Meantime (1983) - News Poster

(1983 TV Movie)

News

Tim Roth to Receive Honorary Heart of Sarajevo Award

  • Variety
Tim Roth to Receive Honorary Heart of Sarajevo Award
British actor Tim Roth is to receive the Honorary Heart of Sarajevo Award in recognition of his “exceptional contribution to the art of film.” The ceremony at the Sarajevo Film Festival will be held on Tuesday. He will hold a masterclass on the same day.

His first screen role was the lead in the controversial Prix Italia award-winning TV movie “Made in Britain.” Roth’s second project came immediately after, starring in Mike Leigh’s critically acclaimed film “Meantime.” As his success continued, Roth starred in more than 15 film and television projects including Stephen Frears’ “The Hit,” for which he won the Standard Award for best newcomer, Peter Greenaway’s “The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover,” Tom Stoppard’s “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead” and Robert Altman’s “Vincent and Theo,” in which he portrayed Vincent Van Gogh.

Roth gained worldwide recognition for his roles in two Quentin Tarantino films,
See full article at Variety »

Criterion Collection Announces December Titles, Including ‘Election’ and ‘Monterey Pop’

  • Indiewire
Criterion Collection Announces December Titles, Including ‘Election’ and ‘Monterey Pop’
The Criterion Collection has unveiled its holiday slate, with “Election” leading the list of titles being released this December. Joining Alexander Payne’s classic in the Collection are a new digital transfer of Barbet Schroeder’s documentary “General Idi Amin Dada: A Self-Portrait,” “The Complete Monterey Pop Festival,” and the previously announced “100 Years of Olympic Films 1912-2012.” More information — and, just as importantly, cover art — below:

Read More:Criterion Collection Announces November Titles, Including Seminal Lesbian Drama ‘Desert Hearts’ and ‘The Philadelphia Story

Election

“Perky, overachieving Tracy Flick (Reese Witherspoon) gets on the nerves of history teacher Jim McAllister (Matthew Broderick) to begin with, but after she launches her campaign for high-school president and his personal life starts to fall apart, things spiral out of control. In Alexander Payne’s satire ‘Election,’ the teacher becomes unhealthily obsessed with cutting his student down to size, covertly backing a spoiler candidate to
See full article at Indiewire »

Tim Roth interview: Tin Star, Reservoir Dogs, Twin Peaks

Louisa Mellor Sep 8, 2017

Tim Roth leads an excellent cast in unpredictable new Sky Atlantic revenge drama Tin Star, out now…

“It’s the disposal,” says Tim Roth. “The killing isn’t the problem, it’s the disposal that’s the problem. You run out of space.” The storage issues faced by serial killers aren’t something to which many of us will have devoted much thought. Roth has. Reassuringly, he’s had reason to thanks to his recent sinister role as real-life murderer Reg Christie in BBC drama Rillington Place. “Charming fella” he jokes.

See related 26 new UK TV shows to look out for Life On Mars: revisiting a terrific UK crime drama Line Of Duty series 4: creator Jed Mercurio interview

Roth is back on UK television on the other side of the law in new Sky Atlantic drama Tin Star, which has already been renewed for a second series.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Blu-ray Review: Mike Leigh's Meantime, A Well-Timed Criterion Release

One of many, many, many films I'd never heard of before Criterion sought to add it to their numbers (number 890 in this case), Mike Leigh's 1984 TV movie Meantime comes across as an unintentional political statement. It pulls us back to Thatcher-era Great Britain to spend some of the titular meantime with a poor white family on the dole, a tyranny of circumstances that quietly drives the lot of them nearly insane. Dad's a layabout malcontent; it's never entirely clear if he's angry about not having work, or at the suggestion that he ought to. Mom's a ceaseless nag with a well-to-do (well, better-to-do) sister to compare her family unfavourably to. Their sons are Colin (Tim Roth) and Mark (Phil Daniels). Colin might be...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Meantime

Nobody stands up for Britons in the lower class trenches like the fierce, opinionated and outright brilliant Mike Leigh; his unusual writing and directing method yields terrific results in his first feature made for TV. And the early performances of Tim Roth, Phil Daniels and Gary Oldman should be the stuff of acting legend, ’80s style.

Meantime

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 890

1984 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 107 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date August 15, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Marion Bailey, Phil Daniels, Tim Roth, Pam Ferris, Jeff Robert, Alfred Molina, Gary Oldman, Tilly Vosburgh, Eileen Davies, Peter Wight.

Cinematography: Roger Pratt

Film Editor: Lesley Walker

Original Music: Andrew Dickson

Produced by Graham Benson

Devised and Directed by Mike Leigh

Mike Leigh is something of an acquired taste, but I have to say that I haven’t forgotten anything of his that I’ve seen. There are of course his ‘special’ period recreations of Topsy-Turvy and Mr. Turner,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The 50 Best Criterion Collection Covers

The 50 Best Criterion Collection Covers
As the Criterion Collection nears the release of their 900th title, we rank the 50 greatest DVD covers the company has ever created.

Related storiesCriterion Collection Announces October Titles, Including 'Personal Shopper' and 'Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me'Criterion Collection Announces September 2017 Titles, Including 'Certain Women' and 'Rebecca'Criterion Collection Announces August 2017 Additions, Including Restored 'Sid & Nancy' and Mike Leigh's 'Meantime'
See full article at Indiewire »

Criterion Collection Announces September 2017 Titles, Including ‘Certain Women’ and ‘Rebecca’

Criterion Collection Announces September 2017 Titles, Including ‘Certain Women’ and ‘Rebecca’
Five new movies are joining the Criterion Collection in September, two of which were released in the last year: Kelly Reichardt’s spare, moving “Certain Women” and the documentary “David Lynch: The Art Life.” Also getting the Criterion treatment are Michael Haneke’s “The Piancho Teacher,” starring Isabelle Huppert; “Rebecca,” Alfred Hitchcock’s adaptation of the Daphne du Maurier novel and his first American production; and Murray Lerner’s documentary “Festival,” which features performances by Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash, among others.

It isn’t Criterion’s most exciting month, but there’s still much to look forward to. Details below, including Criterion’s own descriptions:

Read More: Criterion Collection Announces August 2017 Additions, Including Restored ‘Sid & Nancy’ and Mike Leigh’s ‘Meantime

Rebecca

“Romance becomes psychodrama in Alfred Hitchcock’s elegantly crafted ‘Rebecca,’ his first foray into Hollywood filmmaking. A dreamlike adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s 1938 novel, the film
See full article at Indiewire »

Barry Jenkins’ Favorite Films: 24 Classics Loved By the “Moonlight” Director

Barry Jenkins’ Favorite Films: 24 Classics Loved By the “Moonlight” Director
While doing publicity for “Moonlight,” Barry Jenkins stopped the offices of The Criterion Collection and had the rare opportunity to raid their closet of some of the greatest films ever made. Here’s 24 films Jenkins took home.

Related storiesBarry Jenkins' 'Moonlight': See the Seven Foreign Films That Inspired the Oscar WinnerBarry Jenkins Reacts to 'Moonlight' Becoming A24's Highest-Grossing FilmCriterion Collection Announces August 2017 Additions, Including Restored 'Sid & Nancy' and Mike Leigh's 'Meantime'
See full article at Indiewire »

Newly Restored ‘Sid & Nancy,’ Mike Leigh’s ‘Meantime’ And More Coming To Criterion In August

If you wondering what to spend your summer job money on this summer, The Criterion Collection has a few suggestions, with the boutique label unveiling their August slate. And as per usual, there’s lots to choose from.

First up, Alex Cox‘s “Sid & Nancy,” the company’s twentieth release, is back in print and coming in a new 4K restoration supervised by cinematographer Roger Deakins.

Continue reading Newly Restored ‘Sid & Nancy,’ Mike Leigh’s ‘Meantime’ And More Coming To Criterion In August at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Criterion Collection Announces August 2017 Additions, Including Restored ‘Sid & Nancy’ and Mike Leigh’s ‘Meantime’

Criterion Collection Announces August 2017 Additions, Including Restored ‘Sid & Nancy’ and Mike Leigh’s ‘Meantime’
Late summer is all about reflection over at The Criterion Collection, as the library is spending August offering up a handful of unsung classics and new look at some longtime favorites.

Michael Curitz’s “The Breaking Point,” a mostly overlooked Hemingway adaptation, starring John Garfield and Patricia Neal, will be available on Blu-ray for the first time, while Sacha Guitry’s “La poison” arrives on home video for the first time ever. Elsewhere, Mike Leigh’s revelatory “Meantime” is getting a 2K restoration, all the better to enjoy the early work of Tim Roth and Gary Oldman. That’s not all for Oldman fans, however, as Alex Cox’s “Sid & Nancy” hits the collection with a brand new 4K digital restoration. Finally, Walter Matthau stars in the charming comedy “Hopscotch,” also available on Blu-ray in a 2K digital restoration.

Below is the complete list of August additions, with descriptions provided by Criterion.
See full article at Indiewire »

The top 20 underappreciated films of 1987

From anime to pitch-black thrillers, here's our pick of the underappreciated movies of 1987...

Sometimes, the challenge with these lists isn't just what to put in, but what to leave out. We loved Princess Bride, but with a decent showing at the box office and a huge cult following, isn't it a bit too popular to be described as underappreciated? Likewise Joe Dante's Innerspace, a fabulously geeky, comic reworking of the 60s sci-fi flick, Fantastic Voyage.

What we've gone for instead is a mix of genre fare, dramas and animated films that may have garnered a cult following since, but didn't do well either critically or financially at the time of release. Some of the movies on our list just about made their money back, but none made anything close to the sort of returns enjoyed by the likes of 1987's biggest films - Three Men And A Baby, Fatal Attraction
See full article at Den of Geek »

Mike Leigh to receive BAFTA Fellowship

  • ScreenDaily
Mr Turner director to be honoured this weekend.

BAFTA is to present director Mike Leigh with the Fellowship at its annual film awards this Sunday (Feb 8).

Awarded annually, the Fellowship is the highest accolade bestowed by BAFTA upon an individual in recognition of an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games.

Fellows previously honoured for their work in film include Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Sean Connery, Elizabeth Taylor, Stanley Kubrick, Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Olivier, Judi Dench, Vanessa Redgrave, Christopher Lee, Martin Scorsese and Alan Parker. Helen Mirren received the Fellowship at last year’s Film Awards.

Leigh said: “What a privilege to be honoured with the BAFTA Fellowship. I’m moved, delighted and surprised.”

Amanda Berry OBE, chief executive of BAFTA, described Leigh as “a true innovator, an artist and an exceptional filmmaker”.

This Saturday, the day before the ceremony in London, the writer-director will join a number of close colleagues and friends
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Oscars 2015: Predicting the Nominations

This year's Oscar race has been a thorny one to predict. Despite the emergence early on of a few front-runners in each category -- overall, the race has been dominated by "Boyhood" and "Birdman," with "The Grand Budapest Hotel," "The "Theory of Everything," and "The Imitation Game" close behind -- it's those last few slots on the ballot in each category that are driving prognosticators nuts. Does "Selma" still have a strong shot in its eligible categories, or has the backlash soured Academy members? Is "Whiplash" big enough to make a dent outside the Supporting Actor category? Is "Nightcrawler" too creepy for the Academy?

We'll find out on Thursday, January 15, at 8:30 a.m. Et / 5:30 a.m. Pt, when the Academy announces this year's nominees. Meantime, here are Moviefone's best guesses as to who will earn a seat when the music stops on Thursday and who'll be left standing outside the circle.
See full article at Moviefone »

Gary Oldman Facts: 27 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the British Actor

Whether or not you agree with his recent comments in Playboy, there's no denying Gary Oldman is one of the great actors of our time.

Ever since breaking out in 1986's "Sid and Nancy" as the self-destructing Sex Pistol Sid Vicious, Oldman has transformed himself from one role to the next. A true chameleon, the actor changes his voice for every part and is nearly unrecognizable in films like "True Romance" (1993) and "The Contender" (2000). Despite his enormous influence among fellow actors, Oldman shuns the spotlight and has only once been nominated for an Oscar. Oldman turns in yet another stirring performance (despite limited screen time) in this summer's "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes".

From his famous ex-wife to his rejection from a prestigious drama school, here are 27 things you probably don't know about Gary Oldman.

1. Gary Oldman was born on March 21, 1958 in London, England to Kathleen Cheriton and Leonard Bertram Oldman.
See full article at Moviefone »

Kathy Burke interview: 'Work non-stop? That's not me'

It's been 10 years since Kathy Burke stuck two fingers up at stardom. Here she talks about loving theatre, hating writing – and why Richard Dawkins gives her the hump

'Don't write about how much I'm chain-smoking," grumbles Kathy Burke. "Everyone opens with, 'After the fourth cigarette … ' and it's boring. So don't be doing that, Ryan, else I'll say you're just the same as everyone else." She releases a tight laugh and takes another puff. I mean: takes another sip of rosehip tea.

We're up on the roof of London's Tricycle theatre, sitting on two rickety chairs beneath a blank November sky. Downstairs, Burke has spent the morning directing a new production of Once a Catholic, Mary J O'Malley's comedy set in 1957 at Our Lady of Fatima convent school. Burke is a versatile actor, adored for her populist, prickly comedy: she was Linda, the voracious ginger foghorn with porthole specs in
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Kathy Burke interview: 'Work non-stop? That's not me'

It's been 10 years since Kathy Burke stuck two fingers up at stardom. Here she talks about loving theatre, hating writing – and why Richard Dawkins gives her the hump

'Don't write about how much I'm chain-smoking," grumbles Kathy Burke. "Everyone opens with, 'After the fourth cigarette … ' and it's boring. So don't be doing that, Ryan, else I'll say you're just the same as everyone else." She releases a tight laugh and takes another puff. I mean: takes another sip of rosehip tea.

We're up on the roof of London's Tricycle theatre, sitting on two rickety chairs beneath a blank November sky. Downstairs, Burke has spent the morning directing a new production of Once a Catholic, Mary J O'Malley's comedy set in 1957 at Our Lady of Fatima convent school. Burke is a versatile actor, adored for her populist, prickly comedy: she was Linda, the voracious ginger foghorn with porthole specs in
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Quadrophenia

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Aug. 28, 2012

Price: DVD $29.95, Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Phil Daniels takes Leslie Ash for a spin in Quadrophenia.

The Who’s 1973 rock opera Quadrophenia, a follow-up to their 1969 ground-breaker Tommy (which was made into movie in 1972), goes cinematic in this 1979 British musical drama film by director Franc Roddam (The Bride).

In the defiant, drug-fueled London of the early 1960s. antihero Jimmy (Phil Daniels, Meantime) is a teenager who’s dissatisfied with family, work, and love. He mainly identifies with the fashionable, pill-popping, scooter-driving mods, a group whose opposition to the motorcycle-riding rockers. Jimmy’s feelings, coupled with the groups’ overpowering intentions, leads to a climactic riot in the streets of Brighton.

Roddam’s rough-edged visuals work and Pete Townshend’s brilliant songs (including “I’ve Had Enough,” “5:15,” and “Love, Reign O’er Me”) work smartly together in this chronicle of youthful rebellion and turmoil.

Co-starring Sting (Dune
See full article at Disc Dish »

Sandwiches with Gary Oldman

In 1987, the actor wasn't keen on theatre audiences eating chocolates

In 1987 I met Gary Oldman backstage at Chelsea's Royal Court, where he was playing a corporate raider in Caryl Churchill's Serious Money. Oldman provided tea and cheese sandwiches, then let me watch his makeup being applied.

"Mentally I'm not in London at the moment, I'm in North Carolina working on Nic Roeg's Track 29," he admitted, Cheshire cheese crumbling on to his battered corduroy trousers. "This morning I discovered a shooting schedule in the mail. I'd been hoping the scene in which I assault Theresa Russell would be in week six, but it's the first scene on the first day."

Prick Up Your Ears, in which he played Joe Orton, was shortly to be released, and he explained how he'd "spent many an evening in curry houses drinking Guinness" to look "older, fatter and queenier", whereas to portray
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tim Roth to head Cannes jury

Reservoir Dogs star will lead Un Certain Regard jury, which awards top prize of festival's 'original and different' selection

Tim Roth will head the Un Certain Regard jury at this year's Cannes film festival. The actor and director will lead an as-yet-uannounced group of film-makers and journalists through a shortlist of 20 films competing for the Prix Un Certain Regard – the top prize of the festival's "original and different" selection.

Roth earned international recognition as an actor after starring in Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs, which appeared at the festival in 1992. He was also in Cannes for the launch of Tarantino's Pulp Fiction, which won the Palme d'Or in 1994. His other credits as an actor include work with festival favourites Mike Leigh (Meantime) and Woody Allen (Everyone Says I Love You) as well as an Oscar-nominated turn in Michael Caton-Jones's Rob Roy.

Last year's Prix Un Certain Regard was shared between Arirang,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gary Oldman: from Sid to Smiley: the rollercoaster story of a true British great

Hailed by John Hurt as the 'best of the bunch', Oldman is a working-class hero acclaimed for his acting and directing

Gary Oldman returns to London this weekend in the role of prodigal son, the wayward talent brought in from the cold. He arrives from California to find a landscape very different from the one he left in the early 1990s.

The fiery social-realist BBC teleplays that provided an early calling card have bitten the dust. The cult of the raw-boned working-class British performer has been largely replaced by a roll call of Etonians and Harrovians: a rash of Redmaynes, Hiddlestons and Cumberbatches. And so, at the age of 53, Oldman touches down like some disreputable Rip Van Winkle, a reminder of times gone by. All of which makes him more striking – and arguably more necessary – than he was before.

If they handed out awards for nuance and subtlety, shade and stealth,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

External Sites


Recently Viewed