6.1/10
1,668
33 user 10 critic

Going Hollywood (1933)

Passed | | Musical, Romance | 22 December 1933 (USA)
A love-struck teacher pursues a radio singer to Hollywood.

Director:

Raoul Walsh

Writer:

Donald Ogden Stewart (screen play)
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

A young woman living in an Irish fishing village inherits her late grandfather's estate, but is forced to spend three years in England training to be a proper lady to collect the fortune.

Director: Robert Z. Leonard
Stars: Marion Davies, Onslow Stevens, J. Farrell MacDonald
Not So Dumb (1930)
Certificate: Passed Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

Not-so-smart chatterbox Dulcy Parker does and says all the wrong things, but they right themselves to prove she's not so dumb after all.

Director: King Vidor
Stars: Marion Davies, Elliott Nugent, Raymond Hackett
Certificate: Passed Drama | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6/10 X  

The married friends of a New York chorus girl encourage her to pursue a handsome but poor socialite.

Director: Harry Beaumont
Stars: Marion Davies, Lawrence Gray, Walter Catlett
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A talented boxer and a gifted dancer hope to increase their waning popularity by inventing a fictitious love affair for the benefit of the tabloids.

Director: Lloyd Bacon
Stars: Marion Davies, Clark Gable, Allen Jenkins
Comedy | Music | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

A chambermaid impersonates the fictional subject of a composite photo that won a beauty contest, with whom a famed aviator falls in love.

Director: Mervyn LeRoy
Stars: Marion Davies, Pat O'Brien, Dick Powell
Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Lecherous bosses make it difficult for an attractive secretary to keep jobs, so she decides to appear considerably more homely in hopes of holding onto work.

Director: Lloyd Bacon
Stars: Marion Davies, Robert Montgomery, Frank McHugh
Operator 13 (1934)
Certificate: Passed Drama | History | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.1/10 X  

Union spy Gail Loveless impersonates a black maid in the early days of the Civil War, but complications arise when she falls in love with a Confederate officer.

Director: Richard Boleslawski
Stars: Marion Davies, Gary Cooper, Jean Parker
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

Two young women find their friendship strained when one wins a role in a Broadway show, and the other's boyfriend begins to fall for her.

Director: Edmund Goulding
Stars: Marion Davies, Robert Montgomery, Billie Dove
Five and Ten (1931)
Certificate: Passed Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

After her businessman father moves her family from Kansas City to New York, a woman falls in love with an engaged man.

Director: Robert Z. Leonard
Stars: Marion Davies, Leslie Howard, Richard Bennett
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

After a trapeze performer is injured during an accident, she is moved to a minister's house where they both fall in love.

Director: Alfred Santell
Stars: Marion Davies, Clark Gable, C. Aubrey Smith
Drama | History | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.1/10 X  

Napoleon needs money to fight his wars in Europe so he wants 20 million dollars for the Louisiana Territory in the United States. To help the negotiations, he sends his brother, Jerome, to ... See full summary »

Director: Frank Borzage
Stars: Marion Davies, Dick Powell, Charles Ruggles
The Red Mill (1927)
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A tavern worker and the daughter of a burgomaster enter into elaborate masquerades in order to win the hearts of the men they love.

Director: Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle
Stars: Marion Davies, Owen Moore, Louise Fazenda
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Marion Davies ... Sylvia Bruce
Bing Crosby ... Bill Williams
Fifi D'Orsay ... Lili Yvonne
Stuart Erwin ... Ernest P. Baker
Ned Sparks ... Conroy
Patsy Kelly ... Jill
Bobby Watson ... Thompson
The Radio Rogues The Radio Rogues ... The Radio Rogues (as Three Radio Rogues)
Edit

Storyline

Sylvia is the French teacher at Briarcroft's School for Girls, but she wants to find romance. When she hears Bill on the radio, she decides to leave and thank him. But he is on his way to Hollywood with Lili to make a movie. When Sylvia gets to Hollywood, she finds that seeing Bill again is almost impossible, but she gets a job in the chorus. Then when Lili quits the picture, Sylvia is tapped to play her character. But the part she wants is with Bill, a part that Lili seems to have. Written by Tony Fontana <tony.fontana@spacebbs.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Musical | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

22 December 1933 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Paid to Laugh See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$914,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

This film failed at the box office, resulting in a loss to MGM of $269,000 ($5M in 2018) according to studio records. See more »

Quotes

Sylvia Bruce: Are you going somewhere?
Bill 'Billy' Williams: Yes. I'm going to Hollywood.
Sylvia Bruce: Oh, oh, that's too bad. But, why are you going?
Bill 'Billy' Williams: I'm going out there to make a movie. Don't you read the papers?
Sylvia Bruce: No. And I don't go to movies very often either.
See more »

Connections

References Reaching for the Moon (1930) See more »

Soundtracks

Cinderella's Fella
(1933) (uncredited)
Music by Nacio Herb Brown
Lyrics by Arthur Freed
Sung by Fifi D'Orsay
Reprised by Marion Davies imitating Fifi D'Orsay
Reprised by Davies dancing with a singing offscreen male chorus
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
"Take me where the daisies cover the country lane"
21 September 2010 | by Steffi_PSee all my reviews

The actress Marion Davies, when she is now remembered at all, is remembered as the young(ish) mistress of William Randolph Hearst, the newspaper magnate who more or less bankrolled her Hollywood career. As such, it's widely assumed that she had no talent, except in the eyes of the devoted Mr Hearst. This at least was the impression given by her supposed parody in Citizen Kane, an image which though indirect has tarnished her memory no end. But whatever the truth about her, the amount of money thrown into her productions means they afford at least a treat or two.

Going Hollywood, for example, pairs her with a young Bing Crosby. It's clear that at this point the studio didn't really think of him as much more than a good-looking crooner and weren't really pushing his personality, but he certainly adds musical credence to the production, and his laid-back sense of humour is occasionally allowed a tease or two. Another delight of the cast is 1930s comedy institution Ned Sparks, who with his inimitable manner can make even the simplest of lines sound funny. There's a real no-no however when a jumped-up Stuart Erwin vehemently puts Sparks down, a moment which simply looks embarrassing. There ought to have been a rule in Hollywood – nobody gets the better of Ned Sparks.

The story of Going Hollywood was by the very prestigious 30s writer Frances Marion (she also wrote The Champ, among others), and the screenplay is by acclaimed romcom expert Donald Ogden Stuart. It is of course, an absolute slice of silliness, the opening business with a rebellious Davies giving up her job as a teacher as if it was something she had been forced into setting the tone for things to come, but Frances Marion's simplistic tale of a girl making it big in movies is the very quintessence of MGM dreaminess, and Stuart's sharp wit gives it a nice gloss. Logic and depth barely matter in a fairytale such as this.

The list of big names continues, with music by Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed (you know, of Singin' in the Rain fame). The songs are pretty and the smooth arrangement suits Crosby well. What is nice though is the way they are used. Freed's lyrics only relate vaguely to the material, but each number is nevertheless woven into the narrative in a number of interesting ways. "Beautiful Girl" is part of a radio broadcast which a pyjama-sporting Crosby delivers while doing his morning business. "We'll Make Hay while the Sun Shines" takes place in a dream sequence. In other words, the narrative does not take a break for the music, and the songs are never merely presentational performances. This may have been a contribution of Walter Wanger, who always tended to oversee a flowing style in his pictures.

Then again, it might also have been influenced by director Raoul Walsh (incidentally a pal of Hearst) who, like in the musical numbers, never made movies as a presentation. Walsh's camera is almost always right inside the action, either looking in on it (the number of instances of characters looking into lens is high in Going Hollywood) or looking outwards (as in several point-of-view shots). Walsh likes to place his audience where his characters are, especially at key moments, giving a real intensity to the scenes between Davies and Crosby. This closeness of Walsh's style gives a real cramped feeling to many of the interiors, and a sense of romantic escapism lies in shots like Davies staring at the stars out of her bedroom window or Crosby gazing up at the cavernous roof of the railway station. In a funny kind of way these moments link to Walsh's westerns, where the homesteads were always dull and squalid while the plains were vast and inviting.

So Going Hollywood sees its star supported by a big wall of talent. But what about Ms Davies herself? She is really not all that bad. Her style is quite reserved, not at all vulgar or exaggerated as one might expect, and she does have a flair for comic expression which in this kind of picture makes up for her lack of a good singing voice. She certainly doesn't deserve the reputation given to her by Citizen Kane (which Orson Welles belatedly stated was not intentional). Still, there is a reason she wasn't an especially popular star and needed the support of her millionaire boyfriend. If you look at the most successful performers of the depression era, they are people like Will Rogers, Marie Dressler and Wallace Beery, who what they lacked in looks they made up for in rugged charm. An actress who was merely pretty and competent was hardly deemed special in 1933.


7 of 9 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 33 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Free Movies and TV Shows You Can Watch Now

On IMDb TV, you can catch Hollywood hits and popular TV series at no cost. Select any poster below to play the movie, totally free!

Browse free movies and TV series

Stream Trending TV Series With Prime Video

Explore popular and recently added TV series available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed