Little Shop of Horrors (1986) Poster

User Reviews

Review this title
183 Reviews
Sort by:
Filter by Rating:
10/10
My favourite film of all time
AudreyToo6 September 2015
I certainly don't understand the low rating on here for this film - if you've never seen it before don't let that put you off watching it.

LSOH was my 'family movie' as a kid, introduced to us by our dentist uncle. Everything about it is just perfect it - is funny, self-aware and contains too many brilliant scenes to count. The songs are consistently great and the casting is spot on. I especially love all the amazing cameos: Bill Murray, John Candy etc.

Whenever I'm ill or feeling down, all I need to do to feel better is just watch this film. I never trust anyone says they don't like this film!
28 out of 35 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
8/10
A Wacky and "Out There" Musical that's a lot of Fun...
ijonesiii22 December 2005
The 1986 film version of the Broadway musical LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS is an entertaining movie based on the black comedy from the 1960's about a nerdy milquetoast who raises a man-eating plant that gets totally out of control. Rick Moranis is perfection as Seymour, the nebbish who is at a loss at what to do when his own Frankenstein grows too big for him to control and Ellen Greene (reprising her role in the original musical) is delightful as Audrey, the object of Seymour's affections. Moranis and Greene make one of the most engaging screen teams I've seen in a while. Vincent Gardenia plays the greedy flower shop owner, Mr. Mushnik and Bill Murray is hysterically funny in one scene as Arthur Denton, a man who seems to enjoy going to the dentist a little too much. Tischina Arnold, Tisha Campbell, and Michelle Weeks are awesome as the Greek Chorus known as "The Urchins" and Steve Martin practically steals the movie as "Orin Scrivello, DDS". His song "Be a Dentist" is hysterically funny. The voice of the plant, Audrey II, is provided by Levar Stubbs of The Four Tops and he is superb. A fun musical comedy that the whole family can enjoy.
45 out of 70 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An off-beat delight
Bill-30831 January 1999
No, not the black & white Roger Corman jewel featuring Jack Nicholson, though I suppose I'd watch that one again too. I'm talking about the 1986 color musical with Rick Moranis and Audrey II by way of Frank Oz. Like I tell my friends about "Babe," I love a film with a Greek chorus. In this one, the chorus consists of three Motownish women singers, Crystal, Chiffon and Ronette. I'll watch this film again, just to hear them sing one line: "TO – TAL – E – CLIPSE – OF – THE – SUN!" This is an all-singing, all-dancing science fiction black comedy that features human misery, a sadistic dentist, a masochistic patient, casual murder, girlfriend abuse, and a blood-sucking alien house plant monster. It's hilarious from beginning to end. And the music is outstanding.
52 out of 86 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
9/10
Loving homage to B movie ideals
djfoster7 January 1999
One of the most unappreciated films of the eighties, the songs, performances, and especially the affectionate screenplay all harken back to the cheap old days of Roger Corman and his B movie compatriots. From Steve Martin's sadistic Elvis-inspired dentist to the early girl-group rock score, "Little Shop" moves with an appropriately cheesy style that lets you in on the joke, yet never insults you for loving those poverty row movies.
38 out of 68 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Spectacular film, a piece of real genius
Noting the several comments from people who hated or just didn't "get" this film, I am more convinced than ever that democracy is a rather lame idea since many people are simply too stupid or vapid to deserve a vote. But I digress....

I laughed my ass off when I first heard that "Little Shop" was being remade as a musical, and gleefully predicted that it would be an even bigger turd than the musical remake of "Lost Horizon" -- truly one of the most ghastly things that ever soiled a piece of film. I rented the presumed-abominable "Little Shop" musical, invited a few friends over, and we flat fell in love with this movie. None of us are even big fans of musicals; I liked "Carousel" and "Oklahoma," but that's pretty much my complete list of musicals that will bear re-watching. And now this one!

Boy, did I ever call this one wrong, and I'm damned glad I did. I've seen it ten or fifteen times, and caught pieces of it another few dozen times while flipping channels. I never tire of it. It's that good.

The music is fabulous (as many others have commented), and every piece of casting is perfect. Rick Moranis, who I never thought of as anything other than a competent character actor, does a grand job; he's actually VERY competent and perfect for this role. Surprisingly, he does an amazingly good job of singing (if it was lip-synched, the voice-match was simply perfect). His stock shot up a lot of points with me for this work. His duet work with Ellen Greene (particularly on the operatic "Suddenly Seymour") was superb, though I'll bet he was sorely intimidated to be belting out a duet with someone with the power and range of the incredible Ellen Greene. But he rips right in, carries it off beautifully, and magic happens. There are a lot of tremendous voices in "Little Shop," but "Suddenly Seymour" never fails to bring out the goose bumps for me. How that tiny little woman can shake the walls like that is a great mystery -- my God, what a pair of lungs!

Everyone else has sung the praises of Levi Stubbs and Steve Martin, and a raft of other cameo roles, so I'll just say, "Ditto."

As I said, I was a big fan of the very dark "original" version, and I never saw the stage play. I've read enough about the "original" ending of this musical (which I won't spoil) to believe that I'd have liked the "original" ending at least as much as the basically "happy" ending we were left with. I'd love to see a DVD with both versions, just to compare.

I was perfectly prepared to hate this film, and particularly since I have nothing but disgust for Geffen, personally. However, this has become one of my favorite films of all time -- certainly on my "Top 30" or thereabouts, maybe even "Top 20."
21 out of 38 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
Great musical!
grahamsj312 February 2004
It IS a musical! This film has great music and dance tunes throughout! Rick Moranis is spot-on as the nerd who falls for the beautiful woman (who, of course, basically dismisses him). Along the way, he acquires a flesh-eating plant that loves people - the wrong way. The plant (Audrey 2 after Audrey, the love interest) also sings wonderfully and it makes for a great time! This one's a classic for sure!
24 out of 48 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
A cute and fun little musical
Smells_Like_Cheese15 May 2004
I have known this film since I could crawl. And it was very cool when I was in it at my high school. Ah, memories. *sniff*, oh sorry! The musical is a lot of fun to watch. It is a little cheesy on some levels. But you'll enjoy it somewhat.

Rick Moranis is a wonderful actor. I really enjoyed him as Seymor. The rest of the cast delivers a great musical. Steve Martin is one of the best characters in "Litle Shop". And as well as the extremely talented John Candy.*hint* :D

I would recommend this for a fun time. But I am still curious about the original ending.

7/10
23 out of 48 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Little Shop of Horrors
Coxer9920 July 1999
Delightful film version of the Off Broadway triumph based on the Roger Corman black comedy, carried off beautifully here by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken's memorable tunes.
27 out of 58 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
9/10
Not as great as the original Corman version, but original in its own way
Casey-5219 April 2000
I am usually not a big fan of musicals turned into film (except in the case of films like "Fame" or Busby Berkeley films), but "Little Shop of Horrors" surprised me. I rushed right out and bought the soundtrack! The music is excellent, very tongue-in-cheek, great lyrics, music reminiscent of the 50s (the female chorus members are named after girl groups: Crystal, Ronette, Chiffon), and just fun to listen to.

The ensemble cast is one of the best in recent history. Everybody in the film acts in a role tailor-made for them! Rick Moranis as a geek, Ellen Greene as a bubbly blonde, Steve Martin as a cool biker dentist, Bill Murray as a giggling masochist, Vincent Gardenia as a slob flower shop owner, etc.

Fans of the original Corman film will be deeply disappointed. Gone is all and any dark humor from that film. I deeply miss the scene where Seymour considers getting a hooker to feed to Audrey II (Seymour: "You're too bony?" Hooker: "Bony? [exposes torso] What do you think this is? Chopped liver?")! But all that is missing is replaced by fun musical numbers, sleazy sets, and a much better Audrey II plant. The musical version ended with Audrey being eaten and Seymour sacrificing himself to the plant, but the movie's ending is made to be happier...sort of...

Recommended for everyone, even those who aren't fans of musicals!
21 out of 44 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
9/10
Top class entertainment in a perfect campy environment.
Boba_Fett113815 October 2004
"Little Shop of Horrors" really is a movie that is fun to watch over and over again.

I'm not a big musical fan but I can appreciate a classic like "Grease", "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" and a good Disney movie. "Little Shop of Horrors" is also on my list of classic musicals.

It was a good move by director Frank Oz to make the sets campy and musical like. It gives the movie an excellent feeling and atmosphere. Also the way of acting is very campy and over the top which works excellent for the movie.

The movie is filled with some nice cameo's by famous actors. My favorite cameos are by John Candy and Bill Murray both as excellent and fun characters that are good for some serious laughs. The other most fun character is played by Steve Martin in one of his best and most fun roles I've ever seen him in.

I can't say that I'm a big fan of all of the songs but still there are some good songs in the movie which makes it a successful and pleasant musical to watch and listen to.

9/10

http://bobafett1138.blogspot.com/
17 out of 36 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Bigger than Hula-Hoops!
vip_ebriega16 January 2009
My Take: Definitely one of my favorite musicals of all time.

The last few months of the year 2008 have not been good to me, but it has its ups and downs. The limelights? A reunion with an old favorite: None other than the 80's hit musical LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. I remember watching LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS as a kid, and I remembered loving it. I've been hunting to see this movie for quite sometime. Thankfully, it caught me in surprise on TV one time, then I went out seeing it again... and again on DVD, still being fresh each time. It's the best movie of its kind, even if I don't know exactly what kind of movie it is.

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS combines two delightful concepts: A joyous, old-fashioned musical and a send-off of the campy, low-budget B-movies of the B&W era. In fact, which you all might know by now, this brilliant concept all started from one big joke, from Roger Corman no less. Corman produced the original LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS as a mere joke that he can make a film with a reused set from another movie and a limited shooting schedule of two days. The result was a film that was ignored in its initial release, but earned its cult following subsequent years later. One of this avid admirers is David Geffen, who has just come up with a brilliant idea: turn the film into a silly, bent Broadway musical. Strange, maybe if it wasn't so good. The musical was a surprise success, even loved by Mr. Corman himself. So it was inevitable for Geffen to take his brilliant idea one step further: turn it into a big-budget Hollywood production.

Originally attached to the project is Martin Scorcese and Steven Spielberg, doing the movie in a very modest budget. But the reigns eventually went to puppeteer Frank Oz (most remembered as the voice of Yoda), with the budget exceeding $30 million. Plus the film was also legendary for flushing out $2 million worth of special effects after the menacing original ending tested poorly (deemed too dark) on test audiences, with an improved Hollywood happy ending made to replace it. Still, despite the expenses and some of the criticism toward the film, LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS is still one of the best times I had in watching movies. The movie is a funhouse of endless entertainment packed with silly laughs, memorable musical numbers, tuneful songs, fine acting and outrageous special effects (even in this CG era, the Audrey II puppet created by Lyle Conway is still very convincing).

Rick Moranis stars as a down-on-his-luck slob Seymour Krelborn, who works in a bankrupt florist shop in the outcast district of Skid Row, where all the outcasts reside, including his bankrupt boss Mushnick (Vincent Gardenia) and battered beauty Audrey (Ellen Greene, reprising her off-off Broadway role). But when he finds a small, potted plant which he calls Audrey II, his life's about change. He becomes a great success, with the florist shop and boss right along with him. But there's a catch: Little Audrey II's hungry for blood, and he's growing... and growing... and growing. So how does Seymour feed a giant, singing man-eating vegetable? Nothing big, just chopping-up and killing people! LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS is quite like the "Springtime for Hitler" scene from Mel Brook's THE PRODUCERS. It's a little sick and dark on one hand, with a concept that's totally beyond its league, but in the end, it's fun, funny and peppered with inspired moments that never fails to make you smile in every frame. What are you waiting for? Feed yourself with the oddball delight of the irresistible LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS.

Rating: ***** out of 5.
7 out of 12 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Madcap musical mayhem
george.schmidt11 April 2003
LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1986) ***1/2 Rick Moranis, Ellen Greene, Vincent Gardenia, Steve Martin, Jim Belushi, John Candy, Christopher Guest. Entertaining musical comedy based on the off-Broadway smash inspired by Roger Corman's cult low-budget horror flick "The Little Shop of Horrors" never lets up on energy in this decidedly camp tale about nerd Seymour Krelborn (Moranis in geek mode) the apprentice florist at a skid row floral shop whose hybrid creation of a Venus flytrap grows in more ways than one when it develops a nasty craving for human blood. Very funny and brightly directed by Muppeteer Frank Oz with lots of eye candy and expert detail of 1960 with a creme de la creme cast of comic geniuses. Outstanding especially is Martin as the sadomasochistic dentist a la Elvis and his scene with pain on the brain patient Murray (pricelessly hysterical in the role made famous by a young Jack Nicholson). Great creature visuals of "Audrey II" with voice provided by Four Tops leadman Levi Stubbs. Greene does a memorable turn as the abused heroine Audrey whose best described as Marilyn Monroe and Carol Channing purreed into one; sad sexpot with a lot of spunk and heart. Memorable songs particularly the show stopper "Suddenly Seymour".
20 out of 44 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
One of the best films ever made!
franko19981 November 2001
"Little Shop of Horrors" is so amazingly special and unique, that viewing it almost transports you to another world. It's quite possibly the best film representation of a stage musical ever made--the sets are perfect, the casting is perfect, the music is perfect, and everything else about the film is perfect. Rick Moranis, Vincent Gardenia, and Steve Martin are all wonderful as Seymour Krelborn, Mushnik, and Orin Scrivello, DDS. However, my favorite performance in this film is that of Ellen Greene (who reprises her part from Broadway). The role of Audrey, Seymour's bubbly, sexy yet innocent co-worker with low self-esteem was made for her. I heard that the role was first offered to Barbara Striesand (who declined), and I am SO glad Ellen ended up getting it! Maybe the reason why some people, though very few, don't care for this movie is that there has never really been another film (that I'm aware of) even remotely like it. I just hope one day this film gets re-released into theaters!
6 out of 10 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Cult Classic.
MovieAddict20162 September 2003
Warning: Spoilers
Strange but humorous tale of a florist clerk (Rick Moranis) who comes across a rare plant which demands human blood. As it grows it wants more and more, and Moranis eventually kills an annoying - but funny - dentist (Steve Martin) to feed to the plant. Disgusting, dark, odd, strange, and delightfully perverted remake of the 1970s Jack Nicholson film. Highlight: Steve Martin's "Dentist!" song.

4.5/5 stars -

John Ulmer
13 out of 28 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
8 or 9/10 for the theatrical release, but 10/10 for Frank Oz's original version.
BA_Harrison27 December 2008
If your idea of a great musical is less 'Singing in the Rain', 'West Side Story' or 'South Pacific' and more 'Hairspray', 'Rocky Horror, and 'Phantom of the Paradise' then you simply must check out Frank Oz's Little Shop of Horrors.

Based on the off-Broadway show, which was itself based on the cult Roger Corman movie, this marvellously entertaining piece of sci-fi schlock horror is funny, romantic, a little scary (well, my kids thought so), and huge fun from start to finish.

Rick Moranis stars as Seymour Krelborn, a nerdish shop assistant in a skid-row florists. Seymour's pitiful life changes drastically, however, when he discovers an unusual plant and takes it back to his workplace: the strange specimen brings the lonely horticulturist fame and fortune, plus the chance of finally scoring with busty blonde co-worker Audrey (Ellen Greene). The only problem is that the plant needs constant feeding, and Miracle-Gro just won't do.... no, this sucker wants blood, and lots of it!

Moranis makes a likable leading man, and shows off a surprisingly good singing voice, whilst Ellen Greene impresses not only with her incredible vocals, but also with her amazing body, which often threatens to steal the show. These two leads are joined by a fine supporting cast, which includes top comedy performers of the day Steve Martin, Bill Murray, John Candy, Christopher Guest, and James Belushi.

The real star of the film, however, is 'Audrey II', the alien plant creature voiced by The Four Tops' Levi Stubb's; this 'mean green mother from outer space' is a miracle of special effects with its fluid movements and impeccable lip-synching making it one of the finest examples of animatronics I have ever seen in a film.

The theatrical release of Little Shop of Horrors—the one that is currently available on DVD and the one I first saw back in 1986—ends with Seymour destroying the monstrous pot-plant and living happily ever after with Audrey; it's a lot of fun and is easily worth a rating of at least 8/10. But if you think that is good, be sure to check out Frank Oz's original, downbeat, apocalyptic ending, which was rejected by test audiences; it's on You Tube and will leave you gob-smacked. Now that version is definitely worth full marks! Let's hope there's a Director's Cut available on DVD sometime real soon.
5 out of 10 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Superb!
hqatemc24 June 2007
Firstly I should state that, in general, I *loathe* musicals. Can't stand them. Although I love music. Secondly, this is my favourite film of all time. The acting, the songs, the plant... the whole thing is close to perfection. Funniest song, with the BEST lyrics ever - "Dentist!" Most moving song (guaranteed goose-bumps even after 20 viewings) -"Suddenly, Seymour". Ellen Green has a powerhouse voice and Rick Moranis' voice does just as much as it should to stay in-tune and in-character. Levi Stubbs is excellent as the voice of 'Audrey'. If my house were falling down, I'd grab my dogs, my L.S.O.H. DVD and then my husband, in that order!
5 out of 10 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
A satire of life
johnstonjames30 October 2009
A lot of people miss the point of this film. It is not perverted or trashy. 'Little Shop of Horrors' the musical is a class act all the way. It is even a good family film. Yes, there are some dark elements in the film, but life can be very dark. The film spoofs everything from America's love of horror and sci-fi, bad films, to America's shameful urban decay in it's inner cities. The film boldly confronts poverty in America and the desperate, unhappiness of the lives of the people in it. The film is basically sociology put to music. Anyone that finds this film tedious or stupid, is behaving in a really limited and narrow minded way. The film has too much insight and class to be stupid, and there is so much visual humour and design for it to be boring. If you don't like the film it is probably because you can't handle the truth. Life is dark and not everyone is rich and perfect like on 'The Hills'.
5 out of 11 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Feed me...a masterpiece!
Denton_Luke19 March 2005
Warning: Spoilers
As a fanatic of musicals, this film is one of the best movie adaptations of a musical I've seen! Frank oz has captured what the show is really about from the spoof 'B' movie element to the general musical sense. The cast are fantastic (especially Rick Moranis as the down trodden worker turn superstar Seymore Krelborn) and the working of Audrey II is really convincing. And the surprise guests in the film really gives it a 'wow' factor, with John Candy, Bill Murrey and Steve Martin as the manic sadistic dentist, the famous people in it really increases the films greatness The set is brilliant as it seems so realistic to a bum street Sadly the ending doesn't match the show completely but its still good. One of the best I've seen in a long time! Thankyou Mr Oz
5 out of 11 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
1/10
Little Shop of Horrors review
GoodBen16 December 2011
Warning: Spoilers
I didn't really care for this movie that much. I think the singing ruined it for me. I do like the idea of the movie, just not as a musical. I think if this movie wasn't a musical, I might have enjoyed it better. What I did like about the movie was its plot, which I thought was original, funny and dark at times. It's a scifi / musical/ dark comedy about a large, carnivorous plant with a mind of its own that begins to take over the life of Seymour, a nerdy flower shop employee. In addition to the plot, I also liked the acting of Rick Moranis. I think he was good as Seymour. I got the sense that if Seymour had just been braver in life, he wouldn't have needed a plant telling him what to do. I also enjoyed the performance of Vincent Gardenia as the flower shop owner. However, I didn't care for Steven Martian in the role of the sadistic dentist. I didn't find him very threatening or convincing. Also I though Ellen Green as Audrey, the object of Seymour's affections, was annoying.
12 out of 35 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Such a cute, offbeat musical
HotToastyRag30 August 2019
"Little shop, little shop of horrors! Little shop, little shop of terrors!" If you're not tapping your toe and singing along by now, you must not have ever seen this delightful musical. In Frank Oz's film adaptation starring Rick Moranis and Ellen Greene, there's a slight change to the Broadway story, but even if you miss the dark twist from the stage, you'll still love this movie. How can you help it; it's so cute!

If you're not familiar with the story or the musical, it's not your typical Broadway show. This is a far cry from Oklahoma! so be prepared for something a little offbeat when you rent it. Rick Moranis stars as a lowly worker in a flower shop in love with his coworker, Ellen. He thinks that because she's so beautiful, she'd never want anything to do with him, but they have more in common than he thinks. Besides a love of flowers and a shy demeanor, they both grew up in the wrong part of town and get treated badly by those around them. Rick gets verbally abused by his boss, Vincent Gardenia, and Ellen's boyfriend is physically abusive. They both have low self-esteem, and they sing out their woes in the touching ensemble song, "Downtown."

Rick comes across a little Venus flytrap plant and takes it back to the shop. He learns the hard way, through the song "Grow for Me," that the plant refuses water only to drink blood, and it quickly grows and gets out of hand. The rest of the story takes a dark turn, but there's enough comic relief to classify it as a black comedy. Tichina Arnold, Michelle Weeks, and Tisha Campbell are the "Greek chorus" who sing directly to the camera and transition the scenes with songs. Steve Martin is Ellen's boyfriend, a sadistic dentist who likes causing people pain. He's totally hilarious, and playing the role as tongue-in-cheek lightens the story. It's just not possible to get through "The Dentist Song" without cracking up.

The heart of the story depends on your point of view: if you're a guy, you'll probably focus on the lengths a man will go to for the love of his life; if you're a girl, you'll probably think it's a sweet romance. I'm in the latter camp, and every time I watch it, I somehow forget about all the oddities of the plot and just fall for Rick Moranis. What girl in the audience wouldn't want to be serenaded with "Suddenly Seymour"? To my fellow girly girls out there, you'll absolutely love Elaine's costumes. She gets to wear the most darling dresses and shoes! I always wanted to play Audrey onstage, if only to get to put on gorgeous costumes. I love this movie, and watching it always cheers me up. Give it a try when you're feeling down in the dumps and wonder if you'll ever get out of your rut.
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
9/10
"Am I dreaming this?" "No, and you ain't in Kansas, neither."
ryan-100755 August 2019
First off I must say that I love this movie that was wonderfully directed by Frank Oz. Always have since the first time I saw it as a youngster. It is a remake of sorts to the 1960 Roger Corman film under the same title. But, this film is based on the play that was based on that film. This film is filled from beginning to end with great, super-catchy early 60s inspired songs that many of the main characters sing.

The plot is about a nerdy florist Seymour Krelborn (played to perfection by Rick Moranis) who seems to stumble across a new plant that he has growing in the basement of Mushnik's (Vincent Gardenia) where he also works and lives. He has called the plant Audrey II due to his affection for his coworker Audrey (great performance by Ellen Greene). Once he finds out though that it takes blood to feed his new plant he must soon find ways to feed the plant that has given Mushnik's a ton of business.

I must say that apart from the great songs, wonderful puppetry of the Audrey II plant is that the acting to me is top notch. No one gives a below par performance from Steve Martin as the super abusive, drug addicted dentist named Orin Scrivello (don't forget the DDS) who loves to inflict pain on people to Bill Murray who plays Arthur Denton who loves pain and wants Orin to give him a long, slow root canal. The whole time Murray is on screen I am laughing. Martin though in this film must play the worst human being he has ever played that I remember anyways. Martin sings "Dentist!" which might be the funniest song in the film. Audrey II is voiced by Levi Stubbs who sang with The Four Tops and really I think they made the perfect choice as he can really sing, but also really bring out the bad attitude that Audrey II has.

Also starring John Candy, Jim Belushi, Tisha Campbell and Christopher Guest.

So if you think you might like The Muppets Meet 60s B-Movie with 60s styled music with a blend of horror and sci-fi give it a try.
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
8/10
FEED ME!
truemythmedia18 June 2019
I absolutely loved this movie, and I'm kind of upset I didn't go out of my way to see it sooner. This movie is a hysterical parody of 50s monster movies that boasts hysterical moments and cameos, unforgettably catchy songs, and wears its huge sentimental heart on its sleeve; I can't recommend this enough.
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
PopCultureThoughts.Com
popculturethoughts27 April 2019
From the moment it begins, this big-budget adaptation of the Broadway musical (itself an adaptation of the 1960 Roger Corman horror movie co-starring a young Jack Nicholson) is absolute perfection. Rick Moranis and Ellen Greene have effective chemistry and they both manage to sell the central romance at the heart of its maneating-plant narrative, but really this is all about the songs and Frank Oz's direction. From the first frames, it's clear that Oz is in complete control of his medium and has a clear vision for each shot, while the near-constant musical numbers are absolutely incredible, like "Skid Row (Downtown)," "Dentist!" and "Feed Me (Git It)." It's one of those movies where all the elements come together perfectly like lightning in a bottle, and there's palpable passion coming from each shot. [Note: I watched the director's cut with the original ending.]
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
8/10
I do not know if it's a comedy or horror movie!
afonsobritofalves15 April 2019
Warning: Spoilers
I liked it a lot, the story is original, fun and scary (with a very intelligent mood, like the dentist scene), the characters are good and the actors are equally good, the special effects are very good and the soundtrack is wonderful , the sound mix is also very good. I just think it may contain scenes that are too frightening for a children's movie, I mean, the scene of Andrey's death, the scene of Ceymor's death and that ending is certainly not for children. Highly recommend.
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
An amusing musical horror
Tweekums9 September 2017
Warning: Spoilers
Seymour Krelborn lives and works at Mushnik's flower shop on Skid Row; it is not a successful business and looks set to close. Then Seymour produces a strange plant he'd acquired during total solar eclipse a few weeks previously. He has no idea what sort of plant it is and names it Audrey II after his co-worker, a woman he really likes but is in an abusive relationship with a sadistic dentist. Moments after he places it in the window people start visiting the shop and soon business is booming. Audrey II isn't looking well though and he doesn't know what to do. Then he makes a shocking discovery; Audrey II consumes blood. After a few drops it grows and later starts talking… now it wants more than a few drops and demands that Seymour kills to provide food. As Audrey II grows Seymour becomes famous and grows closer the Audrey and learns of Audrey II's ultimate ambition.

When talking about comedy, horror musicals it is almost impossible not to compare it to 'The Rocky Horror Picture Show'; this is not as good as that but trying to judge it on its own it is rather fun. The idea of a man eating plant is entertaining and Audrey II's design is pretty cool; the way it moves is also impressive; not surprising given that Frank Oz directed. The songs are okay but mostly forgettable but there are a couple that stand out namely 'Dentist!' and 'Mean Green Mother from Outer Space'. Rick Moranis and Ellen Greene do fine jobs as Seymour and Audrey but it is Steve Martin who provides the film's most memorable performances as Orin Scrivello the sadistic dentist; he steals every scene he is in. Bill Murray also puts in a fun cameo performance as a masochist who actually enjoys Martin's dentistry. Overall I'd recommend this as it is rather fun and doesn't contain much that might offend.
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Awards | FAQ | User Ratings | External Reviews | Metacritic Reviews


Recently Viewed