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Holiday (1938) Poster

(1938)

Trivia

Edward Everett Horton repeats the role of Nick Potter, which he also played in the previous version of the film, Holiday (1930).
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Upset at the negative publicity that star Katharine Hepburn was receiving in advance of the film, studio boss Harry Cohn proposed to take out an ad in Variety asking "What is wrong with Katharine Hepburn?" Hepburn cautioned Cohn against the idea stating "Look out! They may tell you!"
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Linda Seton was loosely based on Gertrude Sanford Legendre, a former débutante who left high society to become a big-game hunter and later spied for the OSS during WWII.
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The third of four movies pairing Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn.
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In the original play, Nick and Susan Potter are wealthy socialites. Due to the depression, the plot was altered so that Johnny, who represented "the common man" would have more ordinary, down to earth friends.
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George Cukor considered Rita Hayworth for the role of Julia Seaton, given her dark hair and slight resemblance to Hepburn. However, she was judged too inexperienced and Doris Nolan took the part.
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Katharine Hepburn understudied the role of Linda Seton (played by Hope Williams) in the original Broadway play. She also performed a scene from Holiday for her first screen test, which led to her first film role.
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When the Potters receive a telegram from Johnny telling them that Linda will not sail with them from New York, the address on the telegram is one on West 114th Street in that city, which is where the Columbia University buildings and housing begin, indicating that Mr. Potter's professorship is at Columbia.
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The screenwriter of this version of "Holiday", Donald Ogden Stewart, played the role of Nick Potter in the original Broadway production of the play.
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Eighteen months before Clark Gable in Gone with the Wind (1939), Katharine Hepburn says "damned" in a Production Code-approved Hollywood movie. The occurrence isn't gratuitous: She's recounting her experience in amateur theatrics and, in camp style, performs a fragment of Lady MacBeth's "Out damned spot" sleepwalking line from William Shakespeare.
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Joan Bennett and Ginger Rogers were considered to play Linda Seton.
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Scenes were filmed in Bishop, California to depict Lake Placid, New York that were intended to be the beginning of the picture. The idea was to "open up" the stage play by utilizing exteriors. However, when George Cukor saw the footage, he cut it. Only a few stills, used for theater lobby cards, survive.
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The play originally opened in New York City On 26 November 1928 and ran 229 performances.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 2000 list of the 500 movies nominated for the Top 100 Funniest American Movies.
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Columbia bought this script in a package deal from RKO in 1936 for $80,000 ($1.45M in 2018). This project was intended to reunite Cary Grant and Irene Dunn from The Awful Truth (1937), but director George Cukor chose Hepburn instead and she was borrowed from RKO where she was still under contract, and had just turned down the lead in Mother Carey's Chickens (1938).
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Final feature film of Jean Dixon.
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Jewelry for this film was designed and provided by Paul Flato, for years a famous jeweler to the stars.
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In the poster art and some surviving stills, Hepburn wears a light-colored straw hat with her final costume in the film. this hat never appears in the film and must have been used only for photos before the film's release before being replaced with the wide-brimmed dark felt hat that is actually in the film.
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This version is a remake of The 1930 American pre-Code version starring Ann Harding, Mary Astor, Edward Everett Horton, Robert Ames and Hedda Hopper. It was produced and released by Pathé Exchange.
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Released just several months after another Cary Grant-Katharine Hepburn pairing, Bringing Up Baby (1938).
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In her December 1972 interview by Leonard Maltin, Madge Evans declared: "I wanted very much to be in 'Holiday' with Katharine Hepburn. I had made two films with George Cukor, and I had known him in New York. He wanted me, but I was under contract to Metro and that was being made at Columbia."
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This film is part of the Criterion Collection, spine #1009.
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The song that Ned (Lew Ayres) starts to play before his own composition, is "Bei Mir Bistu Shein", a Yiddish song that was originally written for a comedy musical. A version of it was later a worldwide hit recorded by The Andrews sisters in November, 1937.
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This film was restored and preserved by the UCLA Film and Television Archive in 1991 using prints and other material from Columbia Pictures, The Library of Congress and UCLA.
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This film has a 100% rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on 24 critic reviews.
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