this film. It is considered the weakest of the three, the least popular and I would suspect that most consider it the cheesiest. I really liked it -- this one, more than the other two, seemed to really hit on a variety of social commentaries. Writer and director Larry Cohen's strength is his social commentary. Actually, that's almost his only strength -- he has no budget, is poorly organized in his shooting schedules and writes much of his scripts on the fly (which is quite obvious).

Two of horror's icons appear here: Michael Moriarty (as Stephen Jarvis) and Karen Black (as Ellen Jarvis). Black is probably now best known to modern audiences from Rob Zombie's "House of 1000 Corpses". Moriarty, on the other hand, is a Cohen staple -- appearing in "Q" and "Pick Me Up", for example. And this happens to be one of Moriarty's better roles (he has a very unique way of delivering dialog which works here but is dreadfully awful in "Pick Me Up"). I found him to be a good lead, especially in the improvised segments (such as the singing scene).

There is a good commentary on disease (does an infected child mean an infected parent) and a really good jab at Cuban-American relations. I think Cuba's military obsession is played up a bit, but the part about them being human was a good one (and still relevant twenty years later). And the pharmaceutical company trying to destroy the infants so their drugs couldn't be blamed... very nice (and reminiscent of the Thalidomide scandal).

Lastly, once you've watched it, watch it again with audio commentary (if you get the chance). Cohen's explanations really add a new dimension to this picture, pointing out where Bob Kane's wife comes in (Kane invented Batman), how many of the parts are just Cohen's friends and how a rubber chicken ended up on a deserted island. His justification for a variety of aspects of this film really help you understand what he was trying to achieve and make you realize just how close he came to achieving it.

If you've seen the first two, you need to see this third one. Not only does it wrap up the story in a nice, neat little package, but I think it's grossly under-appreciated. Judge it for what it is -- a low-budget B-movie. With that in mind, I think you'll be hard-pressed to find another film of its kind.
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7/10
Great sequel...excellent black comedy!
Coventry6 June 2005
Warning: Spoilers
I can't possibly figure out why the movie is rated so low here on IMDb... It's a very entertaining movie and an excellent closure to Larry Cohen's wild 'monstrous infants' trilogy. It already starts out terrific with a brilliant casting job: Michael Moriarty ("The Stuff") and Karen Black ("Burnt Offerings") together as parents?? No wonder that results in murderous offspring! This quirky B-movie implements a great tempo right from the beginning, with the cliché delivery of a killer-baby in a cab, and becomes even better when the entire freakshow is replaced to a courtroom. In this particularly fantastic opening, Stephen Jarvis (Moriarty), father of a mutant-baby, defends the rights of these ugly creatures and wants to prevent that more unfortunate babies are destroyed immediately after birth. After a powerfully scripted emotional speech, he wins the case and the babies are quarantined on a secret island location, down South of Florida. Five years later, Stephen Jarvis is forced against his will to join a scientific expedition towards to island to see how the babies have developed. The expedition crew will soon find out that the former babies still have ferocious tendencies but Jarvis equally discovers that they gained telekinetic powers and that they formed a community on their own...

Larry Cohen's still growing sense of black, offbeat humor is terrifically illustrated through some of the deranged plot-twists and – especially – through Moriarty's eccentric character. His sarcastic one-liners about his unsuccessful acting career or his unwanted popularity as the "father of the monster" makes this "Island of the Alive" one of Cohen's wittiest achievements to date. Also, this final chapter obviously disposed of a much larger budget as the previous installments which allows Cohen's to zoom in more on the malevolent babies and the mess they make when slaughtering. Keep your eyes open for all the ingenious little ideas Cohen adds during the trip to, and return from the island! There are too many to list, such as a side-trip to Fidel Castro's Cuba, a demented singing choir (which looks like it's spoofing "Jaws") or Jarvis' self-indulgent harassing-efforts towards a female scientist. Naturally, this movie has its flaws I can't overlook.. Maybe the finished product is a little long and some sequences should have stayed in the cutting room. Like for example a totally unrelated hunting-trip of greedy thrill-seekers to the island early in the film or a study of Karen Black's troubled love-life after giving birth to a monster. The climax is great, rewarding and makes Cohen's "It's Alive" circle complete. If you appreciate imaginative plotting and absurd horror tales, I recommend the entire It's Alive-cycle as well as every other production Larry Cohen was ever involved in.
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4/10
Not really all that bad
chinaskee19 March 2001
Personally,I didn't see a single boom shot in the whole extravaganza.There were some shots that were incredibly out of focus,but it turned out they were deliberate choices by the filmmakers.Parts of this film are actually wickedly funny,as all horror films should be.I couldn't help thinking though while watching this film that it might have actually been quite terrifying if the babies just looked like real babies!
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8/10
so bad it's good
leawenthome17 August 2006
I am a big fan of Larry Cohen movies. So absurdly and poorly written and executed that they are hilarious. This one contains some really funny scenes. Trivia- in the shoe store Mr. Moriarty says "plunk your magic twanger froggy." This stuck in my head a very bizarre moment (actually I re-winded and puzzled over it several times) and I later found out that it is a quote from "the frogger song" released on a "pacman fever" album in the 1980s. Both before and after I found out what the reference was to I wondered what drugs the writers were on. I bought the DVD. You don't have to see the other It's Alive movies to enjoy this one. You just have to like off the wall B-movies.
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5/10
Third time the charm
bkoganbing6 June 2013
Third time was the charm of sorts for Larry Cohen. The first It's Alive film was interesting, the second I thought stupid. But in Island Of The Alive Cohen found the tone he should have used for the two preceding films and the right actor to set the tone.

Michael Moriarty and Karen Black play a parents of the latest mutant baby and Moriarty goes to court on a preventive strike to win his kid's life. He does, but it and some other mutants are placed on a Caribbean island in exile to be studied to find a solution to a growing problem.

Moriarty with his swaggering style dominates this film. The writers took special care of him with the script and he delivers their lines at his sarcastic best. The film takes a couple of real good jabs at contemporary America of the Reagan era.

Sad the film's antecedents retard its ratings. But this is clearly the best of the series. If another is done, hopefully it will be in the same vein.
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4/10
Mutant babies are collected and contained.
michaelRokeefe7 December 2010
Warning: Spoilers
Whether for good or bad, Larry Cohen's mutant baby sage continues. Razor-sharp toothed killer infants are shipped to a remote deserted island. Of course, this is to completely keep the killing tykes from civilization. The government is closer to eliminating them when a father (Michael Moriarty) of one of the babies gathers a group to protest in mass the wholesale demise of the mutants. Cohen's trilogy seems to have gone unappreciated. Yes, some of the scenes are disturbing...but overall special effects could have been improved. This doesn't mean this flick can't satisfy the fans of cheesy gore. Also in the cast: Laurene Landon, James Dixon, Gerrit Graham and Karen Black.
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4/10
Not as good as the first two.
poolandrews26 September 2010
Warning: Spoilers
It's Alive III: Island of the Alive starts in court as state prosecutor argues that the mutant babies that are being born across the US should be killed at birth & are not human, mutant baby father Stephen Jarvis (Michhael Moriarty) manages to convince the court that the babies have feelings & should be allowed to live. Judge Milton Watson (Macdonald Carey) rules in favour of Jarvis & the babies right to live but orders them all to be placed on an isolated island away from humanity so they cannot hurt anyone & that the location be kept secret. Five years later & Jarvis is contacted by cop Lt. Perkins (James Dixon) who has agreed to go to the island with a team of Government funded scientists to study the babies & how they have adapted, as a father of one of the mutant babies they want Jarvis to accompany them which he also agrees to. Once at the island the team discover that the babies have grown up remarkably quickly, have telepathic powers & have started breeding amongst themselves...

Executive produced, written & directed by Larry Cohen this was the third entry in his It's Alive trilogy, the first It's Alive (1974) is generally considered to be a strong film while it's sequel It Lives Again (1978) expanded upon the original's themes without being quite as good which leaves It's Alive III: Island of the Alive as probably the weakest of the three films in my opinion & I have now seen all three in the space of three days. The script here seems rushed, the film jumps from one random subplot to another, from the court case to Jarvis being rejected by a woman because he's the mutant babies father to a hunting expedition on the island to the scientific research team to a bizarre scene in Cuba to an ending where the mutant baby wants to find it's mother the film as a whole never quite gels together with the various strands of the plot dangling around without nothing to tie them together. It's Alive III: Island of the Alive just seems like a lazy film, it just seems like Cohen had various ideas but didn't quite know how to knit them together so he would just put one idea into the script, get bored with it & have another idea & go with that one instead forgetting about the previous one. At an hour & a half it does drag at times & the biting social commentary & neat metaphors from the previous It's Alive films are notably absent here in what is a much more routine & predictable script.

Made back to back with A Return to Salem's Lot (1987) with many of the same cast & crew that might also explained the rushed nature of the film, even the amusing visuals of the first two films are missing here in what is a fairly bland looking film throughout. The gore is very restrained despite being the only one rated 'R', there's some profanity, one mild sex scene, some slashed faces, some blood splatter & the only real stand out gore moment is a guy seen staggering around with his arm ripped off. Once again the babies are barely seen, this time around there's stop-motion animation & we see them grown up but like when they are babies it's just quick flashes of what they look like.

The island scenes were apparently filmed in Hawaii but the editing is still choppy & it does look a little cheap at times. The acting varies, Michael Moriarty is always watchable but he puts in a crazy performance here, from mumbling to himself to singing songs while on the open sea to various sarcastic one-liners to sexual harassment of female scientists.

It's Alive III: Island of the Alive is the weakest of the three It's Alive films, that's all there is to it really. Watchable in an oddball sort of way but nothing special overall.
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5/10
The most entertaining of the It's Alive films, but also the stupidest.
TOMNEL14 January 2007
Starring: Michael Moriarty and Karen Black.

A TV actor is plagued with a mutant baby that he wants to live. The mutant babies are sent to an uninhibited island. 5 years later the washed up actor is a shoe salesman because no one will hire him, and he decides to find his baby, and make a trip to the island. Once on the island, he learns that the babies have grown up, and the baby wants to meet it's mother (a waitress played by Karen Black). Before the trip to the island this film is quite entertaining, and once on the island it becomes extremely stupid. I was entertained enough through the movie, but it gets stupider than any of the other films. It seems as though the gore and language were amped up a level. Overall it was stupid, but it's entertainment value made it on the same level as the other 2 films.

My rating: ** out of ****. 94 mins. R for Language, Violence, and some Sex.
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Cohen to the extreme, but the grown babies disappoint
horrorbargainbin3 September 2002
It's full of outrageous speeches and monologues ripe with social commentary and dark humor. The violent scenarios are so outrageous as to be funny, intentionally or otherwise. I can't always tell wether I laughing at or with Cohen's material. From Maniac Cop to The Stuff Cohen's movies question America's laws, beliefs, and habits in not so subtle ways. I do think that horror and sci-fi films have an important use as a way of getting audiences to question the way society conducts itself. At the same time I don't know if Cohen is making fun of his own film with some of the more sentimental dialogue (Cubans, then enemies of the U.S. wishing Jarvis the best) and the over the top scenes (a dying baby monster trying to Baptise itself).

How about the babies? Well they have been banished too a Jurassic Park type island where they crawl about in well done stop-animation and dispatch a bunch of hunters in gorey fashion. Unfortunately, the latter half of the film takes place after the babies have matured and the impressive little demons are replaced by silly rubber suits. For some reason they strip their victims of clothes and then wear the tattered rags. Ultimately the conclusion is less spectacular than expected and we don't get to see many close-ups of the bigger monsters for obvious reasons.
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4/10
Leave my baby alone
lastliberal24 August 2008
The most interesting thing about this film was seeing Golden Globe and three-time Emmy winner Michael Moriarty rant and rave about the fact that they wouldn't leave his child alone. I just can't look at Moriarity without seeing Ben Stone from "Law and Order." Seeing him on the other side arguing before Macdonald Carey (also a two-time Daytime Emmy winner for "Days of Our Lives") to save that butt-ugly child of his was hilarious.

But, it gets even funnier as he tries to save his child and, ultimately, his grandchild. He should be Parent of the Year for loving those creatures. Karen Black is his ex, the mother of the monster, and, well, you just have to see how that ends.

Making a comedy out of these things is genius.
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9/10
a biting satire of america
sonatine4223 February 2000
Like Sam Fuller, Larry Cohen is an extremely underrated filmmaker who managed to make 'b-movies'which say alot more then 'a-movies'. Its Alive 3 is perhaps his most subversive and humorous film. While the surface plot involves an island of mutated babies, the film also holds commentary on abortion, the media (and how it manipulates and destroys lives) and even Cuba. All it takes to pick up on this masterpiece is an open mind...
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May God have mercy on their souls
Baz-1328 May 1999
Never before has such an atrocity been sinned upon celluloid. The acting, writing, directing and special effects are so terrifyingly laughable that I hovered on the brink on insanity as I watched the "story" unfold. The microphone bobs into shot so many times it's almost a regular character, and it has more screen presence and charisma than the rest of the cast put together. Everyone responsible in any part for this film should never be allowed to work in the motion picture industry again.

Probably the best film ever made about bad stop motion mutant babies living on an island.
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4/10
Very Enjoyable Unlike Where I Live
Theo Robertson24 June 2003
Warning: Spoilers
Someone once asked me " What`s the inhabitants of the isle of mute called - Mutants ? " " No Corporal " I replied " It`s the isle of Bute and they`re called Brandanes " But come to think of it when I walk down the streets of Rothesay on the Isle of Bute and see the inbred lumpen underclass drinking on top of empty heads I do think Corporal Williams may have been right . It is the Isle of Mute and the inhabitants are Mutants

***** SLIGHT SPOILERS *****

Anyway you get the drift , I live on an island and I come across mutants all the time so I was going to relate to a film dealing with mutant babies being confined and I wasn`t disappointed by what I saw . ISLAND OF THE ALIVE is a very entertaining bad taste horror comedy , maybe not a classic like Peter Jackson`s BAD TASTE but still fairly good as the film opens with a woman giving birth in a New York taxi cab and a cop trying to shoot the new born baby , while the next scene features the knowingly stupid line " It took four bullets before it died - That`s some baby " , and of course there`s scenes of the mutant killer babies ( Done by stop frame animation , none of this CGI rubbish )going on killing sprees , and I haven`t even mentioned Michael Moriarty doing a great Al Bundy impression .

I`ve no idea why people are slagging this movie off , it`s supposed to be silly . My only criticism about ISLAND OF THE ALIVE is it slows down in the final third and the expected HUMANOIDS OF THE DEEP ending with the mutant infants emerging from the sea attacking everyone in the city doesn`t appear which made the ending a complete anti-climax .

And if Larry Cohen is thinking of doing a sequel to ISLAND OF THE ALIVE showing what happened to the mutant youngsters after they`ve grown up he should come to the Isle Of Bute . He won`t need a script , only a camcorder
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5/10
Cohen abuses his own premise with silliness
fertilecelluloid5 December 2005
An island of mutant babies! Sounds great, right? Unfortunately, in Larry Cohen's hands, it's more amusing than great, although the island setting is quite evocative. The real pity once again is Cohen's direction. Is the guy making a black comedy or a serious horror pic? I don't think he's sure. He's definitely taking every opportunity to lather in his trademark social commentary, and I don't have a problem with that, but he abuses his own premise here with sheer silliness.

The babies look like Garbage Pail Kids crossed with Party Beach monsters. They're big and they're greasy and they wear hand-me-down rags that don't fit. They still kill and they're still sympathetic tragics, but they've lost their mystery, their awe.

It's a shame the great artwork didn't reflect the movie.
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5/10
PopCultureThoughts.Com
popculturethoughts3 January 2019
The final entry in the Larry Cohen trilogy is a step above its disappointing predecessor. The story itself is relatively inventive especially for a second sequel, and it's nice that the filmmakers have at least taken some steps to follow the first movie's narrative to a natural conclusion. Relocating the goings on to a tropical island gives Cohen many opportunities for gorgeous photography and he doesn't miss a chance to highlight his movie's breathtaking visual look. Cohen also benefits from improved special effects, which look crude to modern eyes but at least allowed the director to expand the internal mythology of his series.
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7/10
A baby ate my dingo.
Hey_Sweden30 May 2018
After requests from Warner Bros. to do another sequel to his landmark thriller "It's Alive", Larry Cohen responded with this tale set several years after the events of the first two movies.

Only five of the murderous mutant babies remain, and after Stephen Jarvis (frequent Cohen star Michael Moriarty), a failed actor and father to one of them, makes a case for the kids to be spared, they are taken to a deserted tropical isle. There they will be left to their own devices, and won't be a danger to "normal" humans.

Four years later, the judge (Macdonald Carey, 'Days of Our Lives') who presided over the trial passes away. Then an expedition is launched to the isle to make note of whatever progress the monster children have made. Stephen is asked to tag along.

Kudos to Cohen for not keeping this *completely* predictable (not that much time is actually spent on the island), and for using this opportunity to make some pointed commentary on things like abortion, the AIDS epidemic, and the way that people will heartlessly exploit human interest stories for the sake of a few bucks. Cohens' script is frequently intriguing, and effective in a darkly comic way. (Gone is the very serious tone of the first two movies.) It allows Moriarty to once again be goofy and eccentric, albeit not quite to the extent that the actor giddily hammed it up in "Q". Also, "Island of the Alive" possesses one thing that some genre movies just don't have: an ability to make an emotional connection to the characters.

The performances are better than you might ordinarily see in such fare. Co-starring are Karen Black ('Trilogy of Terror') as Stephens' ex-wife, James Dixon (another Cohen repertory player again reprising his role of Lt. Perkins), Gerrit Graham ("Used Cars") as a grandstanding attorney, Patch Mackenzie ("Graduation Day") as his opposing counsel, the incredibly sexy Laurene Landon ("Maniac Cop") as a prostitute, film director Neal Isreal ("Bachelor Party") and Art Lund ("Black Caesar") as scientists, and William Watson ("The Mack") as the head of a pharmaceutical company.

The haunting musical theme by Bernard Herrmann ("Psycho") is once again utilized, with good new music by Laurie Johnson ("Captain Kronos - Vampire Hunter"). Daniel Pearl ("The Texas Chain Saw Massacre") handles cinematography duties, and it's a real change of pace to see Cohen tackling a production that actually looks like it had a decent budget. Some viewers may be disappointed with the effects, but Cohen never holds on these shots for too, too long, and he does serve up some pretty entertaining gore.

Overall, a nice conclusion to this initial trilogy, and followed in 2008 by a remake of the original movie.

Seven out of 10.
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6/10
Somewhat enjoyable if still flawed effort
Wanting to rid themselves of the babies, the decision to import the mutants to an uninhabited island leads to a later expedition to study the creatures which shows that they're attempting to get back to the mainland to continue their line and must prevent them from doing so.

This was the best of the series but is still somewhat of an issue. Among the more enjoyable elements found here is the opening manner of what to do with the creatures in society which is a unique take. The exploits of the courtroom trial, which has some nice work in the ability to showcase how friendly they can be and the overall outcome of the verdict, start this off on a nice note while setting up what's going to occur with the later half. The concept of the tropical island where they're being stored away from humanity gives this a solid and nicely appealing storyline involving the continuation of the themes and ideas from the previous films coming together into the fine series of attacks shown in the final half. From the scenes of the expedition members getting wiped out to the carnage shown onboard the boat with the dead bodies and the search for the creatures back on the mainline, these here are what make this one somewhat fun. Along with the nice gore in the few kills we do get to see, these here are enough to hold this one up over its many flaws. Like the past films in the series, this one is mostly hurt by the fact that so much of this one is just not that interesting to sit through. The creatures are given the motive of wanting to return to civilization in order to seek out the mother of their conception which should be quite a fun concept to go through but instead, there's just no sympathy given for this kind of storyline here. It's just quite impossible to get into why this should matter with how this plays out and the film just never makes it over into that realm here due to the inherent stupidity of everyone in the film. The idea of a secret mission to the island without any kind of backup with a rinky-dink sort of operation and background just seems moronic, the way it carries out is quite appropriate and the whole affair is just so hum-drum that it doesn't really make any impact. As well, there's also the lame special effects here with the shoddy-looking creature suits substituting for the few shots they get on-screen as they are mostly just shown flashes of arms, claws or fangs or just done in their point-of-view so it leaves quite a distasteful feeling. Overall, these here are what hold this one down.

Rated R: Graphic Violence, Graphic Language and an attempted Rape.
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6/10
Dark Humor Drenched in Blood
Uwontlikemyopinion11 May 2018
Stephen Jarvis (Michael Moriarty) argues in a courtroom for the life of his mutant son. The judge mandates for the isolation of the mutant babies on an abandoned island. Five years pass, Stephen accepts the opportunity to see his child again on the island. I guess no love is greater than that of a father for his son.

Michael Moriarty's eccentric performance and Larry Cohen's direction enhance a clumsy and uninvolving script. The dark humor and social commentary on AIDS, media exploitation, abortion, and Cuba-US relations elevates the ensuing B-movie schlock and manages to make the film slightly transgressive.

Be warned, this movie is nothing more than cheesy dialogue and bad special effects. The first fifteen minutes drag and only set up the mayhem. After that, I thought the film got progressively better, but depends on the viewer's temper with Moriarty's hammy performance. The narrative structure becomes clumsy and almost meaningless (I stopped paying attention and went along for the ride). While "It's Alive III: Island of the Alive" isn't anything to praise, the film knows how to have fun.
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A Masterpiece of Its Genre
inanytime25 October 2013
If you like the films of Ed Wood (Plan 9 from Outer Space) and Larry Blamire (The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra), you're going to love this one. I haven't seen any other films of this series and had no expectations when I started to watch it, but I thoroughly enjoyed film for its humour and the depiction of the story. This film has got on your face dead pan humour, with good acting by the entire cast, especially Michael Moriarty who is perfect in his portrayal of Jarvis. Good locations and camera work even though it's supposed to be low budget. It's got some of the best one liners you'll ever come across in a horror movie.
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Offbeat entry in the series
Wizard-826 May 2013
Of all the movies in the "It's Alive" series, this entry, despite some obvious problems, is possibly the best of all three. Although the movie was primarily made for the video market (though Warner Brothers gave it a small theatrical release first), the production values beat those of the first two films by a wide margin, from an expensive look to complex camera movements. The script also has some interest, taking comic as well as serious looks at topics like fame and the legal system. And there is a really offbeat performance by Michael Moriarty that commands your attention in every scene he's in. But as I said, there are some problems. At times the movie appears to be a cut down edit from a longer version - some scenes appear to be missing, and Karen Black only appears in two very brief scenes in the first hour of the movie. However, the opposite problem happens in the last third of the movie, being too much extended and slow. Still, the movie is kooky enough to be interesting, so if you liked the first two movies, you'll likely enjoy this one.
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"What's wrong with my baby?!?!"
Backlash0073 July 2005
Warning: Spoilers
~Spoiler~

"It's one of them!" A pretty fine opening scene is the best part of this movie. After that, it goes downhill pretty quick. The killer babies are back, and this time they are sent to an abandoned island so they can no longer be a threat to humanity, and vice versa. It sounds like a great idea, but too much of the movie does not take place on said island. I envisioned an isolated island movie where some activists or other parties go searching for the babies, get stranded on the island, and mayhem ensues. Sadly, that is not the case. The babies aren't looking as good as they used to either. The first film succeeds by keeping the baby in the shadows, never quite revealing it. This film fails to generate any suspense because the creatures don't hold up so well fully exposed at great length. Larry Cohen even admitted this. The cast includes Cohen's go-to-guy, Michael Moriarty, and the always hammy Karen Black. So the acting is about what you expect. Moriarty has playing odd characters down to a science. They are still using the Bernard Herrmann score so that's one good thing they've got going for them.
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Decent Fun
Michael_Elliott3 December 2008
It's Alive 3 (1987)

** (out of 4)

A court orders that all mutant babies must be sent to a deserted island. Four years later a group goes there to see how the babies have grown up. I saw bits and pieces of this years ago but this was my first time going through the whole thing and man what a bitter disappointment. Larry Cohen takes this film a lot less serious and goes over the top with things but he didn't go far enough. The thought of seeing the babies grown up was a great idea but it takes an hour for us to reach the island. When the humor does come it isn't enough so most of the time the film is just a bore.
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the its alive babies are all grown up!
dav07dan028 August 2005
Director/Script: Larry Cohen, Cast: Michael Moriarty, Karen Black, James Dixon

This is, of course, the last film in the 'Its Alive' trilogy by Larry Cohen. It also features James Dixon, the only person to appear in all three films. In the original film, only one couple was known to have produced such a baby. By this third film,they have multiplied and several couples are producing these mutant demon babies. This film starts out in court with the father of one of the babies. He is pleading with some federal judge to spare these babies from destruction. The babies are ordered by the judge to be sent off to a remote island off the coast of Flordia where they will remain in exile. Nobody is to go to the island. Five years later the judge dies so the no visitors to the island policy changes. A team of scientists along with the father go to the island to 'see how the babies are doing' The babies are now five years old, fully grown and meaner than ever! Before long, the father is the only one left alive. The 'babies' are brought back to the mainland with disastrous results!

This film is a good ending to the series. Certainly not on par with the first but a good enough sequel with that same 'B' movie campiness of the two previous films. This probably had the highest production cost of the three films. Interestingely enough, the first two films where PG rated whereas this one received an R rating due to F words that where thrown in for good measure. Cinematography was done by Dan Pearl of Texas Chainsaw Massacre fame.
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