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‘Watchmen’s’ Jeremy Irons to Head Jury at Berlin Film Festival

  • Variety
‘Watchmen’s’ Jeremy Irons to Head Jury at Berlin Film Festival
British actor Jeremy Irons, who plays Ozymandias in the HBO series “Watchmen” and won an Oscar in 1991 for “Reversal of Fortune,” will serve as president of the International Jury at the 70th Berlin Intl. Film Festival, the event revealed Thursday.

Berlinale artistic director Carlo Chatrian said: “With his distinctive style Jeremy Irons has embodied some iconic characters that have accompanied me throughout my journey in cinema, making me aware of the complexity of human beings. His talent and the choices he has taken both as an artist and as a citizen make me feel proud to welcome him as president of the jury for the 70th edition of the Berlinale.”

Irons said: “It is with feelings of great pleasure and not inconsiderable honor that I take on the role of president of the International Jury for the Berlinale 2020, a festival that I have admired for so long and that I have always enjoyed attending.
See full article at Variety »

French Author Under Fire for Child Abuse; Publisher Pulls His Books

  • Variety
French Author Under Fire for Child Abuse; Publisher Pulls His Books
Following the recent accusations against the filmmakers Christophe Ruggia and Roman Polanski, France is having a third belated #metoo moment with the scandal surrounding Gabriel Matzneff, a French writer who’s been critically revered even though he’s bragged about having sex with teenagers for four decades.

Matzneff, now 83, is the author of “Under 16 Years Old,” among his many books promoting sex with minors. He just wrote a new book, “The Lover at the Arsenal,” published by the leading French publishing house Gallimard.

Gallimard has now pulled all of Matzneff’s books, including his latest, according to media reports.

The scandal erupted immediately after the publication on Jan. 2 of “The Consent,” a book written by Vanessa Springora, who recounts how she was manipulated by V., a powerful man in his 50s, when she met him at the age of 14 and got involved with him. She also recounts her disillusionment when
See full article at Variety »

Remembering Celebrities Who Died in 2019

  • Variety
Remembering Celebrities Who Died in 2019
The man inside the yellow Big Bird suit; TV’s Rhoda; and a “Beverly Hills 90210” heartthrob are just a few of the beloved entertainment figures who died in 2019. Here are some of the unforgettable stars and creators of movies, TV and music who we lost this year.

Movies

Several notable directors died in 2019, including pioneering French New Wave director Agnes Varda, who died March 29 at 90. “Singin’ in the Rain” director Stanley Donen died Feb. 21 at 94, while cult movie director Larry Cohen, who helmed “It’s Alive,” died March 23 at 77. “Boyz N the Hood” director John Singleton suffered a stroke and died April 29 at 51, and renowned documentarian D.A. Pennebaker, who made “Don’t Look Back,” died Aug. 1 at 94. “Romeo and Juliet” director Franco Zeffirelli died June 15 at 96. The colorful studio executive and producer of “Chinatown” and many other films, Robert Evans, died Oct. 26 at 89.

Movie stars who died in 2019 included Doris Day,
See full article at Variety »

Sue Lyon obituary

Actor who played Lolita in the controversial film based on Vladimir Nabokov’s novel of the same name

A much celebrated movie poster shows Sue Lyon peering over a pair of heart-shaped sunglasses while sucking a red lollipop under the legend “How did they ever make a movie of Lolita?” The answer lay in the casting of 14-year-old Lyon in the title role of Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptation of the controversial Vladimir Nabokov novel, in which Lolita is 12 years old.

Although Kubrick later complained about having to stick to the Hollywood Production Code, he said of Lyon, who has died aged 73, “she’s a one-in-a-million find”, and Nabokov thought her “the perfect nymphet”, a noun he coined in his 1955 novel. Her performance in Lolita (1962), her first feature, won the Golden Globe for most promising newcomer. Few film actors can claim such a prestigious start to their careers.

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sue Lyon, Kubrick's Lolita, dies aged 73

Actor who starred in the controversial 1962 adaptation of Nabokov’s novel as a 14-year-old never matched its impact in her subsequent career

Sue Lyon, who at age 14 played the title character in the 1962 film adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov’s controversial novel Lolita, has died at age 73.

Longtime friend Phil Syracopoulos told The New York Times she died on Thursday in Los Angeles. He gave no cause of death.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sue Lyon, Star of Stanley Kubrick's Lolita, Dies at 73

Sue Lyon, Star of Stanley Kubrick's Lolita, Dies at 73
Actress Sue Lyon, best known for her role in Stanley Kubrick‘s adaptation of Lolita, has died, The New York Times reported. She was 73.

Lyon died on Thursday in Los Angeles, according to the newspaper. A longtime friend of the actress told the Times that she had been experiencing declining health for a while.

Lyon’s film and television career spanned 1959 to 1980, with her breakout role being the titular character in 1962’s Lolita. Based on the controversial novel by Vladimir Nabokov, the story follows a middle-aged professor who becomes sexually obsessed with Dolores Haze, a 12-year-old girl, whom he nicknames “Lolita.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Sue Lyon, Star of Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Lolita,’ Dead at 73

Sue Lyon, Star of Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Lolita,’ Dead at 73
Sue Lyon, the actress who played the title role in Stanley Kubrick’s controversial 1962 film Lolita, has died at the age of 73.

Lyon’s friend Phil Syracopoulos confirmed the actress’ death to the New York Times, noting that she died in Los Angeles Thursday following a period of declining health. No cause of death was provided.

The Iowa-born Lyon, then 14 with only a handful of small television roles to her credit, was cast over the 800 young actresses who reportedly auditioned for the role of Dolores Haze in the adaptation of
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Sue Lyon Dies: ‘Lolita’ Star Was 73

  • Deadline
Sue Lyon Dies: ‘Lolita’ Star Was 73
Actress Sue Lyon passed away in Los Angeles on Dec. 26. She was 73. According to Lyon’s longtime friend Phil Syracopoulous, cited by the New York Times, the actress’ health had been declining for some time.

Lyon was best known for her first major role. She was picked out of 800 young actresses who had auditioned to play the title character in the controversial 1962 film Lolita when she was just 14 years old.

In Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov’s famous novel, about a middle-aged college professor who becomes infatuated with a teen nymphet, Lyon starred opposite James Mason. Her performance earned Lyon the Golden Globe in the most promising newcomer-female in 1963.

Lyion’s followup to Lolita was a co-starring role opposite Richard Burton, Ava Gardner and Deborah Kerr in the John Huston-directed 1964 feature The Night Of the Iguana. She went on to appear in two dozen movies and TV show,
See full article at Deadline »

‘Lolita’ Star Sue Lyon Dies at 73

  • Variety
‘Lolita’ Star Sue Lyon Dies at 73
Sue Lyon, who was cast in Stanley Kubrick’s “Lolita” at the age of 14, died Thursday in Los Angeles. She was 73.

Lyon’s longtime friend Phil Syracopoulos told the New York Times she had been experiencing poor health for some time.

Lyon’s acting career lasted from 1959 to 1980, with her most significant role as the title character in the 1962 Kubrick film based on Vladimir Nabokov’s novel about a middle-aged man who becomes sexually obsessed with a young girl. Lyon earned the part over 800 girls that auditioned; Nabokov described her as “the perfect nymphet.”

While Nabokov’s 1955 novel was seen as scandalous, the film was less so due in part to the restrictive Motion Picture Production Code.

Lyon was born in Davenport, Iowa. Her mother moved the family to Dallas before relocating them to Los Angeles, where Lyon was able to pursue acting. She landed the role of Laurie in
See full article at Variety »

Sue Lyon, Star of Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Lolita,’ Dies at 73

  • The Wrap
Sue Lyon, Star of Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Lolita,’ Dies at 73
Sue Lyon, the actress who at age 14 starred as the title character in Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of “Lolita,” died Thursday in Los Angeles. She was 73.

Lyon had been in failing health for some time, her friend Phil Syracopoulos told The New York Times.

Born Suellyn Lyon in 1946 in Iowa, Lyon’s family moved to Los Angeles when she was a small child. As a teenager, she began acting in small television roles, including an appearance on “The Loretta Young Show” that brought her to Kubrick’s attention. She was subsequently cast in “Lolita” at 14 in part because the filmmakers aged the character up from 12, as in Vladimir Nabokov’s novel. Upon release, Lyon was catapulted to stardom, and she won the Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer — Female for her performance, which had her acting alongside James Mason, Shelley Winters, and Peter Sellers, some of the era’s biggest stars.
See full article at The Wrap »

Stanley Kubrick movies: All 13 films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Stanley Kubrick movies: All 13 films ranked worst to best
Stanley Kubrick would’ve celebrated his 91st birthday on July 26, 2019. The notoriously meticulous filmmaker only completed 13 features before his death in 1999, but several of those titles remain groundbreaking classics, spanning a variety of genres and themes. So in honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 13 of those films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1928 in New York City, Kubrick got his start as a photographer for Look magazine before directing short documentaries. His first features, “Fear and Desire” (1953) and “Killer’s Kiss” (1955), were produced out of his own pocket on shoestring budgets. It was with the noir thriller “The Killing” (1956) and the antiwar drama “Paths of Glory” (1957) that his talent fully blossomed, and before long he was helming the epic “Spartacus” (1960) and an adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov‘s controversial novel “Lolita” (1962), both of which brought him Golden Globe nominations for Best Director.

He hit the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Stanley Kubrick movies: All 13 films, ranked worst to best, including ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ ‘A Clockwork Orange’

  • Gold Derby
Stanley Kubrick movies: All 13 films, ranked worst to best, including ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ ‘A Clockwork Orange’
Stanley Kubrick would’ve celebrated his 91st birthday on July 26, 2019. The notoriously meticulous filmmaker only completed 13 features before his death in 1999, but several of those titles remain groundbreaking classics, spanning a variety of genres and themes. So in honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 13 of those films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1928 in New York City, Kubrick got his start as a photographer for Look magazine before directing short documentaries. His first features, “Fear and Desire” (1953) and “Killer’s Kiss” (1955), were produced out of his own pocket on shoestring budgets. It was with the noir thriller “The Killing” (1956) and the antiwar drama “Paths of Glory” (1957) that his talent fully blossomed, and before long he was helming the epic “Spartacus” (1960) and an adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov‘s controversial novel “Lolita” (1962), both of which brought him Golden Globe nominations for Best Director.

SEEKirk Douglas movies:
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Forgotten: Sub Sub

  • MUBI
James B. Harris is still with us, still wants to make films I believe, but has slipped below radar. His odd, discontinuous and peripatetic directing career, which has resulted in some remarkable works, has been consigned to footnote status below his early period as Stanley Kubrick's producer on The Killing, Lolita and Dr. Strangelove.I met Mr. Harris briefly at a party on a boat during the Lumière Film Festival in Lyons, but didn't get a chance to talk much as he was soon up on his feet dancing to Blondie. He was around 85 at the time. If "Heart of Glass" still gets you on your feet, there should be a rule that says you're still allowed to make movies.The Bedford Incident (1965) was Harris's directorial debut, and also the first film where Sidney Poitier plays a role in which his race is not mentioned or relevant to the plot.
See full article at MUBI »

Stanley Kubrick’s Lost Script ‘Burning Secret’ Set for Auction, Draws ‘Lolita’ and ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ Comparisons

Stanley Kubrick’s Lost Script ‘Burning Secret’ Set for Auction, Draws ‘Lolita’ and ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ Comparisons
“Burning Secret,” the long lost Stanley Kubrick script that was discovered over the summer, is being auctioned off later this month at Bonhams New York, Deadline reports. The original manuscript is expected to sell in the $20,000 region, so now the question remains whether or not anyone in the film industry will jump at the chance to buy the script and turn it into a feature film.

As reported earlier this year, “Burning Secret” is an adaptation of Stefan Zweig’s novella of the same name. Kubrick co-wrote the script with Calder Willingham in 1956, shortly before making “Paths of Glory.” The script was discovered by Bangor University film professor Nathan Abrams, and while many would assume studios would jump at the chance to make the film (Netflix just released Orson Welles’ long-delayed “The Other Side of the Wind”), the film’s subject matter is controversial.

Abrams has described “Burning Secret” as “the inverse of ‘Lolita,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Lost’ Stanley Kubrick Script ‘Burning Secret’ Up For Auction; Would A Film Or TV Company Bite On It Today?

  • Deadline
‘Lost’ Stanley Kubrick Script ‘Burning Secret’ Up For Auction; Would A Film Or TV Company Bite On It Today?
Long-lost Stanley Kubrick script Burning Secret is up for auction at Bonhams New York on 20 November. The original manuscript is expected to fetch in the region of $20,000.

The script, which has been certified by Kubrick experts, is said to be virtually complete, begging the question, would a film or TV company take it on today? We’ve just had a semi-complete Orson Welles movie pieced together, after all.

Entitled Burning Secret, the script is an adaptation of the 1913 novella by the acclaimed and often-adapted Austrian writer Stefan Zweig. In Kubrick’s adaptation of the story, a suave insurance salesman befriends a 10-year-old boy at a spa resort so he is able seduce the child’s married mother. In Zweig’s original, the story is set in Austria but Kubrick’s script transfers the story to America of the 1950s with American characters.

The visionary filmmaker wrote it in 1956 with American
See full article at Deadline »

Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Lost’ Screenplay ‘Burning Secret’ Unearthed

Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Lost’ Screenplay ‘Burning Secret’ Unearthed
A “lost” screenplay co-written by Stanley Kubrick in 1956 has been unearthed.

Burning Secret, penned by Kubrick and novelist Calder Willingham, was adapted from a 1913 novella by Viennese author Stefan Zweig. It was originally planned as Kubrick’s next film following his noir classic The Killing. However, Kubrick and Willingham instead collaborated on the anti-war film Paths of Glory.

While Kubrick historians knew about the filmmaker’s intention to make Burning Secret, they didn’t know that he had written a 100-page screenplay for the film. The screenplay was stamped by
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Burning Secret’: Stanley Kubrick’s Once-Lost Screenplay Has Been Found 60 Years Later — and Could Be Made Into a Film

‘Burning Secret’: Stanley Kubrick’s Once-Lost Screenplay Has Been Found 60 Years Later — and Could Be Made Into a Film
Nearly 20 years after his death, Stanley Kubrick continues to fascinate and confound. The endlessly influential filmmaker is almost as notable for the films he didn’t make as he is for those he did, and it now appears one of those lost projects may not actually be lost: “Burning Secret.”

Kubrick co-wrote the adaptation of Stefan Zweig’s novella of the same name with Calder Willingham in 1956, shortly before making “Paths of Glory.” The script has been found by Nathan Abrams, a film professor at Bangor University, according to the Guardian. “I couldn’t believe it,” the Kubrick scholar said of the discovery. “It’s so exciting. It was believed to have been lost.”

“Kubrick aficionados know he wanted to do it, [but] no one ever thought it was completed. We now have a copy and this proves that he had done a full screenplay,” Abrams added. He describes the project as “the inverse of ‘Lolita,
See full article at Indiewire »

Anthony Harvey, Director Of "The Lion In Winter", Dead At 87

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro's Todd Garbarini and Lee Pfeiffer with Anthony Harvey at a screening of The Lion in Winter at the Loew's Jersey City, 2009.

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Anthony Harvey, the actor who became an editor only to finally become an esteemed director, has died at age 87 at his home in Long Island. Harvey was born in London and attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art with the hope of becoming an actor. However, he turned to film editing instead. On a whim he contacted Stanley Kubrick and convinced the director to hire him as editor on the 1962 production of "Lolita".  Kubrick was so impressed that he hired Harvey again to edit his next film "Dr. Strangelove". Harvey's innovative method of fast cutting won plaudits from the industry. At one point, however, disaster nearly struck when footage of a complicated sequence he had edited went missing, leading him to have to recreate
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Other Side of the Booth: A Profile of James B. Harris in Present Day Los Angeles

  • MUBI
Courtesy of James B. HarrisIt’s a Sunday afternoon in Los Angeles and 89-year-old writer/director/producer James B. Harris (Some Call It Loving, 1973; Fast-Walking, 1982) has agreed to meet me for brunch at Coogie’s Cafe. Coogie’s is exactly the sort of unassuming American diner where girls in pink velvet jackets and shimmery silver skirts go to blend in with the Pepto-Bismol-colored booths. There are a pair of flat screen TVs on the wall, which are mercifully muted. A radio in some far-off corner of the kitchen can be heard playing inoffensive pop tunes of yesteryear. It is also the sort of quiet place where someone like Harris is well-known, well-liked, and referred to as “Mr. James” by the entire waitstaff. The impression is one of polite reverence and earned familiarity, built up over time and solidified through an appreciation of his impressive filmography, as well as his continued business.
See full article at MUBI »

Pain Pays the Income of Each Precious Thing: Stanley Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon"

  • MUBI
“For an intellectual product of any value to exert an immediate influence which shall also be deep and lasting, it must rest on an inner harmony, yes, an affinity, between the personal destiny of its author and that of his contemporaries in general.”—Thomas Mann, Death in Venice Barry Lyndon. I can’t believe there was a time when I didn’t know that name. Barry Lyndon means an artwork both grand and glum. Sadness inconsolable. A cello bends out a lurid sound, staining the air before a piano droopingly follows in the third movement of Vivaldi's “Cello Concerto in E Minor.” This piece, which dominates the second half of the film, steers the hallowed half of my head to bask in the film’s high melancholic temperature. Why should I so often remember it? What did I have to do with this film? I only received it with
See full article at MUBI »
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