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New to Streaming: Christian Petzold, ‘Vox Lux,’ ‘Wanda,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’re highlighting the noteworthy titles that have recently hit platforms. Check out this week’s selections below and an archive of past round-ups here.

Jupiter’s Moon (Kornél Mundruczó)

The juxtaposition of supernatural thriller tropes and urgent socio-political issues in Kornél Mundruczó’s latest movie — an original take on the superhero origin story set to the backdrop of the refugee crisis — might prove a delicate one for some viewers to take. Those unperturbed, however, should find much to relish in Jupiter’s Moon, a film that somewhat lightly plays with themes of religion and immigration as it rumbles, crashes, and ultimately soars through the streets of the Hungarian capital. It’s a tricky balance and Mundruczó (who had a break-out with his canine revolt film White God in 2014) strikes it with style and confidence.
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Fistful of Dirt’ Review: An Original Fantasy Set in the Destruction of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico — Telluride

‘Fistful of Dirt’ Review: An Original Fantasy Set in the Destruction of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico — Telluride
For the first 20-odd minutes, “Fistful of Dirt” is a fascinating neorealist exercise, the story of a young boy set against the backdrop of Hurricane Maria’s aftermath in Puerto Rico in 2017. Then it becomes a mermaid movie, taking an ambitious leap that’s impressive even if it doesn’t always gel. As Sebastian Silva wrestles with several different kinds of movies, the child’s perspective fuses them together, and the movie becomes a startling representation of a society collapsing into chaos. Appropriately shot by “The Florida Project” cinematographer Alexis Zabe, “Fistful of Dirt” captures a modern apocalypse through innocent eyes.

The Chilean writer-director excels at subverting genre expectations, often melding dark comedy and suspense in surprising ways in movies ranging from “Nasty Baby” (an irreverent hipster farce that turns into a creepy thriller in the last act) to “Tyrel” (a race relations comedy until it becomes a creepy suspense
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Dunkirk,’ ‘Phoenix,’ ‘Wormwood,’ ‘The Unknown Girl,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Dunkirk (Christopher Nolan)

In the hours since viewing Dunkirk – the newest film from surprisingly divisive blockbuster director Christopher Nolan – one sensory recollection has stuck out above all others. Every time that British spitfire pilot Farrier (Tom Hardy) accelerates or banks his plane, the soundtrack fills with the noise of metallic rattling, an uncomfortable chorus of knocks and pings that lets you know exactly how much stress and force are
See full article at The Film Stage »

Innocence Lost: The Children of Roberto Rossellini’s War Trilogy

By Jacob Oller

Understanding wartime maturity was never so poignant. oberto Rossellini’s scathingly-scripted war trilogy – encompassing Paisan; Rome, Open City; and Germany Year Zero, which has also been called his neorealist trilogy – came after his well-received three films on fascism. The neorealist elements in these later films enabled his scripts to include things like regional dialects […]

The article Innocence Lost: The Children of Roberto Rossellini’s War Trilogy appeared first on Film School Rejects.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Florida Project,” which has just started its platform release across the country, what is the greatest child performance in a film?

Jordan Hoffman (@JHoffman), The Guardian, Vanity Fair

I can agonize over this question or I can go at this Malcolm Gladwell “Blink”-style. My answer is Tatum O’Neal in “Paper Moon.” She’s just so funny and tough, which of course makes the performance all the more heartbreaking. She won the freaking Oscar at age 10 for this and I’d really love to give a more deep cut response, but why screw around? Paper Moon is a perfect film and she is the lynchpin.
See full article at Indiewire »

Blu-ray Review: Rossellini's War Trilogy Gets Much Needed HD Upgrade From Criterion

Earlier this month The Criterion Collection rereleased Roberto Rossellini's War Trilogy on Blu-ray and it is one of the year's essential sets. The three included films, Rome Open City (1945), Paisan (1946), and Germany Year Zero (1948), are not only landmarks of world cinema, they are also incredibly brave and eye-opening works of art even all these years later. I'm not going to pretend that I have a lot to add to the mountains of critical and sociological analysis that already exists out there, I can definitely share why these films are so special to me. First, though, a basic rundown. Rome Open City is the story of the Italian resistance in Nazi-occupied Italy. The film was shot in 1945, shortly after the Nazis had...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Roberto Rossellini’s War Trilogy

Rome Open City, Paisan, Germany Year Zero: Filmed mostly on the streets in newly-liberated territory, Roberto Rossellini’s gripping war-related shows are blessed with new restorations but still reflect their rough origins. The second picture, the greater masterpiece, looks as if it were improvised out of sheer artistic will.

Roberto Rosselini’s War Trilogy

Rome Open City, Paisan, Germany Year Zero

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 500 (497, 498, 499)

1945-1948 / B&W / 1:37 & 1:33 flat full frame / 302 minutes / Street Date July 11, 2017 / available from the Criterion Collection 79.96

Starring: Aldo Fabrizi, Anna Magnani; Dots Johnson, Harriet White Medin; Edmund Moeschke, Franz-Otto Krüger.

Cinematography: Ubaldo Arata; Otello Martelli; Robert Julliard.

Film Editor: Eraldo Da Roma

Original Music: Renzo Rossellini

Written by Sergio Amidei, Alberto Consiglio, Federico Fellini; Klaus Mann, Marcello Pagliero, Alfred Hayes, Vasco Pratolini; Max Kolpé, Carlo Lizzani.

Directed by Roberto Rossellini

Criterion released an identical-for-content DVD set of this trilogy in 2010; the new Blu-ray
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Criterion in July 2017: Albert Brooks' Lost In America, Rossellini's War Trilogy, Tarkovsky's Stalker, Bresson's L'argent

The Criterion Collection's slate for July 2017 sells itself, to be honest. Albert Brook's Lost in America is one of my personal, all-time favorites. Others may prefer Andrei Tarkovsky's Stalker, Roberto Rossellini's War Trilogy, or Robert Bresson's final film L'argent. Or all of them, as your preference and budgetary needs dictate. Read onward for all the details; verbiage provided by Criterion. Roberto Rossellini'S War Trilogy Roberto Rossellini is one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. And it was with his trilogy of films made during and after World War II - Rome Open City, Paisan, and Germany Year Zero - that he left his first transformative mark on cinema. With their stripped-down aesthetic, largely nonprofessional casts, and unorthodox approaches to storytelling, these intensely...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Films from Andrei Tarkovsky, Robert Bresson & More Coming to The Criterion Collection This July

The Criterion Collection will venture to the Zone this July, and much more, as they’ve announced their new titles for the month. Andrei Tarkovsky‘s long-rumored sci-fi masterpiece Stalker will arrive with a new 2K restoration. The release will also include a new interview with author Geoff Dyer and newly translated English subtitles. Also arriving in July is Albert Brooks‘ satirical comedy Lost in America, featuring a new conversation with the director and Robert Weide, as well as interviews with the cast and crew.

One of the most notable releases of the month is Robert Bresson‘s masterful final film L’argent, which tracks a counterfeit bill through Paris, and the people it touches. Lastly, Roberto Rossellini‘s powerful War Trilogy is getting a much-deserved Blu-ray upgrade with new versions of Rome Open City, Paisan, and Germany Year Zero. Check out the high-resolution cover art below and full release details.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Criterion Collection Announces July 2017 Additions, Including Tarkovsky’s ‘Stalker’ and Bresson’s ‘L’argent’

Criterion Collection Announces July 2017 Additions, Including Tarkovsky’s ‘Stalker’ and Bresson’s ‘L’argent’
Summer 2017 is shaping up to be quite the exciting season for The Criterion Collection. In May, the library will welcome cult favorite “Ghost World” and recent Palme d’or winner “Dheepan,” while June finds Kenji Mizoguchi’s “Ugetsu,” Hitchcock’s silent classic “The Lodger” and Sam Peckinpah’s controversial “Straw Dogs” joining the club. Criterion has now added its July 2017 additions to their summer slate, and they include movies from auteurs like Tarkovsky, Rossellini and Bresson. Below is the complete list of July additions, with descriptions provided by Criterion.

Read More: The Criterion Collection Announces June Titles: ‘The Marseille Trilogy, ‘They Live by Night,’ ‘The Lodger’ and More

Stalker” (1979) – Available July 18

Andrei Tarkovsky’s final Soviet feature is a metaphysical journey through an enigmatic postapocalyptic landscape, and a rarefied cinematic experience like no other. A hired guide—the Stalker—leads a writer and a scientist into the heart of the Zone,
See full article at Indiewire »

Close-Up on "General Della Rovere": Rossellini Returns to War

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Mubi is playing General Della Rovere (1959) in the United States September 1 - 30, 2016.For a time, it seemed Roberto Rossellini was ready to leave behind the devastation of World War II, a milieu he as much as anyone helped to indelibly commit to cinematic memory with his Neorealist masterworks. While a traumatized psyche remained in films that followed his trilogy of Rome, Open City (1945), Paisan (1946), and Germany Year Zero (1948), it was revealed via a more subtle manifestation of conflict related angst. Rossellini had moved beyond explicit depictions of the war and its aftermath, even while lingering psychological effects still abound (see his collaborations with Ingrid Bergman). This would change in 1959, with the release of General Della Rovere, Rossellini's first full-fledged wartime film in more than 10 years. While not of the caliber of these earlier titles (not really even in
See full article at MUBI »

"Mauvaise Graine": Billy Wilder's Swift and Satisfying Directorial Debut

  • MUBI
Mubi is exclusively showing Billy Wilder and Alexander Esway's Mauvaise Graine a.k.a. Bad Seed (1934) in the United States and most countries around the world from August 18 - September 16, 2016.In light of his illustrious Hollywood career to follow, Billy Wilder’s obscure directorial debut, Mauvaise Graine (1934), may seem like a mere curiosity. Making the film as he was passing through France by way of Germany en route to America, Wilder regarded the work with little adoration. For him, the experience was one rife with difficulty; it wasn’t fun, there was tremendous pressure, and he simply wasn’t accustomed to have such sweeping control over a production. But the writing was on the wall by 1933, and Wilder, like so many others, was keen to get out of Berlin while the getting was good. Arriving first in Paris, he met other film professionals seeking refuge from the burgeoning Nazi party,
See full article at MUBI »

Phoenix

What's contemporary Europe got that we ain't got? Powerful, serious filmmaking like that by Christian Petzold, starring the impressive Nina Hoss. Their sixth collaboration is a loaded narrative that takes some pretty wild narrative themes -- plastic surgery, hidden identities -- and spins them in a suspenseful new direction. Phoenix Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 809 2014 / Color / 2:39 widescreen (Super 35) / 98 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date April 26, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Nina Hoss, Ronald Zehrfeld, Nina Kunzendorf, Imogen Kogge. Cinematography Hans Fromm Film Editor Bettina Böhler Original Music Stefan Will Written by Christian Petzold, Haroun Farocki from ideas in the book Le retour des cendres by Hubert Monteilhet Produced by Florian Koerner von Gustorf, Michael Weber Directed by Christian Petzold

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I had seen only one Christian Petzold feature before this one. 2012's Barbara is an excellent Deutsche-Millennial thriller starring Barbara Hoss as an East German doctor trying to do
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Race in Post-War German Cinema in Drama 'Toxi' (Video)

For anyone interested in foreign films, one of the most interesting periods of German filmmaking was the post war period between 1946 to the mid 1960’s. In effect, only two types of films were being made: pure escapist film such as musicals and comedies that were designed to make the audience completely forget the ugly events of the recent past. And then there were films like "The Lost One," "Germany Year Zero," and "Murderers Among Us" which explicitly dealt with the aftermath of the horrors of World War II and Germany’s guilt and repercussions. But of all the films, one of the most fascinating, and worthy of rediscovery, is the 1952 film...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Wake Up and Kill

Gian Maria Volonté has a big part in this prime quality Italo crime thriller blessed with a great score by Ennio Morricone. But the movie belongs to Robert Hoffman as the real-life public enemy who earned the alias 'The Machine Gun Soloist.' Director Carlo Lizzani's realistic treatment glamorizes nothing and implicates the police in shady policies as well. Award-winning co-star Lisa Gastoni is the woman who loves Hoffman, and is tempted to betray him. Wake Up and Kill Blu-ray + DVD Arrow Video (UK) 1966 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 124 98 min / Svegliati e uccidi; Lutring; Wake Up and Die / Street Date November 24, 2015 / 29.95 Starring Robert Hoffmann, Lisa Gastoni, Gian Maria Volonté, Claudio Camaso, Renato Niccolai, Ottavio Fanfani, Pupo De Luca, Corrado Olmi. Cinematography Armando Nannuzzi Film Editing Franco Fraticelli Original Music Ennio Morricone Written by Ugo Pirro, Carlo Lizzani Produced by Jacques Bar, Joseph Fryd, Carlo Lizzani Directed by Carlo Lizzani  

Reviewed by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Details: Home Again, Home Again

  • MUBI
Amat Escalante's Los bastardos is playing on Mubi in the Us through December 9.Having directed three Mexican feature films, Spanish-born director Amat Escalante, grows more and more ambitious with each film as he refines his sobering and rigorous long-take aesthetic. At the same time, these features form a cohesive unit in which narratives center on, in, and around houses. If Roman Polanski has his apartment trilogy, Amat Escalante has his house trilogy. For now.In the spare opening of Sangre (2005), a man lies flat on his back. Blood trickles down his forehead. As he slowly sits up, a woman briskly walks through the frame, from the upper right to the bottom left-hand corner. She ignores the man completely. What is this abstract image of? Ignorance? Humiliation? Defeat? Sangre unfolds the image like an accordion. The supine position mutates and varies all throughout the film, evoking resting, sex, defeat, and death.
See full article at MUBI »

[Review] Theeb

If the impetus behind many feature debuts — great and terrible alike — is to proclaim a helmer’s talents for all who might bother listening, Theeb‘s greatest distinction lies in its reliance on the misunderstood. The impression left by Naji Abu Nowar, credited as a co-writer alongside Bassel Ghandour, is a greater interest in what we must presume and concede than what we can understand and apply, instead trusting that his collaborators will utilize their own strengths — strengths often secondary to the logic or understanding that might go into a single moment — for harmonizing a vision of dangerous lands.

With tonal and pacing sensibilities that are nestled somewhere between Jauja and Timbuktu on my personal “languid, vista-dominated films of 2015″ chart, it’s mostly built on intrigue — the “who” and “what” of its events coinciding with the “how” of a scenario’s possible outcomes. Its action is set circa 1916 in the
See full article at The Film Stage »

Roberto Rossellini: The War Trilogy review – a landmark in world cinema

(Roberto Rossellini, 1945-48; BFI, 15; Blu-ray)

The term neorealism was first widely used in the late 1940s to describe what became the most famous and influential film movement. It sprang up in Italy as a reaction against the artificiality of the so-called “white telephone” school of upper-class comedies and melodramas then popular under fascism, favouring instead naturalistic pictures shot on authentic locations using non-professional actors. Luchino Visconti’s gritty Ossessione (1943) is usually identified as the first genuine example. But the name that will always be associated with neorealism is Roberto Rossellini, and most especially his Rome, Open City (1945) and Paisà (1946), two rough, grainy movies set in Italy during the second world war. They helped change the face of world cinema and, with Germany Year Zero (1948), set in the ruins of postwar Berlin, came to be known as his War Trilogy.

Born in Rome, where his father’s construction firm put up

Exclusive Interview: Talking 'Fury' With Director David Ayer

Director David Ayer made his directorial debut with his original screenplay Harsh Times. The gritty drama, starring Christian Bale and Freddy Rodriguez, which was released in the fall of 2006. Ayer garnered widespread acclaim and accolades for his hyper-realistic portrayal of life behind the blue line in End of Watch (2012). He moved to Los Angeles as a teenager and the experiences of his upbringing shaped much of his artistic vision and his inside knowledge and affection for the culture surrounding law enforcement can be seen throughout his work.

Ayer joined the United States Navy, where he served as sonar man aboard a nuclear attack submarine during the Cold War. After an honorable discharge, Ayer began writing. He wrote and was a co-producer on his “calling card” spec script Training Day, which became a hit film and garnered Denzel Washington an Academy Award for Best Actor.

Ayer also co-wrote the submarine thriller U-571,
See full article at LRM Online »

Race in Post-War German Cinema in Drama 'Toxi' (Video)

For anyone interested in foreign films, one of the most interesting periods of German filmmaking was the post war period between 1946 to the mid 1960’s. In effect, only two types of films were being made: pure escapist film such as musicals and comedies that were designed to make the audience complete forget the ugly events of the recent past. But then there were films such as "The Lost One," "Germany Year Zero," and "Murderers Among Us" which explicitly dealt with the aftermath of the horrors of World War II and Germany’s guilt and its repercussions. But of all the films, one of the most fascinating, and worthy of rediscovery, is the 1952...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »
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