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The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967) Poster

Trivia

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For the massacre scene in the garage, the actors playing the slain gangsters were shown photos and directed as how to fall so their positions were identical to the real photos of the massacre. Two actors bumped together on the way down. After studying photographs they realized they had fallen and collided in the exact way the slain gangsters had fallen and had landed in the correct positions.
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Jack Nicholson was to play Johnny May (Bruce Dern), but instead shows up in a bit part as a henchman, Gino, loading garlic-soaked bullets into a Tommy gun (Nicholson was still paid for all seven weeks of the shoot.)
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Orson Welles was originally picked by director Roger Corman to play Al Capone, while Jason Robards, Jr. was to play George "Bugs" Moran. Welles was willing but Fox vetoed the deal, feeling Welles was "undirectable". Robards took over the role of Capone and Ralph Meeker was brought in to play Moran.
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The real garage where the massacre took place (2122 N. Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois) was torn down three months after the movie was released.
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More squib charges were used in this film than in the three-hour war epic The Longest Day (1962).
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At the beginning of the movie when Peter Gusenberg (George Segal) asks the barkeep where he's getting his beer from, the barkeep answers, "A fellow named Slausen", to which Gusenberg replies, "Slausen? The only Slausen I know works for Caponi, Al Caponi." Believe it or not, Gusenberg's pronunciation of Al Capone's name is in fact a source of debate amongst historians. Though he's known as "Capone" with an "E", early arrest sheets and Chicago Tribune articles listed Capone's name as "Caponi" with an "I". However, the Chicago Tribune was known at the time for their blatant spelling errors (like "clew" for "clue") and may be responsible for this misconception of Capone's name.
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This was Roger Corman's first directorial project for one of the major studios (20th Century-Fox). After approximately 15 years experience as a producer and director of low-budget productions, it was no surprise that HE wrapped this production ahead of schedule and well under budget.
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The film came in at $200,000 under budget, because Roger Corman re-used sets from other movies, including a mansion that served as Capone's home (even though in reality Al Capone lived in a modest brick house in a working-class neighborhood).
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When "Bugs" Moran is leaving his hotel just before the massacre, the clerk stops him and says, "You have a call from a Mr. Bernstein in Detroit". "Bernstein" was the last name of the four brothers--Abe, Joe, Ray and Izzy--who ran Detroit's murderous "Purple Gang". The real George "Bugs" Moran and Al Capone used the Bernsteins to hijack other gangsters' liquor shipments from Canada. This fact is evident later when Moran complains to his bodyguards about Bernstein jacking up the price.
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Final film of Jean Hale.
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The set used as a brothel also served the same function in Fox's The Sand Pebbles (1966).
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Although the film came in for $2.1 million--having originally been budgeted for $2.5 million--and was thus by far the most expensive film of Roger Corman's career to that time, he insisted that he could have shaved an extra $1 million off the budget (without changing the script or hiring different and less expensive actors) if he had been allowed to make the film all on Chicago locations with a mostly non-union crew instead of in the Hollywood studios. He also finished the film four days ahead of schedule.
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Average Shot Length = ~9.2 seconds. Median Shot Length = ~8.4 seconds.
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Features two future multiple Academy Award winners, Jason Robards and Jack Nicholson, one future Academy Award nominee, Bruce Dern; and George Segal, who had nominated for Best Supporting Actor for 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?', the previous year.
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In the scene where the killer played by (uncredited) Jack Nicholson is rubbing garlic in his bullets and says the garlic will cause blood poisoning, that was actually a Sicilian practice of rubbing garlic on their bullets to create gangrenous wounds. It didn't really work, but it became a habit among Chicago killers.
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Roger Corman's "first big studio film", according to "Variety".
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Jean Hale does not appear until the 47-minute mark.
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This was Roger Corman's first major studio production. He didn't forget his unofficial stock company and cast some of them in this film, including Dick Miller, Jonathan Haze, Betsy-Jones Moreland, Barboura Morris and Jack Nicholson.
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In bit parts, the two assassins disguised as police officers were played by Roger Corman alumni Dick Miller and Jonathan Haze.
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Frank Silvera plays the same historical character he played several years earlier in the television play "Seven Against The Wall" (in the "Playhouse 90" series), dealing with the same subject.
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Final film of Kurt Kreuger.
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In one scene, Pete Gusenberg pronounces Al Capone's surname with three syllables ("Ca-po-ne"). Although this was meant to be derogatory in this context, that was the actual pronunciation in the original Italian (the way that a name like Leone is pronounced "Le-o-ne"). In the United States, it was common for many immigrants to anglicize their original names.
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In the Apartment fight scene between Jean Hale and George Segal there were some actual connections between the two when the ruckus commenced. The bed scene Jean actually did connect to George's manhood and in one of the tosses of Jean by George she ended up with a bruised back from landing wrong.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The movie's mostly historical accuracy also includes some of the real words spoken by those involved in the massacre. Frank Guesenberg's dying answer to the police officer's inquiry really was, "Nobody shot me. Leave me alone". George "Bugs" Moran really did exclaim to a reporter, "Only Al Capone kills like that." Capone responded to the press: "Only Moran kills like that. I mean, they don't call that guy 'Bugs' for nothing!"
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Although most of the facts in the film are close to the truth, the only real deviation concerns the fate of Joe Aiello. While the movie does accurately portray Aiello aligning himself with George "Bugs" Moran, and conspiring to kill Mafia chieftain Pasqualino "Patsy" Lolordo, he was not killed personally by Al Capone on a train (though Capone was known to kill when seized by a fit of personal rage). As shown in the film, Aiello, knowing he was marked for death by Capone, did arrange to have a cousin purchase a train ticket for him at the last minute so that he could skip town. However, he was killed by machine gunners from an apartment window opposite his apartment building as he was leaving to catch the train on October 23, 1930--one year and nine months after the massacre, not before.
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