Billy Budd (1962) - News Poster

(1962)

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Billy Budd

Forget the ‘famous book’ doldrums — this exciting seagoing drama will take your head off. Criminally unseen and unheralded, Allied Artists’ classic is an impressive feat by director-co-screenwriter and star Peter Ustinov. It introduced Terence Stamp and provided Robert Ryan with a deserved career highlight.

Billy Budd

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1962 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 123 min. / Street Date January 3, 2018 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Robert Ryan, Peter Ustinov, Melvyn Douglas, Paul Rogers, John Neville, David McCallum, Ronald Lewis, Robert Brown, John Meillon, Niall MacGinnis, Terence Stamp.

Cinematography: Robert Krasker

Film Editor: Jack Harris

Original Music: Antony Hopkins

Written by Peter Ustinov, DeWitt Bodeen from the play by Louis O. Coxe, Robert H. Chapman from the novel Billy Budd, Foretopman by Herman Melville

Produced by A. Ronald Lubin, Peter Ustinov

Directed by Peter Ustinov

Talk about a book that works like gangbusters… When Warners’ first DVD came out in 2007 I found out
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Bitter Harvest Starring Max Irons and Terence Stamp Arriving on DVD June 13th

Based on true historical events during Stalin’s 1930s campaign against Soviet Ukraine, Bitter Harvestis the powerful story of love, war, and survival, arriving on DVD, On Demand, and Digital HD June 13th from Lionsgate. This action-filled epic follows a young artist as he battles famine, imprisonment, and torture to save his childhood love and free his country. Starring Max Irons, Samantha Barks, Barry Pepper, and Academy Award® nominee Terence Stamp (Best Actor in a Supporting Role, Billy Budd, 1962). Written and directed by George Mendeluk (TV’s “Highlander: The Raven,” “Night Heat”), the Bitter Harvest DVD will be available for the suggested retail price of $19.98.

Set during one of the most overlooked and tragic periods of the 20th century, Bitter Harvest is a powerful story of love, honor, rebellion and survival as seen through the eyes of two young lovers caught in the ravages of Joseph Stalin’s policies of
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Veteran’s Day Tribute: The Ten Best Navy Movies

Veteran’s Day is November 11. While we all try to escape from the most exasperating Presidential Campaign in our history let me pay tribute to the Men and Women who have served in the military to insure we keep our electoral process and our freedoms.

Having served in the Navy four years (there he goes again!) I have a keen interest in any movie about the military, especially the sea service. I did serve during peace time so had no experience with combat but still spent most of my tour of duty at sea on an aircraft carrier, the USS Amerca CV66. Among other jobs I ran the ship’s television station for almost two years. Movies have always been important to me and so providing a few hours of entertainment every day when we were at sea was just about the best job I could have had.

The author
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Weekly Rushes. 6 April 2016

  • MUBI
Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.NEWSThe great French essayist Chris Marker remains on our minds nearly four years after his death—the mystery of his life and his work remains haunting. Which is why we're very intrigued by the news that his adopted daughter has penned a new book about their relationship, Chris Marker (le livre impossible).Okay, Sofia Coppola's A Very Murray Christmas was pretty wretched (though we can't help but love that it was shot in New York's Bemelmans Bar), but we adore Don Siegel's Southern Gothic, Civil War-set, Clint Eastwood-starring kinky horror film (!), The Beguiled—and so are tremendously curious about the news that Coppola will remake that 1971 film with Nicole Kidman.Speaking of films in the works, Terry Gilliam may...finally...start...shooting Don Quixote, produced by Paulo Branco,
See full article at MUBI »

In the Heart of the Sea | Review

Two if by Sea: Howard’s Whaling Expedition Sinks to the Fathoms

Herman Melville’s 1851 novel Moby-Dick is one of the seminal epics of American literature, adapted several times for film and television over the decades, though John Huston’s 1956 film version still stands as the most accomplished cinematic rendering. Director Ron Howard adapts Nathaniel Philbrick’s 2000 novel In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex, a retelling of the aquatic ordeal upon which Melville based his famous text. Suffering from some obnoxious moments of stilted bids at heroic nobility from its central characters and weighted down with considerable cliché, the screenplay, adapted by Charles Leavitt, Rick Jaffa, and Amanda Silver, is a framed narrative that doesn’t seem to have sparked the passion of its adapters. Saddled with a PG-13 rating, which hampers the narrative’s more sensational elements, (such as the depiction
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Terence Stamp: English is a foreign language in London

Icon of swinging 60s complains English speakers can ‘barely get by’ in capital and laments struggle to purchase fruit from East End market stall

The Oscar-nominated actor Terence Stamp has queried the multicultural identity of London and complained that no one speaks English in the capital city.

The 76-year-old star of Superman 2, Billy Budd and The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert told the Daily Mail he now struggled to buy his beloved mangoes from a favourite East End stall because of a language barrier.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Terence Stamp: ‘I was in my prime, but when the 60s ended, I ended with it’

He was the star of some of the decade’s most memorable films – and dated some of its most beautiful women. With the reissue of 1967’s Far From the Madding Crowd, the actor talks about his friendship with Michael Caine and his topsy-turvy career

Terence Stamp sticks his head round the door and opens his mouth. How will this legend of British acting introduce himself? What pearl of wisdom will he divulge? Stamp, self-confessed “decadent” and former holder of the title of world’s best-looking man (1963-1969) speaks: “Gotta take a slash, man. Where’s the gents?” Having been pointed in the right direction, Stamp returns, visibly relieved.

It’s funny how things work out. Now 76, Stamp had a fantastic 1960s, during which he starred in a handful of imperishable classics (Billy Budd, Ken Loach’s Poor Cow, Pasolini’s Theorem) and consorted with some of the era’s most beautiful women (Julie Christie,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Terence Stamp: ‘I was in my prime, but when the 60s ended, I ended with it’

He was the star of some of the decade’s most memorable films – and dated some of its most beautiful women. With the reissue of 1967’s Far From the Madding Crowd, the actor talks about his friendship with Michael Caine and his topsy-turvy career

Terence Stamp sticks his head round the door and opens his mouth. How will this legend of British acting introduce himself? What pearl of wisdom will he divulge? Stamp, self-confessed “decadent” and former holder of the title of world’s best-looking man (1963-1969) speaks: “Gotta take a slash, man. Where’s the gents?” Having been pointed in the right direction, Stamp returns, visibly relieved.

It’s funny how things work out. Now 76, Stamp had a fantastic 1960s, during which he starred in a handful of imperishable classics (Billy Budd, Ken Loach’s Poor Cow, Pasolini’s Theorem) and consorted with some of the era’s most beautiful women (Julie Christie,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

DVD Review: "Dogs" (1976) Starring David McCallum; Special Collector's Edition From Scorpion Entertainment

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

The good folks at Scorpion Entertainment have done it again by producing first rate special collector's DVD and Blu-ray editions of a film that most critics dismissed as second rate at the time of its initial release. In this case, the film is "Dogs", which was unleashed (if you pardon the pun) on theaters in 1976, an era in which audiences went mad for movies about animals waging war on humanity. The modestly-budgeted production was shot in southern California on the outskirts of San Diego, with some key scenes filmed at Southwestern University. Directed by Burt Brinckerhoff, who went on to become a popular director of hit TV series, the film is set in an unnamed college in an unnamed town in an unnamed state. Suffice it to say that the area is fairly rural and the townspeople all seem to have connections to the local university.  A bearded,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Cinema Retro Covers David McCallum At "The Great Escape" 50th Anniversary Screening, Omaha

  • CinemaRetro
David McCallum with event host Bruce Crawford. (Photo: Steve Gray)

By Jon Heitland

On any list of the best films based on World War II, The Great Escape, directed by John Sturges and based on the novel by Paul Brickhill, will always rank near the top. The compelling story of a group of British and American prisoners of war and how they outwitted their Nazi captors observes its 50th anniversary this year, and actor David McCallum, who plays Ashley-Pitt in the film, travelled to Omaha, Nebraska on November 9, 2013, to help celebrate the classic film. Proceeds went to the Nebraska Kidney Foundation, which was why McCallum took time from his busy television schedule to make an appearance. The evening event centered around a showing of the film at the large, concert-style theater at the prestigious Joslyn Museum, to an enthusiastic, full house crowd of 1000.

The Great Escape 50 year retrospective was another
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Paul Rogers obituary

Actor who played many major Shakespearean roles on the stage

Few actors played as many major Shakespearean roles as did Paul Rogers, a largely forgotten and seriously underrated performer, who has died aged 96. It was as though he was barnacled in those parts, undertaken at the Old Vic in the 1950s, by the time he played his most famous role, the vicious paterfamilias Max in Harold Pinter's The Homecoming at the Aldwych theatre in 1965 (and filmed in 1973).

Staunch, stolid and thuggish, with eyes that drilled through any opposition, Rogers's Max was a grumpy old block of granite, hewn on an epic scale, despite the flat cap and plimsolls – horribly real. Peter Hall's production for the Royal Shakespeare Company was monumental; everything was grey, chill and cheerless in John Bury's design, set off firstly by a piquant bowl of green apples and then by the savage acting.

The Homecoming
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Paul Rogers obituary

Actor who played many major Shakespearean roles on the stage

Few actors played as many major Shakespearean roles as did Paul Rogers, a largely forgotten and seriously underrated performer, who has died aged 96. It was as though he was barnacled in those parts, undertaken at the Old Vic in the 1950s, by the time he played his most famous role, the vicious paterfamilias Max in Harold Pinter's The Homecoming at the Aldwych theatre in 1965 (and filmed in 1973).

Staunch, stolid and thuggish, with eyes that drilled through any opposition, Rogers's Max was a grumpy old block of granite, hewn on an epic scale, despite the flat cap and plimsolls – horribly real. Peter Hall's production for the Royal Shakespeare Company was monumental; everything was grey, chill and cheerless in John Bury's design, set off firstly by a piquant bowl of green apples and then by the savage acting.

The Homecoming
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Terence Stamp: The Hollywood Interview

Terence Stamp Finds His Song

By Alex Simon

One of the iconic actors and faces of London’s “swinging” sixties; Terence Stamp was discovered by actor/director Peter Ustinov for the titular role in his adaptation of Melville’s “Billy Budd” in 1962. The Cockney lad from London’s notorious Bow district was thrust into the limelight almost overnight, becoming a symbol of the English working class “intelligentsia,” which helped shape that decade’s pop culture. Along with game-changers like Joe Orton, (Stamp’s former roommate) Michael Caine, and the Beatles, Stamp et al proved to the world that one needn’t have graduated with a First from Oxford to make a mark on the world.

Terence Stamp marked his 50th year in show business with the release of last year’s “Unfinished Song,” being released today on DVD and Amazon Instant Video by Anchor Bay Entertainment. Stamp plays grumpy pensioner Arthur Harris,
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

'Superman' Star On The Movie's 35th Anniversary

'Superman' Star On The Movie's 35th Anniversary
Los Angeles -- Long before the new "Man of Steel," actor Terence Stamp delivered the screen General Zod of a generation. Stamp portrayed Superman's Kryptonian arch enemy opposite Christopher Reeve in "Superman" (1978) and "Superman II" (1980).

"I can't go out on the street in London without somebody saying, "`It's Zod!' It's fun for me," said Stamp in a recent interview, adding he'd yet to see "Man of Steel," which casts Michael Shannon as Zod.

Thirty-five years since "Superman," Stamp returns to cinemas in the dramedy "Unfinished Song," which opens stateside this weekend after an overseas run with an alternate title, "Song for Marion."

Stamp and Vanessa Redgrave play English pensioners Arthur and Marion. He's a codger; she is full of life, but dying. And yet this is no odd couple. They are, instead, something rarely seen in entertainment: earthbound, elderly soul mates. Forget high-flying romance. These two are real.
See full article at Huffington Post »

Giveaway - Win tickets to the Terence Stamp season at BFI Southbank

Acclaimed English actor Terence Stamp will present a selection of his finest films this month at the BFI Southbank with a season co-curated by the man himself, and we're offering two readers the chance to win a pair of tickets to a film of their choosing. Read on for a synopsis, and details of how to enter the giveaway...

Along with the aforementioned Theorem, the season also includes Billy Budd, The Collector, Far from the Madding Crowd, Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut, The Hit, Toby Dammit +Hu-Man, Poor Cow, Prince of Shadows, The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, The Hit, The Limey, Bowfinger, Prince of Shadows and Song for Marion. You can check out a full list of all the screenings and purchase tickets here.

To be in with a chance of winning a pair of tickets, firstly make sure you like us on Facebook (or follow
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

This week's new film events

Terence Stamp | Southend Film Festival | Sci-Fi London | Rooftop Film Club

Terence Stamp, London

His beauty is often admired before his acting skills, but while the former has faded somewhat the latter survives, at least when Stamp isn't topping up the retirement fund with another offhand baddie role. Those dodgier movies have thankfully been omitted from this selective retrospective (don't worry, Superman II is still in there). He lit up the screen, and the 1960s, with early films such as Billy Budd, The Collector, Far From The Madding Crowd, Poor Cow and Theorem, then took an extended break in an Indian ashram. Since his return to the day job, he's reminded us what he can do, in The Hit, The Adventures Of Priscilla Queen Of The Desert, even last year's Song For Marion. He's a terrific writer and talker, too, which should make his on-stage interview (8 May) a hot ticket.

BFI Southbank,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

British Legend Terence Stamp Talks On Becoming An Urban Icon

British actor Terence Stamp is a bit of an institution and with Man Of Steel just around the corner, he has been speaking to Es magazine to discusses his love of fashion, a blind date with Brigitte Bardot and his position as an ‘urban icon’. Stamp’s iconic role as General Zod in Superman and Superman II places him in movie history but that’s just the tip of acting iceberg for this highly experienced man of the big screen.

His debut film appearance in 1962 was in the title role of Billy Budd directed by Peter Ustinov and in that part, he earned himself an Oscar Nomination, not bad for a beginner. From there, Stamp worked all number of highly respected directors and actors, and it’s easy to say that this instantly recognisable man is a remarkable screen presence, every time. Stamp was once also lucky enough to have
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Film Review: 'Theorem' (BFI rerelease)

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ Rereleased in selected UK cinemas this week by the BFI ahead of the second half of their Pier Paolo Pasolini season, the Italian provocateur's 1968 film Theorem (Teorema) sees British actor Terence Stamp (Billy Budd, The Limey) star as a divine young bachelor who enters the lives of a well-to-do Milanese household, only to suddenly leave them in complete disarray. Banned in its native Italy for its overt sexual nature - tame, of course, by today's standards - Theorem remains one of Pasolini's most satisfying works, thanks in no small part to a magnificent supporting cast, including a quite sublime Silvana Mangano. Read more »
See full article at CineVue »

Holy Motors – review

Some may find it deeply irritating, but Leos Carax's dreamlike and richly allusive movie is destined to become a classic

Now 51, the French enfant terrible emeritus Leos Carax is an immensely talented and highly self-conscious filmmaker who has made a mere five features in the past 28 years. His nom de plume (or as he might put it, using a term popular once among the Nouvelle Vague directors he admired, nom de caméra stylo) is an anagram of the first two parts of his real name, Alex Oscar Dupont, and the title of his last film, Pola X, made in 1999, has a similarly solipsistic origin. Pola X is an acronym derived from the French title of Herman Melville's novel Pierre; or, the Ambiguities, which Melville wrote to cope with the failure of Moby-Dick. Carax transposed it from 19th-century New England to late-20th-century France because he saw parallels between
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Great Films Directed by Women Pt. 1

Not too long ago I asked the Sound On Sight staff to choose their ten favourite films of all time. The result led to mixed reactions (both by staff and readers), and some angry feedback. But how could any of us select only ten films from the thousands we’ve seen and walk away happy with the results. The fact is, of all the films which received a vote, it was those more widely available who made the cut. In other words, films such as The Godfather and Pulp Fiction stood a greater chance of receiving more ballots than say, obscure foreign gems.

My biggest disappointment with the picks, although only ten films were spotlighted, was the lack of votes for films directed by women. Could it be that none of us here at Sound On Sight valued great directors such as Claire Denis, Agnès Varda, Chantal Akerman or Lina Wertmüller?
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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