Escape from Fort Bravo (1953) - News Poster

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The Law and Jake Wade

Many of MGM’s productions were scraping bottom in 1958, yet the studio found one more acceptable western vehicle for their last big star still on contract. Only-slightly corrupt marshal Robert Taylor edges toward a showdown with the thoroughly corrupt Richard Widmark in an economy item given impressive locations and the sound direction of John Sturges.

The Law and Jake Wade

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1958 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 86 min. / Street Date September 12, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Robert Taylor, Richard Widmark, Patricia Owens, Robert Middleton, Henry Silva, DeForest Kelley, Henry Silva, Burt Douglas, Eddie Firestone.

Cinematography: Robert Surtees

Film Editor: Ferris Webster

Written by William Bowers from a novel by Marvin H. Albert

Produced by William B. Hawks

Directed by John Sturges

As the 1950s wore down, MGM was finding it more difficult to properly use its last remaining big-ticket stars on the steady payroll, Cyd Charisse and Robert Taylor. Cyd
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Sopranos Actress Bergen, the Movies' '1st Female President' of the United States, Dead at 84

Sopranos Actress Bergen, the Movies' '1st Female President' of the United States, Dead at 84
Polly Bergen dead at 84: ‘First woman president of the U.S.A.,’ former mistress of Tony Soprano’s father Emmy Award-winning actress Polly Bergen — whose roles ranged from the first U.S.A. woman president in Kisses for My President to the former mistress of both Tony Soprano’s father and John F. Kennedy in the television hit series The Sopranos — died from "natural causes" on September 20, 2014, at her home in Southbury, Connecticut. The 84-year-old Bergen, a heavy smoker for five decades, had been suffering from emphysema and other ailments since the 1990s. "Most people think I was born in a rich Long Island family," she told The Washington Post in 1988, but Polly Bergen was actually born Nellie Paulina Burgin on July 14, 1930, to an impoverished family in Knoxville, Tennessee. Her father was an illiterate construction worker while her mother got only as far as the third grade. The family
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Eleanor Parker obituary

Versatile actor best known for her roles in The Sound of Music and Of Human Bondage

In the Hollywood of the 1940s and 50s, when typecasting was an essential constituent of stardom, Eleanor Parker, who has died aged 91, never gained the recognition she deserved, because she refused to be pigeonholed. "It means I've been successful in creating the characters that I've portrayed – that I'm not just a personality who is seen in a variety of roles." Dana Andrews, her co-star in Madison Avenue (1962), called her "the least heralded great actress".

The 1957 film Lizzie is almost a reflection of her career. Parker plays three separate and distinct characters harboured inside one woman – the shy, self-effacing Elizabeth; the wanton, raunchy Lizzie; and the "normal" Beth – and switches brilliantly from one to the other. Parker was always able to be convincing in these three sorts of characters. She was naive as the girl
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Eleanor Parker obituary

Versatile actor best known for her roles in The Sound of Music and Of Human Bondage

In the Hollywood of the 1940s and 50s, when typecasting was an essential constituent of stardom, Eleanor Parker, who has died aged 91, never gained the recognition she deserved, because she refused to be pigeonholed. "It means I've been successful in creating the characters that I've portrayed – that I'm not just a personality who is seen in a variety of roles." Dana Andrews, her co-star in Madison Avenue (1962), called her "the least heralded great actress".

The 1957 film Lizzie is almost a reflection of her career. Parker plays three separate and distinct characters harboured inside one woman – the shy, self-effacing Elizabeth; the wanton, raunchy Lizzie; and the "normal" Beth – and switches brilliantly from one to the other. Parker was always able to be convincing in these three sorts of characters. She was naive as the girl
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Eleanor Parker, 'The Sound Of Music' Actress, Dies At 91

Eleanor Parker, the 3-time Academy Award nominated actress who played the baroness in The Sound of Music, died on Monday. She was 91.

Eleanor Parker Dies

Parker’s death was announced by family friend Richard Gale, who said that the actress died from complications stemming from a bout of pneumonia. She passed away at a Palm Springs medical facility, surrounded by her children.

The 1950s were Parker’s heyday in Hollywood, in which she received Oscar nods for Caged (1950), Detective Story (1951) and Interrupted Melody (1955). During the decade, she also appeared in Escape from Fort Bravo, Valley of the Kings, The Man with the Golden Arm and A Hole in the Head.

To modern audiences, Parker is best known for playing The Baroness in The Sound of Music, who tries futilely to woo Christopher Plummer’s Captain Von Trapp – who ends up smitten with Julie Andrew’s Maria. Upon leaning of Parker’s death,
See full article at Uinterview »

Eleanor Parker, 'Sound of Music' Actress, Dead at 91

  • Moviefone
Jessica Herndon, AP Film Writer

Los Angeles (AP) - Eleanor Parker, who was nominated for Academy Awards three times for her portrayals of strong-willed women and played a scheming baroness in "The Sound of Music," has died at 91.

Family friend Richard Gale said Parker died Monday morning due to complications from pneumonia. "She passed away peacefully, surrounded by her children at a medical facility near her home in Palm Springs," Gale added.

Parker was nominated for Oscars in 1950, 1951 and 1955, but then saw her career begin to wane in the early 1960s. Her last memorable role came in 1965's "The Sound of Music," in which she played the scheming baroness who loses Christopher Plummer to Julie Andrews.

"Eleanor Parker was and is one of the most beautiful ladies I have ever known," said Plummer in a statement. "Both as a person and as a beauty. I hardly believe the sad news
See full article at Moviefone »

Making Of The West: Mythmakers and truth-tellers

The “adult” Western – as it would come to be called – was a long time coming. A Hollywood staple since the days of The Great Train Robbery (1903), the Western offered spectacle and action set against the uniquely American milieu of the Old West – a historical period which, at the dawn of the motion picture industry, was still fresh in the nation’s memory. What the genre rarely offered was dramatic substance.

Early Westerns often adopted the same traditions of the popular Wild West literature and dime novels of the 19th and early 20th centuries producing, as a consequence, highly romantic, almost purely mythic portraits the Old West. Through the early decades of the motion picture industry, the genre went through several creative cycles, alternately tilting from fanciful to realistic and back again. By the early sound era, and despite such serious efforts as The Big Trail (1930) and The Virginian (1929), Hollywood Westerns were,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Nine Overlooked Classic Westerns

The Western was a movie staple for decades. It seemed the genre that would never die, feeding the fantasies of one generation after another of young boys who galloped around their backyards, playgrounds, and brick streets on broomsticks, banging away with their Mattel cap pistols. Something about a man on a horse set against the boundless wastes of Monument Valley, the crackle of saddle leather, two men facing off in a dusty street under the noon sun connected with the free spirit in every kid.

The American movie – a celluloid telling that was more than a skit – was born in a Western: Edwin S. Porter’s 11- minute The Great Train Robbery (1903). Thereafter, Westerns grew longer, they grew more complex. The West – hostile, endless, civilization barely maintaining a toehold against the elements, hostile natives, and robber barons – proved an infinitely plastic setting. In a place with no law, and where
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Matt Smith's Wild West adventure

Matt Smith says that he felt like Clint Eastwood filming the upcoming 'Doctor Who' episode. The actor, who plays the Doctor, filmed this weekend's (15.09.12) episode, 'A Town Called Mercy', on the edge of Spain's Tabernas desert in Fort Bravo and enjoyed the change of scenery as it reminded him of the Wild West. He told the Radio Times: ''I love westerns and when you look at the history, this is where they were all made. ''I rode my horse up the main street in the town yesterday and felt like Clint Eastwood.'' The dust streets and wooden buildings have played host to
See full article at Virgin Media - TV »

Gok Wan: I always like a new challenge

Matt Smith says that he felt like Clint Eastwood filming the upcoming 'Doctor Who' episode. The actor, who plays the Doctor, filmed this weekend's (15.09.12) episode, 'A Town Called Mercy', on the edge of Spain's Tabernas desert in Fort Bravo and enjoyed the change of scenery as it reminded him of the Wild West. He told the Radio Times: ''I love westerns and when you look at the history, this is where they were all made. ''I rode my horse up the main street in the town yesterday and felt like Clint Eastwood.'' The dust streets and wooden buildings have played host to
See full article at Virgin Media - TV »

Memento Mori: Remembering those we lost in 2011

In October of 2010, Sound on Sight asked me to do my first commemorative piece on the passing of filmmaker Arthur Penn. I suspect I was asked because I was the only one writing for the site old enough to have seen Penn’s films in theaters. Whatever the reason, it was an unexpectedly rewarding if expectedly bittersweet experience which led to a series of equally rewarding but bittersweet experiences writing on the passing of other filmdom notables.

I say rewarding because it gave me a nostalgic-flavored chance to revisit certain work and the people behind it; a revisiting which often brought back the nearly-forgotten youthful excitement that went with an eye-opening, a discovery, the thrill of the new. Writing them has also been bittersweet because each of these pieces is a formal acknowledgment that something precious is gone. A talent may be perhaps preserved forever on celluloid, but the filmography
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Sos Staff Gateway Films: Bill Mesce – ‘The Magnificent Seven’

There was no a-ha! moment, no seeing of the light, no epiphany. I’d loved movies since I was a kid, had been a buff since my early teens, but there was no one, shining instance of enlightenment where my relationship with film graduated to something — … Well, the kind of thing my Sound on Sight colleagues have been talking about this month with their “gateway” films. Instead, it was a cumulative experience for me; my road to that point was a long, winding, gradual one. Here and there along that road something would lodge in the ol’ gray matter, tickle at some deep place, until enough of those somethings gathered up over the years finally coalesced into a critical mass.

But I can tell you where that first turn in that road was; that first stop where I picked up that first something. I was six years old, it was
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Worth Remembering:  William Holden (1918-1981) and Glenn Ford (1916-2006) – Golden Boys

By most accounts, Harry Cohn was a royal son of a bitch.

For the uninformed, Harry Cohn was co-founder of Columbia Pictures, and the autocratic ruler of the studio from its founding in 1919 until his death in 1958. He was vulgar, crass, tyrannical, a screaming, foul-mouthed verbal bully i.e. a royal son of a bitch.

He was also a cheap son of a bitch.

Originally considered a “Poverty Row” studio, Cohn’s Columbia – at least at first – refused to build a roster of salaried stars as the other studios did. Cohn didn’t want the overhead or the headaches he saw saddling other studio chiefs with their contract talent. Cheaper and easier was to pay those studios a flat fee for the one-time use of their marquee value stars to give Columbia’s B-budgeted flicks an A-list shine. Columbia was considered such a nickel-and-dime outfit at the time that other
See full article at SoundOnSight »

William Campbell obituary

American actor known for his roles in horror films and Star Trek

The actor William Campbell, who has died aged 87, had a long and varied career in films and on television, finding recognition from his association with several low-budget horror pictures and with the TV sci-fi series Star Trek. However, although he had the hooded eyes and languid manner of Robert Mitchum and something of the laid-back anarchism of Jack Nicholson, entry into the major league of stardom eluded him.

Campbell was in the first series of Star Trek, in an episode entitled The Squire of Gothos (1967), in which he has a field day as General Trelane, a foppish, childish humanoid, swinging wildly from joviality to sulkiness to anger. In The Trouble With Tribbles (1967), in the second season, Campbell was equally impressive as Koloth, a bearded, bureaucratic Klingon, a character that he revived 27 years later, towards the end of his working life,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

William Campbell obituary

American actor known for his roles in horror films and Star Trek

The actor William Campbell, who has died aged 87, had a long and varied career in films and on television, finding recognition from his association with several low-budget horror pictures and with the TV sci-fi series Star Trek. However, although he had the hooded eyes and languid manner of Robert Mitchum and something of the laid-back anarchism of Jack Nicholson, entry into the major league of stardom eluded him.

Campbell was in the first series of Star Trek, in an episode entitled The Squire of Gothos (1967), in which he has a field day as General Trelane, a foppish, childish humanoid, swinging wildly from joviality to sulkiness to anger. In The Trouble With Tribbles (1967), in the second season, Campbell was equally impressive as Koloth, a bearded, bureaucratic Klingon, a character that he revived 27 years later, towards the end of his working life,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

John Forsythe obituary

American TV actor famous for his role as Dynasty's Blake Carrington and being the voice of Charlie in Charlie's Angels

If the name of the American actor John Forsythe, who has died aged 92, is not immediately recognisable, then that of his character Blake Carrington – the tanned and handsome silver-haired billionaire oil magnate in the long-running television series Dynasty – certainly is. The show, known for its opulent atmosphere, lavish sets and costumes, and preoccupation with the problems of the wealthy, ran alongside Ronald Reagan's years as Us president, 1981-89. It made Forsythe internationally famous and rich. During the second year of the run, Forsythe remarked: "I can't afford to bulge. Being a 64-year-old sex symbol is a hell of a weight to carry."

With his earnest demeanour, Forsythe, as the patriarch plagued by a scheming ex-wife (Joan Collins), a bisexual son, and other tribulations ranging from murder and greed to lust and incest,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

John Forsythe obituary

American TV actor famous for his role as Dynasty's Blake Carrington and being the voice of Charlie in Charlie's Angels

If the name of the American actor John Forsythe, who has died aged 92, is not immediately recognisable, then that of his character Blake Carrington – the tanned and handsome silver-haired billionaire oil magnate in the long-running television series Dynasty – certainly is. The show, known for its opulent atmosphere, lavish sets and costumes, and preoccupation with the problems of the wealthy, ran alongside Ronald Reagan's years as Us president, 1981-89. It made Forsythe internationally famous and rich. During the second year of the run, Forsythe remarked: "I can't afford to bulge. Being a 64-year-old sex symbol is a hell of a weight to carry."

With his earnest demeanour, Forsythe, as the patriarch plagued by a scheming ex-wife (Joan Collins), a bisexual son, and other tribulations ranging from murder and greed to lust and incest,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

John Forsythe Passes Away at 92

John Forsythe Dies at 92 John Forsythe, the handsome, smooth-voiced actor who made his fortune as the scheming oil tycoon in TV's Dynasty and the voice of the leader of Charlie's Angels has died after a yearlong battle with cancer. He was 92.

Forsythe died late Thursday at his home in Santa Ynez from complications of pneumonia, publicist Harlan Boll said Friday.

"He died as he lived his life, with dignity and grace," daughter Brooke Forsythe said.

Despite his distinguished work in theater and films, Forsythe's greatest fame came from his role as Blake Carrington in the 1981-89 primetime soap opera Dynasty. Forsythe lent dignity to the tale of murder, deceit, adultery and high finance, which often brought Carrington into conflict with his flashy, vengeful former wife, Alexis Colby, played to the hilt by Joan Collins.

Collins released the following statement through her spokesmen Andrew Freedman:

"He was one of the
See full article at MovieWeb »

R.I.P. John Forsythe (1918-2010)

Actor John Forsythe has passed away yesterday April 1st from pneumonia after a long battle with cancer. He was 92 years old. Forsythe began his career in the early 1940s working as a bit player for Warner Bros. before military service in World War II. After the war he joined the prestigious Actors Studio, which led to a number of Broadway roles and parts in films such as Escape From Fort Bravo (1953) and Alfred Hitchcock's The Trouble With Harry (1955).

Forsythe would go on to star in a number of features including In Cold Blood (1967), Topaz (1969), and Scrooged (1988), although he was best known for his work on the small screen. He took the lead in the sitcom Bachelor Father (1957-1962) and provided the voice of millionaire Charles Townsend in Charlie's Angels (1976-1981), a role he reprised for McG's big-screen adaptations in 2000 and 2003. Forsythe would also gain acclaim as ruthless oil
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

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