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A Stolen Life (1946) Poster

(1946)

Trivia

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This film, along with his previous post-war picture, Gilda (1946), relaunched Glenn Ford's career after spending two years in the U.S. Marines during World War II.
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The negligee Bill buys for Pat (in front of Kate) for $69.50 would be the equivalent of $853 in 2016.
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The last film Bette Davis made at Warner Brothers (during her contract from 1932-1949) to make a profit upon release.
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Because of her constant insistence for better productions to work on, and an overall better atmosphere on set, Jack L. Warner asked Bette Davis to produce the film. It would be the first and only time she would be able to do this. Reportedly, she was so overworked and also intrigued by this job that she started a relationship with the director of this film to iron out her mind.
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"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on August 25, 1947 with Bette Davis and Glenn Ford reprising their film roles.
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Other actors considered for the roll of Bill were Dennis Morgan and Robert Alda - both under contract to Warner Brothers at the time. But Bette Davis insisted on Glenn Ford, who was under contract to Columbia Pictures. After seeing a secret screen test of Ford that was done by Davis, Jack L. Warner gave in and paid Columbia to have them loan him out for this film.
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First film of Bette Davis as a producer under her new contract with Warner Brothers. (Note the "A B.D. Production" in the opening credits.) Davis left the day-to-day work of producing the film to others, but she did choose this project, and hired the writer and director.
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The aircraft Bill gets off when he returns to New York appears to be a Douglas B-23 Dragon converted to civil use.
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The aircraft that Glenn Ford exits does appear to be a B-23/UC-23 Dragon. Looks to be in a cargo configuration do to the lack of windows. The omission of placards or company markings suggest it was a surplus airframe that was waiting for decommissioning and/or post war sale.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

Bette Davis later did a "remake" of this same story-line - Dead Ringer (1964). But in that version, Davis outright murders her wealthy twin sister in order to take her place, rather than merely happening to survive a boating accident in which one twin drowns.
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