Edit
No Highway in the Sky (1951) Poster

Trivia

The concept of an airliner suffering catastrophic failure due to metal fatigue after a certain number of flight cycles, as outlined in the 1948 novel and this 1951 film, came true with the failures of the de Havilland Comet in 1954. There are a number of eerie parallels between the fictional account and the later actual events.
24 of 25 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Dietrich chose her wardrobe from the newest Christian Dior collection and charged it to the studio. She decided that the fur stole they had wasn't ample enough for her character so she threw on a mink cape and used the stole as a collar piece to get the luxurious look she wanted.
12 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
James Stewart worked alongside Fred Jones, a scientist (Boffin) from R.A.E Farnborough to get into character. Fred Jones was the lead wreckage analyst on the true life Comet disaster, mirroring the film.
16 of 17 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
It is particularly notable that the Reindeer aircraft has square windows. The Comet 1 jetliner which had a number of disastrous crashes a few years later, did so due to metal fatigue caused by stress around its square windows. Later models of the Comet had oval windows.
14 of 17 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on April 28, 1952 with James Stewart and Marlene Dietrich reprising their film roles.
10 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The single-engine jet fighter seen in the film is a rare Gloster E.1/44 prototype, first flown in 1948. Three were produced for testing. One was destroyed in a ground transportation accident. The other two were scrapped after the program was canceled in 1951, shortly after this film was made.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
At the beginning of the film, Scott looks up to see a twin-tailed jet fly over. That plane is a De Havilland FB Mk I "Venom". First flown in 1949, the plane had not yet entered service at the time of this film's production - a rare look at the first production model of the Venom undergoing testing.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The part of Theodore Honey was originally intended for Robert Donat (the character in the original novel is an Englishman). Donat's lifelong and severe asthmatic condition forced him to drop out at the last moment, something which happened repeatedly in his career. James Stewart took the part over and the character was converted into an American who had come to England on a Rhodes scholarship and stayed.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
According to Kenneth More's autobiography, Marlene Dietrich had several of her lines rewritten by Noël Coward, who went uncredited for his work.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Scott's car, first seen when he gives Henry a lift at the beginning of the film, is a 1948 Riley 2.5L RMB. Only 6,900 were made from 1946 to 1952. List price was £1,224. Despite the low production and its being a larger "executive" car, in excellent condition at auction in 2017 it could fetch only $15,000 (£11,000) in 2017.
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The plane used for the "Rutland Reindeer" is actually a heavily modified Handley Page HP-70 Halifax. In the film it has the fake registration G-AFOH. Its real registration was G-AJNW. This was a C.VIII version used for cargo and passenger transport. It flew 116 missions during the Berlin Airlift. After its numerous modifications for this film, it was unflyable and was scrapped after production was finished.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Honey is shown returning to England on a RAF Avro Lancaster B Mk VII, no. NX636. This aircraft was assigned to the RAE at Farnborough at the time of this film.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This film is the second pairing of Niall MacGinnis (pilot) and Glynis Johns (stewardess). The first pairing was 10 years earlier in the 1941 film 49th Parallel (1941).
2 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page


Recently Viewed