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Joaquin Phoenix on ‘Joker’: ‘It Was One of the Greatest Experiences of My Career’

  • Variety
Joaquin Phoenix on ‘Joker’: ‘It Was One of the Greatest Experiences of My Career’
Joaquin Phoenix wrestled with playing the Joker before he signed on to Todd Phillips’ latest film. The actor talked about coming to terms with the role at a Q&a following the North American premiere of “Joker” at the Toronto Film Festival on Monday night.

“I mean honestly, it wasn’t an easy decision at first,” Phoenix said. “I didn’t f–king know. I didn’t. But then there was something that was drawing me toward it. It just evolved as we worked together. It started becoming something more than I anticipated. It was one of the greatest experiences of my career.”

Phoenix’s interpretation of the Joker comes as Warner Bros. is trying to revamp the DC Universe, following disappointing results from 2017’s “Justice League” with Batman and Superman. Phillips said he pitched “Joker” to WB executives as an origins story, similar to gritty 1970s and ’80s movies
See full article at Variety »

Venice Film Review: ‘Joker’

  • Variety
Venice Film Review: ‘Joker’
Audiences, as we know, can’t get enough of a great bad guy — the kind we love to hate. The worse he acts, the more we stare. Of course, the fact that we relish a villain doesn’t mean that we’re on his side; getting off on the catchy, scary spectacle of bad behavior isn’t the same as identifying with it. But in “Joker,” Todd Phillips’ hypnotically perverse, ghoulishly grippingly urban-nightmare comic fantasia, Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix), the mentally ill loser-freak who will, down the line, become Batman’s nemesis, stands before us not as a grand villain but as a pathetic specimen of raw human damage. Even as we’re drinking in his screw-loose antics with shock and dismay, there’s no denying that we feel something for him — a twinge of sympathy, or at least understanding.

Early on, Arthur, in full clown regalia, is standing in
See full article at Variety »

Ned Beatty movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Network,’ ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Toy Story 3’

  • Gold Derby
Ned Beatty movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Network,’ ‘Deliverance,’ ‘Toy Story 3’
Happy 82nd birthday to the great Ned Beatty, born on July 6, 1937! In a career that lasted four decades, the now-retired Beatty worked with a number of the greatest film directors in history, starting out with John Boorman and 1972’s “Deliverance,” in which he made his spectacular screen debut. From there, he went on to work with such screen legends as Robert Altman, Sidney Lumet, John Huston, Mike Nichols and Spike Lee.

SEESpike Lee movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

Beatty was nominated for an Academy Award for 1976’s “Network,” directed by Lumet, as well as a Golden Globe Award nomination for portraying an Irish tenor in 1991’s “Hear My Song.” Beatty did not appear in films until he was 35 years old and was immediately pegged as a character actor, a category in which he flourished. His other film credits include “Nashville,” “Superman,” “Wise Blood” and “Toy Story 3.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ned Beatty movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Ned Beatty movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Happy 82nd birthday to the great Ned Beatty, born on July 6, 1937! In a career that lasted four decades, the now-retired Beatty worked with a number of the greatest film directors in history, starting out with John Boorman and 1972’s “Deliverance,” in which he made his spectacular screen debut. From there, he went on to work with such screen legends as Robert Altman, Sidney Lumet, John Huston, Mike Nichols and Spike Lee.

Beatty was nominated for an Academy Award for 1976’s “Network,” directed by Lumet, as well as a Golden Globe Award nomination for portraying an Irish tenor in 1991’s “Hear My Song.” Beatty did not appear in films until he was 35 years old and was immediately pegged as a character actor, a category in which he flourished. His other film credits include “Nashville,” “Superman,” “Wise Blood” and “Toy Story 3.”

So let’s raise a glass of whatever you wish
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sidney Lumet movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Sidney Lumet movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
Sidney Lumet would’ve celebrated his 95th birthday on June 25, 2019. The Oscar-nominated director proved incredibly prolific during his career, directing over 40 movies in 50 years, from his feature debut “12 Angry Men” (1957) through his cinematic farewell “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead” (2007). But how many of those titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1924, Lumet got his start as a child actor, appearing in “One Third of a Nation” (1939) when he was 15 years old. After serving during WWII, he quickly began directing Off-Broadway plays before moving into the burgeoning medium of television, where he helmed hundreds of live teleplays. While working on episodes of “Playhouse 90,” “Kraft Theater” and many more, he honed his abilities to shoot quickly and economically.

His turned to movies with “12 Angry Men,” an adaptation of Reginald Rose
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sidney Lumet movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Network,’ ‘Dog Day Afternoon,’ ’12 Angry Men’

  • Gold Derby
Sidney Lumet movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Network,’ ‘Dog Day Afternoon,’ ’12 Angry Men’
Sidney Lumet would’ve celebrated his 95th birthday on June 25, 2019. The Oscar-nominated director proved incredibly prolific during his career, directing over 40 movies in 50 years, from his feature debut “12 Angry Men” (1957) through his cinematic farewell “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead” (2007). But how many of those titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1924, Lumet got his start as a child actor, appearing in “One Third of a Nation” (1939) when he was 15 years old. After serving during WWII, he quickly began directing Off-Broadway plays before moving into the burgeoning medium of television, where he helmed hundreds of live teleplays. While working on episodes of “Playhouse 90,” “Kraft Theater” and many more, he honed his abilities to shoot quickly and economically.

SEEHenry Fonda movies: 25 greatest films ranked worst to best

His turned to movies with “12 Angry Men,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Curtains: Tony Awards Settle for All-Time Low in Key Demo Ratings and Total Viewers

Nielsen numbers for the 73rd annual Tony Awards have adjusted down, officially settling into an all-time low in both TV ratings and among total viewers.

This year’s James Corden-hosted ceremony settled for a 0.8 rating in the key 18-49 demographic and had 5.404 million total viewers, per Nielsen. The previous lows for the Tonys came in 2012 when the show had a 0.9 rating among adults 18-49 and 6.011 million total viewers.

Sunday’s special faced some significant competition, going up against Game 6 of the NHL Stanley Cup Finals on NBC. The hockey game adjusted in the opposite direction of the Tonys, ending up with a 2.0 rating and 6.5 million viewers.

Also Read: Ratings: Kevin Durant's NBA Finals Return - and Subsequent Exit - in Game 5 Dominates for ABC

New musical “Hadestown” earned eight wins on Sunday, including for director Rachel Chavkin, composer Anaïs Mitchell and featured actor André De Shields. Jez Butterworth
See full article at The Wrap »

Broadway Box Office Hits Pre-Tony $35M; ‘Network’ Signs Off On Schedule With Bryan Cranston Win & House Records

The annual post-Tony shake-out of Broadway closings has yet to get underway, but the pre-scheduled departure of Network last week saw the Bryan Cranston starrer set a couple of records on its way out, contributing $1.1M to Broadway’s total weekly $35M gross for Week 2 of the season.

In all, the tally for Week 2 for the 37 productions was $35,439,599, a small 3% bump over the previous week. Attendance held steady at 306,842.

Most productions saw at least some modest increases at the box office in the week leading up to the big night, though whatever boosts from wins or the broadcast performances of musical numbers themselves mightn’t be immediately apparent. The TodayTix ticket-selling platform tells Deadline that Hadestown, The Ferryman and Oklahoma! saw sales boosts on its platform of between 31% and 47% during the Sunday night broadcast on CBS, with more modest but still significant increases the following morning.
See full article at Deadline »

Broadway Box Office Begins New Season With A Hold-Steady $35M

In the Tony Awards homestretch, Broadway productions slipped only a tad in the post-Memorial Day holiday week, with total box office for the 38 productions sliding a negligible 4% to $34,573,185. Attendance for the first week of the new Broadway season – the week ending June 2 – was off only 3% from the holiday take, with 306,164 ticket-buyers in seats.

Two productions opened during Week 1, with Terrence McNally’s well-reviewed Frankie And Johnny In The Clair De Lune, starring Audra McDonald and Michael Shannon at the Broadhurst, grossing $274,391, a small 23% of potential, attributable at least in part to opening night comps and press seats. Attendance was about 52% of capacity. Next week’s figures might better suggest whether those good reviews will translate at the b.o. Frankie And Johnny, which opened after the close of the Tony nomination period, has been left out of the awards hubbub.

The other opener was musician Yanni, playing a five-performance week
See full article at Deadline »

Here’s What’s New to Netflix in June 2019

Netflix has announced the new titles arriving to their streaming service in June 2019. As always, there’s loads of Netflix Originals which may be good or bad but serve their purpose of being Content. Notable titles arriving in June include Black Mirror: Season 5, Documentary Now!: Season 3, Grey’s Anatomy: Season 15, Neon Genesis Evangelion, 20th Century Women, Ralph Breaks the Internet, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, A.I. Artificial Intelligence, Batman Begins, Good Night, and Good Luck, Cabaret, Magic Mike, Network, Platoon, and The Dark Knight. Check out the full list of new titles below and …
See full article at Collider.com »

Broadway Box Office Finds Pre-Tony Groove At $35M; ‘Tootsie’, ‘Cher Show’ & ‘Hadestown’ Score $1M+

Broadway settled into its pre-Tony wait-and-see groove last week, with box office for most shows hovering just above, below or on par with the previous week. In all, the 37 productions took in $35.1 million for the 2018-19 season’s Week 51, a small 5% dip from the previous week. Total attendance was 310,574, a 2% drop.

The previous week, not so incidentally, had one additional production on the boards – Morrissey’s $1.9 million seven-night residency at the Lunt-Fontanne – which certainly accounts for a hefty chunk of last week’s $1.8 million drop in overall box office.

Also contributing to the week’s slip: Burn This, starring Keri Russell and Adam Driver, played only six performances (two fewer than usual) to accommodate Driver’s trip to the Cannes Film Festival to promote his upcoming film The Dead Don’t Die. The play grossed $177,919 less than the previous week, coming in at $676,047. The Hudson Theatre was 96% full for those six shows,
See full article at Deadline »

Morrissey Sings $1.9M Tune At Lunt-Fontanne; Total Broadway Weekly Box Office Hits $37M

No moping for Morrissey’s Broadway box office: The former Smith’s frontman grossed $1.9M for his seven-night residence at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, playing to near-capacity crowds.

The strong showing was typical of a generally upbeat Week 50 on Broadway (ending May 12), with 38 productions taking in $36,855,347, an 8% bump over the previous week. Total attendance was up 7%, to 316,359.

The well-reviewed Morrissey, though not officially a part of the Lunt-Fontanne’s upcoming In Residence On Broadway series, suggests producers might be on to something with the idea – at least with performers backed by a fan base as loyal as the one that’s stuck with Morrissey all these years. Attendance for the seven performances – which spanned two Broadway weeks – was 10,085, about 96% of capacity. Average ticket price was $187.

Elsewhere in the district, the new strong just got stronger, with Tootsie settling into the $1M+ turf, grossing $1,409,488, a solid $150,000+ over the previous week, with attendance at 92% capacity at the Marquis.
See full article at Deadline »

Santino Fontana Wears ‘Tootsie’ For The 21st Century (And Tells What Had To Go) – Tony Watch Q&A

Last week, Tootsie joined Broadway’s million dollar club – the choice group of productions that break the $1 million mark in weekly box office. Along with 11 Tony Award nominations and a star-making turn by lead actor Santino Fontana, the musical adaptation of the 1982 film comedy starring Dustin Hoffman can, in retrospect, seem like a no-brainer, the type of Broadway success that complainers complain about when they gripe over Hollywood pedigrees.

But take a closer look at To Kill A Mockingbird, Network, Pretty Woman, Beetlejuice and Tootsie, and what jumps out are their differences, specifically their varying approaches to their source material. Mockingbird went meta, Network post-modern high tech. Pretty Woman could have benefited from less respect for its celluloid self, Beetlejuice from more.

Of the musicals, Tootsie found the sweetest balance between old and new, all the more surprising given what would seem, at first consideration, a storyline and worldview best left to the ’80s.
See full article at Deadline »

Sylvester Stallone Signs With CAA

  • Deadline
Exclusive: CAA has signed iconic actor, writer, director and producer Sylvester Stallone and his Balboa Productions.

Stallone had been with Wme. He is coming off a reprise of his Rocky Balboa character in Creed 2. This after getting a Best Supporting Actor nom for Creed, which occurred 40 years after his first Oscar nom for the original Rocky. He also got a Best Original Screenplay nom that year when Rocky shocked Hollywood by beating out films including Network, Taxi Driver and All the President’s Men for Best Picture. That was only the second time an actor got nominated for the same role and the time span between Stallone’s nominations was unprecedented.

Stallone next reprises another iconic character when Rambo: Last Blood opens September 20 for Lionsgate, bound to extend the $728 million that the Rambo series has grossed worldwide. Stallone also created and stars in The Expendables franchise, which has grossed over $800 million globally.
See full article at Deadline »

Broadway Box Office Hits $38M With Final Four Shows Of Season; ‘Tootsie’ Takes $959,001

Broadway settled back a bit last week, slipping about 5% to $38,151,116 from the previous week’s Easter-bumped receipts. Total attendance for the 36 shows during Week 48 was down a small 3% to 316,868.

The week was a busy one (especially for critics), with the opening nights of the final four Tony-eligible productions of the 2018/19 season. In chronological order (and keeping in mind all those press previews and opening night comps):

All My Sons, starring Annette Bening, Tracy Letts and Benjamin Walker at the nonprofit Roundabout’s subscription-heavy American Airlines Theatre, opened April 22 to near-full houses. Box office was $447,448; Tootsie opened to strong reviews at the Marquis on April 23, with 91% of seats filled for seven performances, heavily comped. Receipts of $959,001 reflected about 64% of potential; Ink, opened April 24 at the nonprofit subscription-heavy Manhattan Theatre Club’s Samuel J. Friedman Theatre, and took in $327,495, 90% of seats filled; Beetlejuice opened at the Winter Garden
See full article at Deadline »

Ken Kercheval Dies: ‘Dallas’ Actor Was 83

  • Deadline
Ken Kercheval Dies: ‘Dallas’ Actor Was 83
Actor Ken Kercheval, best known as Texas businessman Cliff Barnes on the CBS series Dallas, has died. A cause of death is not known, but a spokesperson at the Frist Funeral Home in the actor’s hometown of Clinton, Indiana, told Deadline that Kercheval died Sunday. He was 83.

Kercheval’s character was a signature presence on Dallas — along with his bitter rival J.R. Ewing (Larry Hagman), Barnes was the only character to appear in all 14 seasons (1978-1991) of the soapy saga about Texas crude and crude Texans. The character was originally modeled on Robert F. Kennedy but that template didn’t hold for long. Instead Barnes was defined by his family’s rivalry with the Ewings and his character was spun in varied directions as needed — his job title, for instance, changed a dozen times over the course of the series.

Kercheval was also in the 1986 prequel Dallas: The Early Years, a TV movie that fleshed out the franchise’s central conflict, the rivalry between the two oil industry families. Kercheval also returned to the character for the 1996 television movie Dallas: J.R. Returns and then again for three seasons (2012-2014) of a Dallas revival, which presented the career-bouncing Barnes as a casino industry player.

Dallas also gave Kercheval a chance to experiment with job directions himself: He went behind the camera to direct an episode of the series in each of its final two seasons.

Kercheval was born July 15, 1935, in Wolcottville, Ind., and raised in nearby Clinton. A music and drama major at Indiana University he later studied at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York. Kercheval began his professional acting career on the stage, making his Broadway debut in the 1962 play Something About A Soldier. He went on to appear Off-Broadway in 1972’s Berlin to Broadway with Kurt Weill revue. His other theatre credits include The Apple Tree, Cabaret (replacing Bert Convy as Cliff), and Here’s Where I Belong. He also appeared as the title character in the original Broadway production of Fiddler on the Roof, co-starring with Herschel Bernardi, Maria Karnilova, Julia Migenes, Leonard Frey, and Pia Zadora.

It was television, however, where Kercheval became a face familiar to millions. His credits included appearances on E.R., L.A. Law,, Murder She Wrote, CHiPs, Highway to Heaven, Kojak, The Love Boat, Matlock, and Starsky & Hutch. His film credits include Network, The Seven-Ups and F.I.S.T. in the 1970s.
See full article at Deadline »

Ken Kercheval, Cliff Barnes on ‘Dallas,’ Dies at 83

  • Variety
Ken Kercheval, Cliff Barnes on ‘Dallas,’ Dies at 83
Ken Kercheval, who played oil tycoon Cliff Barnes, the rival of Larry Hagman’s J.R. Ewing on “Dallas,” has died. He was 83.

A spokeswoman at Frist Funeral Home in Kercheval’s hometown of Clinton, Ind., confirmed his death on Wednesday to Variety, but did not provide additional information.

Kercheval and Hagman were the only two stars who appeared on CBS’ soap opera “Dallas” for its entire 14-season run between 1978 to 1991. Kercheval was a recurring character for the first two seasons, but was then upped to a regular in the 1979-1980 season. He reprised his role in the 1996 “Dallas” reunion, the 2004 CBS reunion special and the 2012-2014 TNT revival. He was among five series stars who directed episodes, taking the helm for two episodes for Seasons 13-14.

When “Dallas” viewers asked him when Cliff was “finally going to get J.R.,” Kercheval always answered: “This Friday night!”

In the 1960s,
See full article at Variety »

William Holden movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Network,’ ‘Stalag 17’

  • Gold Derby
William Holden movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Sunset Boulevard,’ ‘Network,’ ‘Stalag 17’
William Holden would’ve celebrated his 101st birthday on April 17, 2019. The Oscar-winning performer starred in dozens of movies, remaining active until his untimely death in 1981. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1918, Holden made his film debut with a starring role in the boxing drama “Golden Boy” (1939) when he was just 21 years old. Though his career lagged for the next decade, he came roaring back with Billy Wilder‘s Hollywood noir “Sunset Boulevard” (1950), playing a struggling screenwriter who becomes involved with a fading, delusional silent film star (Gloria Swanson). The role brought him his first Oscar nomination as Best Actor.

SEEOscar Best Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

He joined the winner’s circle just three years later with a Best Actor victory for Wilder
See full article at Gold Derby »

William Holden movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
William Holden movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
William Holden would’ve celebrated his 101st birthday on April 17, 2019. The Oscar-winning performer starred in dozens of movies, remaining active until his untimely death in 1981. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1918, Holden made his film debut with a starring role in the boxing drama “Golden Boy” (1939) when he was just 21 years old. Though his career lagged for the next decade, he came roaring back with Billy Wilder‘s Hollywood noir “Sunset Boulevard” (1950), playing a struggling screenwriter who becomes involved with a fading, delusional silent film star (Gloria Swanson). The role brought him his first Oscar nomination as Best Actor.

He joined the winner’s circle just three years later with a Best Actor victory for Wilder’s “Stalag 17” (1953), which cast him as a cynical American
See full article at Gold Derby »

Olitz date at the Tonys? ‘Scandal’ stars Kerry Washington and Tony Goldwyn are gunning for nominations

Olitz date at the Tonys? ‘Scandal’ stars Kerry Washington and Tony Goldwyn are gunning for nominations
Olivia and Fitz presumably went off to Vermont to make jam for the rest of their lives after he picked her up in last year’s series finale of “Scandal.” But their portrayers, Kerry Washington and Tony Goldwyn, have been busy on the Great White Way, which means we could be treated to an Olitz reunion at the Tony Awards.

Washington headlined “American Son,” which ended its limited two-month run on Jan. 27. She’s currently in sixth place in our Best Actress in a Play odds for the production, which follows an estranged interracial couple who reunites at a police station when their teenage son goes missing. This would be the first Tony bid for Washington, who was twice Emmy-nominated for “Scandal.” Glenda Jackson (“King Lear”), Laurie Metcalf (“Hillary and Clinton”), Elaine May (“The Waverly Gallery”), Annette Bening (“All My Sons”) and Laura Donnelly (“The Ferryman”) are the predicted top five.
See full article at Gold Derby »
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