The Third Man (1949) - News Poster

(1949)

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‘The Whistlers’ Director on How a Documentary and a Lot of Classic Noir Films Inspired His New Comedy

  • The Wrap
‘The Whistlers’ Director on How a Documentary and a Lot of Classic Noir Films Inspired His New Comedy
A version of this story about “The Whistlers” first appeared in the International Film issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine.

Director Corneliu Porumboiu was a central member of the influential New Romanian Cinema, which has shockingly been completely ignored by Oscar voters. His new film, “The Whistlers,” is his second to represent that country in the Oscar race after his deadpan, talky 2009 film “Police, Adjective.” Porumboiu discussed his new movie, a wry film noir about a detective on one of the Canary Islands, where the residents have perfected a language that consists entirely of whistling.

I know this film was inspired when you saw something on TV about the whistling language on the island of La Gomera, but how did you get from that to this particular story?

It took 10 years. It was TV reportage about the island, and at one point they showed something about the whistling language. I got interested right away.
See full article at The Wrap »

Studiocanal 4K Re-Releases In 2020 To Include ‘Breathless’, ‘The Elephant Man’, ‘Basic Instinct’, ‘Total Recall’ & ‘Flash Gordon’

  • Deadline
Studiocanal’s 4K re-releases in 2020 will include classics such as Breathless, The Elephant Man, Basic Instinct, Total Recall, Serpico and Flash Gordon.

Jean-Luc Godard’s New Wave classic Breathless will be 60 next year and Serpico will be re-issued in the same year that its star Al Pacino turns 80. Euro major Studiocanal will also be releasing restored versions of Gaspar Noé’s Irreversible as well as movies such as The Red Circle, The Three Days Of The Condor, Fellini’s Lo Sceicco Blanco, The Ladykillers and horror film Dead Of Night, which Martin Scorsese recently listed as one of the scariest films of all time.

The library titles will get home entertainment releases in multiple Studiocanal territories and some will have theatrical play. David Lynch’s drama The Elephant Man received its premiere at the London Film Festival in October, and will have a
See full article at Deadline »

The Man Between

Critics compare this sophisticated spy thriller to Carol Reed’s earlier Triumph set in Vienna with Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles — but it’s a different story altogether, not about black-market evil but the perils of moral compromise in a divided Berlin. James Mason and Claire Bloom are stunningly good together, in a moody suspense that’s completely serious — no comic relief or ‘fun’ jeopardy to distract from the fascinating, you-are-there setting, a Berlin trying to rebuild itself. With Hildegard Knef, and an extended, beautifully filmed nighttime chase that seals an unlikely romance.

The Man Between

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1953 / B&w / 1:37 flat Academy / 102 min. / Street Date November 5, 2019 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: James Mason, Claire Bloom, Hildegard Knef, Geoffrey Toone, Aribert Wäscher, Ernst Schróder, Dieter Krause, Hilde Sessak, Karl John, Ljuba Welitsch, Reinhard Kolldehoff.

Cinematography: Desmond Dickinson

Film Editor: Bert Bates

Original Music: John Addison

Written by Harry Kurnitz,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Win A ‘The Third Man’ 70th Anniversary Poster & British Film Classics Blu-ray Bundle

The Third Man, Carol Reed’s film noir masterpiece returns to cinemas to celebrate its 70th Anniversary for a one-day special UK-wide release on Sunday 29Th September.

To celebrate this special cinema release, we are offering one lucky winner the chance to take home three British classics on Blu-ray: Brighton Rock, The Fallen Idol and Kind Hearts And Coronets. The winner will also take home a brand-new The Third Man poster (designed specially for this 70th anniversary release).

The Third Man stars Joseph Cotten (Citizen Kane) as Holly Martins, a naïve writer of pulp westerns, who arrives in a bombed-out, post-war Vienna to meet his childhood friend Harry Lime (Orson Welles), only to find that Lime has apparently been killed in a suspicious accident. Martins, too curious for his own good, hears contradictory stories about the circumstances of Lime’s death, and as witnesses begin to disappear he soon finds himself chased by unknown assailants.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Why The Third Man is an essential primer for no-deal Brexit

As the classic noir gets a 70th anniversary re-release, it’s hard to ignore the parallels between a shattered postwar Vienna teeming with spivs and the future the Brexiters have in mind

What perfect timing for The Third Man to step back out of the shadows. Often hailed as the finest film Britain ever made, a 70th anniversary re-release will see it return to cinemas with the government much in the market for symbols of national grandeur. While Boris Johnson has named his favourite film as Dodgeball – for once, eerily believable – as the great British breakdown goes on it is easy to imagine him waving a tiny Union Jack at Carol Reed’s majestic noir.

It is true, of course, that there could be no better moment for The Third Man to reappear – just not as a cosy patriotic treat. Rather, it is a cold premonition of no-deal Britain.

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Third Man: behind the scenes of the film noir masterpiece – in pictures

The Third Man is regarded as one of the greatest British films ever. Written by Graham Greene, directed by Carol Reed, starring Orson Welles and shot in Vienna, it summed up perfectly the downbeat postwar mood. These images, released for its 70th anniversary, show cast and crew on set and in the Vienna streets.

The Third Man is screening at BFI Southbank in London, 6-12 September, followed by a one day nationwide release on 29 September.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Forgotten: This Is a Raid!

  • MUBI
Razzia is a rather snazzy German police thriller from the post-war years, covering comparable territory to Billy Wilder's A Foreign Affair and Carol Reed's The Third Man: it deals with the then-current European crime wave known as the black market.The director Werner Klingler's career might well repay study, as it leaps around so oddly. In 1929 he was in America and acted in Von Sternberg's Viennese-set melodrama The Case of Lena Smith, now seemingly a lost film apart from one ten-minute fragment. He also played Germans for James Whale in Journey's End and Hell's Angels. Returning to Germany he became an assistant director (S.O.S. Iceberg) and then a director, mainly of lightweight thrillers, passing from the Hitler era through to the post-war denazification seemingly without a hitch.Klingler would make Eddie Constantine vehicles and a Mabuse sequel (when the once-feared embodiment of the zeitgeist
See full article at MUBI »

Film Classic ‘The Third Man’ To Get 70th Anniversary Re-Release

The classic movie The Third Man, widely considered to be one of the best films ever made, is getting a 4K restoration re-release to celebrate its 70th anniversary.

Carol Reed’s film noir masterpiece will return to cinemas this Autumn to celebrate its 70th anniversary, in stunning 4K, and a brand new trailer and poster have been released in conjunction with the exciting announcement.

The Third Man stars Joseph Cotten (Citizen Kane) as Holly Martins, a naïve writer of pulp westerns, who arrives in a bombed-out, post-war Vienna to meet his childhood friend Harry Lime (Orson Welles), only to find that Lime has apparently been killed in a suspicious accident. Martins, too curious for his own good, hears contradictory stories about the circumstances of Lime’s death, and as witnesses begin to disappear he soon finds himself chased by unknown assailants. Complicating matters are the sardonic Major Calloway, head of the British forces,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

New Trailer for 70th Anniversary Re-Release of Reed's 'The Third Man'

"You never should've gone to the police, you know." Studiocanal UK has debuted a brand new trailer for the 70th anniversary re-release of the film noir classic The Third Man. Directed by Carol Reed from an original script by Graham Greene, and first released in 1949, this film has gone on to become known as one of the most iconic mystery thrillers ever made. In the film, Pulp novelist Holly Martins travels to shadowy, postwar Vienna, only to find himself investigating the mysterious death of an old friend, Harry Lime. Orson Welles stars as Harry Lime, with Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli, Trevor Howard, Bernard Lee, Paul Hörbiger, and Ernst Deutsch. The B&w film is getting re-released in UK cinemas this September, but we haven't heard about anything in the Us yet (check Fathom Events). We also featured a new trailer for the 4K re-release of The Third Man a few years ago.
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

The Third Man to receive 4K theatrical release for 70th anniversary

Carol Reed’s classic British film noir masterpiece The Third Man is returning to the big screen this September in glorious 4K in celebration of its 70th anniversary, with a special screening and Q&a on September 1st (70 years to the day of its World Premiere) at Picturehouse Central, London, followed by a theatrical release across the UK for one day only on September 29th.

Watch the new trailer for the 4K release here…

The Third Man stars Joseph Cotten (Citizen Kane) as Holly Martins, a naïve writer of pulp westerns, who arrives in a bombed-out, post-war Vienna to meet his childhood friend Harry Lime (Orson Welles), only to find that Lime has apparently been killed in a suspicious accident. Martins, too curious for his own good, hears contradictory stories about the circumstances of Lime’s death, and as witnesses begin to disappear he soon finds himself chased by unknown assailants.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Marc Maron Explains Why You Can’t Use Slurs in Standup and How He Became a Movie Buff

Marc Maron Explains Why You Can’t Use Slurs in Standup and How He Became a Movie Buff
Marc Maron keeps cranking out his podcast, “Wtf With Marc Maron,” but there’s a lot more to him than his comedic interviews. While he continues performing standup, Maron’s acting career continues to evolve. In Lynn Shelton’s newly released “Sword of Trust,” Maron plays a downbeat pawn broker who gets involved in a peculiar scene with a group of southern conspiracy theorists. The collaboration with the improv-friendly Shelton has given Maron one of his finest roles to date, following up on his acclaimed supporting turn on Netflix’s “Glow.”

However, Maron’s affinity for movies predates his own involvement with them. In a recent conversation at the Ludlow Hotel in New York, he spoke about the evolution of sensibilities, as well as the way the changing cultural climate impacted his relationship to political correctness.

How comfortable are you with improvisation?

I’m a stand-up guy, but almost all
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Carol Reed's "Odd Man Out" (1947) Starring James Mason; Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“A Pint Of British Noir”

By Raymond Benson

Film noir wasn’t just relegated to American Hollywood films of the forties and fifties. It was something of an international movement, albeit an unconscious one, for it wasn’t until the late fifties that some critics in France looked back at the past two decades of crime pictures and proclaimed, “Oui! Film noir!”

Britain was doing it, too. Carol Reed’s 1947 Ira-thriller-that-isn’t-an-ira-thriller Odd Man Out is one of the best examples of the style. Robert Krasker’s black and white cinematography pulls in all the essential film noir elements—German expressionism, high contrasts between dark and light, and tons of shadows. Other noir trappings are present, such as stormy weather, night scenes, exterior locations, bars, shabby tenements, a lot of smoking, and a crime. And, for a movie to be “pure noir,” there must not be a happy ending. Odd
See full article at CinemaRetro »

BFI Launches Brit Classics Svod Service In U.S. Marking First Overseas Streaming Offer

  • Deadline
The UK’s leading organization for film, the BFI, has launched its first overseas streaming service in the U.S.

BFI Player Classics, a version of which is already available in the UK, will showcase Brit classics such as The Third Man, Brighton Rock, The Wicker Man and The Man Who Fell to Earth on The Roku Channel. The offering launches with approximately 140 British or British co-production films, picked by BFI experts.

Among the prestige filmmakers with films on the service are Alfred Hitchcock, John Schlesinger, Ken Russell, Lindsay Anderson, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, Nicolas Roeg, Ridley Scott, Sally Potter and Terence Davies. The launch programme includes films from distributors BFI, Lionsgate and Studiocanal.

Customers will have access to a seven-day free trial, after which it will automatically turn into a paid subscription for $5.99/month. After the initial launch phase, the BFI says it will look to work with more U.
See full article at Deadline »

'Third Man,' 'Brighton Rock' Heading to U.S. Via New BFI Streaming Service

'Third Man,' 'Brighton Rock' Heading to U.S. Via New BFI Streaming Service
Classic and cult British films including Brighton Rock, The Third Man, The Wicker Man and The Man Who Fell to Earth are heading to the U.S. on a new streaming service from the British Film Institute.

BFI Player Classics — the first Svod service to launch internationally by the BFI — is now available on the Roku Channel.

Distinct from BFI Player’s U.K. offering, BFI Player Classics launches with a collection of approximately 140 British or U.K. co-produced films, picked by BFI experts. Among the prestige filmmakers showcased are Alfred Hitchcock, John Schlesinger, Ken Russell, Lindsay Anderson, Michael Powell ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

The 15 Best Movie Cameos Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday.

“Always Be My Baby” is now streaming on Netflix, and some of the excitement around the film has centered on a (very funny) cameo by Keanu Reeves as the very aggressive new boyfriend of Ali Wong’s character.

But cameos are not, of course, a new invention of the streaming age. On the contrary, the cameo is an ancient art that stretches all the way back to the time Kurt Vonnegut wrote a bad essay about his own work in “Back to School,” and possibly even before that!

With that in mind, we asked our panel of critics to name their favorite movie cameos ever. Check out their choices below:

Ken Bakely (@kbake_99), Freelance for Film Pulse



I’ve recently been oddly fascinated by Huey Lewis’s brief cameo in “Back to the Future,
See full article at Indiewire »

Laurence Harvey in The Running Man Available on Blu-ray June 18th From Arrow Academy

Laurence Harvey in The Running Man (1963) will be available on Blu-ray June 18th From Arrow Academy

Over a decade after redefining the thriller with The Third Man, director Carol Reed returned to the genre with The Running Man. Reuniting with that film s cinematographer Robert Krasker (BAFTA-nominated for his work here), Reed goes in the opposite direction visually, framing the twisty plot in sun-kissed widescreen color.

Rex Black has successfully faked his death in a plane crash and escaped to sunny Málaga under a new identity, waiting for his wife Stella to arrive with £50,000 of life insurance money. It s the start of a blissful, trouble-free new life for the couple until Stephen, the insurance agent in charge of investigating Rex s death, suddenly arrives in town. Is he just holidaying in Spain, as he claims, or is he on assignment to foil Rex s scheme?

Adapted by John Mortimer
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Orson Welles movies: All 13 films as a director, ranked worst to best, include ‘Citizen Kane,’ ‘Touch of Evil,’ ‘The Magnificent Ambersons’

  • Gold Derby
Orson Welles movies: All 13 films as a director, ranked worst to best, include ‘Citizen Kane,’ ‘Touch of Evil,’ ‘The Magnificent Ambersons’
Orson Welles would’ve celebrated his 104th birthday on May 6, 2019. After making what many people cite as the greatest film ever made, “Citizen Kane” (1941), the multi-talented actor, writer, director and producer struggled to live up to the success he achieved when he was just 26 years old. Yet seen today, many of the films he made afterwards have attained a similar acclaim. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 13 of his completed feature films as a director, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1915, Welles first came to prominence as a stage director, mounting groundbreaking productions of “Macbeth,” “Dr. Faustus,” and “The Cradle Will Rock” before forming his own repertory company, The Mercury Theater. In addition to Welles, the Mercury Theater Players included Joseph Cotten, Ray Collins, Agnes Moorhead, Everett Sloane, George Coulouris, Norman Lloyd, Martin Gabel and Paul Stewart, many of whom would go onto
See full article at Gold Derby »

Orson Welles movies: All 13 films as a director ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Orson Welles movies: All 13 films as a director ranked worst to best
Orson Welles would’ve celebrated his 104th birthday on May 6, 2019. After making what many people cite as the greatest film ever made, “Citizen Kane” (1941), the multi-talented actor, writer, director and producer struggled to live up to the success he achieved when he was just 26 years old. Yet seen today, many of the films he made afterwards have attained a similar acclaim. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 13 of his completed feature films as a director, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1915, Welles first came to prominence as a stage director, mounting groundbreaking productions of “Macbeth,” “Dr. Faustus,” and “The Cradle Will Rock” before forming his own repertory company, The Mercury Theater. In addition to Welles, the Mercury Theater Players included Joseph Cotten, Ray Collins, Agnes Moorhead, Everett Sloane, George Coulouris, Norman Lloyd, Martin Gabel and Paul Stewart, many of whom would go onto
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Odette’ (1950) To Receive Special Edition Home Release

Studiocanal has been in touch this morning to let us know that they plan to release the 1950 classic Odette on DVD and Blu-ray in the coming weeks.

Released to coincide with the 75th Anniversary of D-Day on June 6, director Herbert Wilcox’s (Sixty Glorious Years, Spring in Park Lane) moving story based on true events was originally released in 1950 and will be available to own on DVD, Digital Download and, for the very first time, on Blu-Ray looking better than ever as part of the Vintage Classics collection.

Studiocanal

Starring Anna Neagle, Trevor Howard, Peter Ustinov and Marius Goring, the new release comes complete with brand new extras material including an exclusive interview with author Sebastian Faulks. The new digital restoration has been completed from a new 4k 16bit scan of the original 35mm negative.

Odette is the inspiring true story of a French-born heroine, Odette Sansom (Anna Neagle) who
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Nadja Regin, ‘From Russia With Love’ and ‘Goldfinger’ Actress, Dies at 87

Nadja Regin, ‘From Russia With Love’ and ‘Goldfinger’ Actress, Dies at 87
Nadja Regin, an actress who starred in two James Bond films opposite Sean Connery, has died. She was 87.

Regin’s death was confirmed on Twitter by the official James Bond Twitter account, though no cause of death was given.

“Our thoughts are with her family and friends at this sad time,” @007 account wrote.

Regin, who was born Nadezda Poderegin in Serbia, starred in 1963’s “From Russia With Love” and in 1964’s “Goldfinger” as the character “Bonita” in the film’s opening sequence. And before that, she was the mistress to the MI6 station boss in “From Russia With Love.” She got her start acting at home and in Germany before moving to the UK in the mid-1950s.

Also Read: The Next James Bond? Chris Hemsworth Already Has an 'Audition Tape' to Play 007

Some of her other acting credits included “Runaway Killer,” “Downfall,” “Danger Man,” “The Saint” and the 1965 TV adaptation of “The Third Man.
See full article at The Wrap »
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