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Here's Where You've Seen Peaky Blinders' Billy Grade Before

Here's Where You've Seen Peaky Blinders' Billy Grade Before
Peaky Blinders' season five sees Irish actor Emmett J. Scanlan play Billy Grade, an ex-professional footballer and budding singer who reluctantly gets drafted into the Peaky Blinders gang. Having starred in numerous TV shows and movies, including Guardians of the Galaxy and The Fall, Scanlan is no stranger to our screens, but many of you probably know him best from his tenure on Hollyoaks. His résumé continues to impress with an upcoming role in the British crime drama Gangs of London. You can currently catch him on Treadstone, USA's Jason Bourne TV spinoff.

If you've been watching Peaky Blinders and wanted to know more about this scene-stealing star, read on for all the details.

Related: The Shelby Family May Be Fictional, but Peaky Blinders Definitely Isn't Just a TV Drama Emmett J. Scanlan was born on Jan. 31, 1979, in Dublin, Ireland. He studied history and sociology at Maynooth University before
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Here's Where You’ve Seen Peaky Blinders’ Billy Grade Before

  • Popsugar
Peaky Blinders' season five sees Irish actor Emmett J. Scanlan play Billy Grade, an ex-professional footballer and budding singer who reluctantly gets drafted into the Peaky Blinders gang. Having starred in numerous TV shows and movies, including Guardians of the Galaxy and The Fall, Scanlan is no stranger to our screens, but many of you probably know him best from his tenure on Hollyoaks. His résumé continues to impress with an upcoming role in the British crime drama Gangs of London. You can currently catch him on Treadstone, USA's Jason Bourne TV spinoff.

If you've been watching Peaky Blinders and wanted to know more about this scene-stealing star, read on for all the details.

Related: The Shelby Family May Be Fictional, but Peaky Blinders Definitely Isn't Just a TV Drama Emmett J. Scanlan was born on Jan. 31, 1979, in Dublin, Ireland. He studied history and sociology at Maynooth University before
See full article at Popsugar »

Video Review – The Nightingale (2019)

The Nightingale, 2019.

Directed by Jennifer Kent.

Starring Aisling Franciosi, Sam Claflin, Baykali Ganambarr, Damon Herriman, Harry Greenwood, Ewen Leslie and Magnolia Maymuru

In this video review, Ej Moreno shares his thoughts on The Nightingale, the controversial new film from Jennifer Kent, director of The Babadook.

Set in the British penal colony of Van Diemen’s Land in 1825, the movie stars Aisling Franciosi as Clare, a young Irish convict woman who embarks on a quest for revenge against a British officer for a terrible act of violence committed against her family.

Watch the review here, and be sure to head on over to our YouTube channels for more exclusive videos and content…

The Nightingale is a meditation on the consequences of violence and the price of seeking vengeance. Set during the colonization of Australia in 1825, the film follows Clare (Aisling Franciosi), a 21-year-old Irish convict. Having served her 7-year sentence, she
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Alessandro Nivola, Gemma Arterton Head Killer Cast For BBC One/FX 3-Part Adaptation Of Rumer Godden Steamy Lit Classic ‘Black Narcissus’

  • Deadline
Alessandro Nivola, Gemma Arterton Head Killer Cast For BBC One/FX 3-Part Adaptation Of Rumer Godden Steamy Lit Classic ‘Black Narcissus’
Exclusive: Alessandro Nivola and Gemma Arterton head a killer cast for a three-part adaptation of the 1939 classic Rumer Godden literary novel Black Narcissus, a tale of sexual repression and forbidden love. BAFTA-winning writer Amanda Coe wrote the three hourlong episodes and renowned Dp Charlotte Bruus Christensen makes her directing debut.

BBC One is producing with DNA TV and FX Productions. The exec producers are Andrew Macdonald, Allon Reich and Coe for DNA TV and FX Productions and Lucy Richer for the BBC. Filming starts in October in Jomsom, Nepal and Pinewood Studios, UK.

Black Narcissus was previously adapted for screen in 1947 by Powell and Pressburger and subsequently won two Oscars for Cinematography (Jack Cardiff) and Art Direction (Alfred Junge).

Arterton plays Sister Clodagh, the leader of the nuns of St Faiths, who travel to Nepal to
See full article at Deadline »

Vertigo Releasing takes UK rights to Jennifer Kent’s ‘The Nightingale’ (exclusive)

Film will be released day-and-date in November.

Distribution outfit Vertigo Releasing has picked up UK and Ireland rights to Jennifer Kent’s thriller The Nightingale, an award winner at Venice last year, from FilmNation.

Vertigo is planning to release the title day-and-date in cinemas and online on November 29.

Set during the colonisation of Australia in 1825, the film follows a 21-year-old Irish convict, played by Aisling Franciosi. Having served her seven-year sentence, she is desperate to be free of her abusive master, played by Sam Claflin who refuses to release her. Michael Sheasby and Baykali Ganambarr also star.

The project was
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Bo Report: ‘The Nightingale’ opens while ‘The Australian Dream’ rallies

The Nightingale.’

While Jennifer Kent’s The Nightingale has achieved an 86 per cent fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes since the world premiere at the Venice International Film Festival, many critics have described the tale of rape, murder and revenge as harrowing and bleak.

So in that context the film’s opening in Australia last weekend via Transmission Films was quite respectable – and some exhibitors expect it will have a leggy run.

Meanwhile Madman Entertainment’s The Australian Dream had a buoyant second weekend, helped by word-of-mouth and the two-for-one ticket offer to Afl members.

Rachel Ward’s Palm Beach advanced to $3.8 million after nabbing $305,000 in its fourth weekend, easing by 31 per cent for Universal Pictures. Kriv Stenders’ Danger Close: The Battle of Long Tan dipped by just 16 per cent to $250,000 in its fourth, delivering $2.5 million for Transmission Films.

The Nightingale grossed $98,000 on 32 screens, bringing the total including festival screenings to
See full article at IF.com.au »

Review: Jennifer Kent's "The Nightingale"

by Ben Miller

In the world of Jennifer Kent’s The Nightingale, no one is safe unless they've won the lottery. If you lucked into being born as a white English male in 19th century Tasmania, you can rest easy in the knowledge you are powerful. If you are a woman, of another race, or from another country, that same luxury is not afforded to you. Death and misery looms around every corner.

The titular Nightingale comes in the form of Clare (Game of Thrones Aisling Franciosi) as she serves as a maid and singer for a group of British officers. She is held there as penance for her crimes of thievery, being Irish and being a woman. She is overseen by Lieutenant Hawkins (Sam Claflin), who is procrastinating processing her release, due to his infatuation with her. Clare’s husband Aidan (a wonderfully warm Michael Sheasby) tries to persuade Hawkins to release her,
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Nightingale – Review

Baykali Ganambarr as “Billy” and Aisling Franciosi as “Clare” in Jennifer Kent’s The Nightingale. Courtesy of IFC Films. An IFC Films release. Photo by Matt Nettheim

The writer/director of The Babadook, Jennifer Kent, follows up the chilling horror film with a gripping drama set in 1825 Australia, a tale of violence and revenge that is almost Shakespearean. The Nightingale is a tale of vengeance but it is also a story of self-discovery, and of finding a common human bond with someone who appears at first quite different.

Nightingale” is the nickname given to a beautiful Irish convict, Clare (Aisling Franciosi), for her golden singing voice, by the British troops at the remote Tasmanian outpost where she has served out her sentence. Clare is in the custody of British officer Lieutenant Hawkins (Sam Claflin), but she has served her sentence, and with both a husband and baby now, she wants to be released.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘The Nightingale’: Aisling Franciosi Discusses Her Harrowing Star Turn & The Rigorous Sensitivity Of Director Jennifer Kent [Interview]

Many who’ve seen Jennifer Kent’s new revenge epic “The Nightingale” have sensed a traumatic link to her prior outing, “The Babadook” (2014). In both films, a stranded woman is confronted with malice beyond her imagination. Whether inflicted by a black-cloaked demon or the British Empire, the ensuing scars come to redefine her humanity.

But trauma is just the subject matter of “The Nightingale” and “The Babadook.” If there’s a commonality in authorship between the two films it’s that Kent is implicitly and explicitly challenging audiences with her portrayals of pain.

Continue reading ‘The Nightingale’: Aisling Franciosi Discusses Her Harrowing Star Turn & The Rigorous Sensitivity Of Director Jennifer Kent [Interview] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Podtalk: Aisling Franciosi Takes the Lead in ‘The Nightingale’

Chicago – The “star is born” expression is not to be used lightly, yet it absolutely applies to the performance of Aisling Franciosi (Lyanna Stark in “Game of Thrones”) in the role of Clare for “The Nightingale.” As a late 19th Century woman with nothing to lose, she suffers an emotional death, a survival rebirth and humanist hope.

Aisling Franciosi at the 7th Chicago Critics Film Festival

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

The Nightingale” is a meditation on the consequences of violence and the price of seeking vengeance. Set during the colonization of Australia in 1825, the film focuses on 21-year-old Irish convict Clare (Franciosi). Having served her sentence, she is desperate to be free of her abusive master, Lieutenant Hawkins (Sam Clafin), who refuses to release her from his charge. Clare’s husband Aidan (Michael Sheasby) retaliates and she then becomes the victim of a unspeakable
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Kiah Roache-Turner’s ‘Nekrotronic’ invades the Us as ‘The Nightingale’ expands

‘Nekrotronic.’

Kiah Roache-Turner’s Nekrotronic opened in the Us last weekend as a multi-platform release.

Momentum Pictures launched the sci-fi horror comedy starring Monica Bellucci, Ben O’Toole, David Wenham, Caroline Ford, Tess Haubrich and Bob Epine Savea in cinemas in 10 cities and on VOD and digital HD.

The eOne-owned distributor did not share box office figures, which are typically modest for day-and-date releases. The benefit of the theatrical exposure is that the reviews and publicity give the film a profile which pays off in ancillary revenues.

The director trimmed five minutes of exposition scenes after the world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival, resulting in more favourable reviews, particularly from genre websites.

For example, We Are Movie Geek’s Marc Butterfield hailed the film as “hilarious, fun, action packed, and full of gross, splashy, gooey moments; in other words, fantastic.”

Butterfield observed: “The movie has a nice amalgamation of story elements from Ghostbusters,
See full article at IF.com.au »

‘The Nightingale’ Star Says On-Set Psychologists Were Needed to Cope With Film’s Brutality

‘The Nightingale’ Star Says On-Set Psychologists Were Needed to Cope With Film’s Brutality
Australian director Jennifer Kent’s “The Nightingale,” which is currently in theaters, is a pulverizing and brutal sit. Already audiences across the globe have reportedly walked out of screenings of the film, which features several scenes of vicious sexual assault.

In a recent New York Magazine interview, breakout star Baykali Ganambarr talked about how the filmmakers coped with the brutality of “The Nightingale,” which follows an anguished young woman’s quest for vengeance following a hideous act of violence brought upon her family in 1820s Tasmania. Underpinning this brutal revenge story is the backdrop of colonial war between British imperialists and the black indigenous Tasmanians whose land is being ravaged by their occupiers.

Ganambarr plays the Aboriginal Tasmanian that Clare (Aisling Franciosi) drags through the wilderness to exact her revenge. While Billy’s (Ganambarr) communication skills are limited, the two nonetheless find common ground, forming the foundation for the desperate
See full article at Indiewire »

The Nightingale Is One of 2019’s Most Challenging Movies

Don Kaye Aug 8, 2019

The director of The Babadook returns with a dark, disturbing historical horror movie in The Nightingale.

It was in 2014 when Australian filmmaker Jennifer Kent stunned the world with her debut feature, The Babadook. The horror tale, about a widowed mother and her young son who are haunted by a presence that may or may not be solely in their minds, was both a genuinely frightening genre exercise as well as a searing study of grief, motherhood and loneliness. It became one of the first movies to lead the current wave of what some critics call “elevated” horror, films like It Follows, The Witch and Hereditary that combine visceral terror with sophisticated emotional/psychological underpinnings.

While fans might have hoped that Kent continue in the genre (and she most likely will at some point -- more on that later), she has pivoted to a different kind of horror with her second feature,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Us moviegoers turn out for Jennifer Kent’s ‘The Nightingale’

The Nightingale.’

Jennifer Kent’s The Nightingale platformed in Los Angeles and New York last weekend, drawing sizable audiences and largely positive reviews from Us critics.

Us distributor IFC Films launched the female-driven revenge thriller at Arclight Hollywood and New York’s IFC Centre, grossing $US40,000, with sold-out shows on Friday and Saturday.

The 1825-set tale starring Aisling Franciosi, Sam Claflin, newcomer Baykali Ganambarr, Michael Sheasby, Damon Herriman, Harry Greenwood and Ewen Leslie will expand in both cities and open in Austin, Texas, Washington, D.C., San Francisco and Boston on August 9.

Kristina Ceyton, who produced with Kent and Made Up Stories’ Bruna Papandrea and Steve Hutensky, tells If the roll-out will encompass at least 100 screens over the next few weeks.

“The upcoming support we have from the exhibition community has been outstanding, with Landmark, AMC, Regal and Alamo all on board for this release, as well as top art
See full article at IF.com.au »

Jennifer Kent: ‘The Nightingale’ Explores the ‘Epidemic’ of Rape Around the World

Jennifer Kent: ‘The Nightingale’ Explores the ‘Epidemic’ of Rape Around the World
When Jennifer Kent’s first feature, “The Babadook,” premiered at Sundance, she was greeted as the year’s breakout auteur. In the fall of 2018, when “The Nightingale” premiered in Venice, she faced a very different reaction.

“It was awful,” the Australian director said, reflecting on the experience a year later. “My gender overtook my film. It still mystifies me.”

As the only woman director in Venice’s competition, Kent faced a harsh response to her movie that overwhelmed the work itself. And “The Nightingale” deserves better: Like “The Babadook,” it’s a mesmerizing immersion into one woman’s broken life, and her capacity to wrestle control of it. But in other ways, it’s a dramatic expansion of her talent, confronting the country’s centuries of racism and misogyny through a visceral lens, and the ultimate mission statement from a filmmaker who could have easily been devoured by the Hollywood machine.
See full article at Indiewire »

Jennifer Kent on Shooting The Nightingale One-Camera, Contractually Obligated Aspect Ratios and Directing from A Handheld Monitor

Australian filmmaker Jennifer Kent’s first two movies present different parental nightmares. In The Babadook, a mother’s fear that she doesn’t love her son manifests itself in the form of the titular monster. In her latest, The Nightingale, a young woman explores the extremes she’s willing to go to in order to punish someone who’s harmed her child. Set in the early 1800s, The Nightingale stars Aisling Franciosi as Clare, an Irish prisoner finishing out the final days of her sentence in servitude to brutal British soldier Hawkins (Sam Claflin). When Hawkins rapes her and attacks her family, Clare sets out […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Jennifer Kent on Shooting The Nightingale One-Camera, Contractually Obligated Aspect Ratios and Directing from A Handheld Monitor

Australian filmmaker Jennifer Kent’s first two movies present different parental nightmares. In The Babadook, a mother’s fear that she doesn’t love her son manifests itself in the form of the titular monster. In her latest, The Nightingale, a young woman explores the extremes she’s willing to go to in order to punish someone who’s harmed her child. Set in the early 1800s, The Nightingale stars Aisling Franciosi as Clare, an Irish prisoner finishing out the final days of her sentence in servitude to brutal British soldier Hawkins (Sam Claflin). When Hawkins rapes her and attacks her family, Clare sets out […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘The Nightingale’ Director Jennifer Kent Calls Out ‘Unconscious Bias’ Over Violent Rape Scenes

In an interview with TheWrap, Jennifer Kent wonders whether the violent imagery and rape scenes in her film “The Nightingale” would receive the same level of scrutiny if it was directed by a man.

Following “The Nightingale’s” Australian premiere in Sydney this June, The Telegraph and Australia’s News.com.au reported that several moviegoers walked out of the theater, quoting one woman as saying, “She’s already been raped, we don’t need to see it again.” Kent told TheWrap reports of mass walkouts were “exaggerated,” and she said that shortly after such reports surfaced, she watched a string of recent films all directed by men, all of them more violent than “The Nightingale,” but none that received backlash.

“And so I thought, hang on, what is this? What’s going on? I can’t help but think there is some unconscious bias in regards to what a
See full article at The Wrap »

‘The Nightingale’ Film Review: ‘Babadook’ Director Packs a Wallop in Bleak Revenge Tale

  • The Wrap
‘The Nightingale’ Film Review: ‘Babadook’ Director Packs a Wallop in Bleak Revenge Tale
There are almost no movies that come with a content warning about sexual assault. Jennifer Kent’s haunting new film “The Nightingale” does, and it’s a warning not to be taken lightly.

For those us of who use trigger warnings to navigate life, it’s sometimes better to be mentally prepared for the horrors depicted in the film. Set up a self-care plan in place ahead of nightmares or panic attacks it might bring up, or decide for your health’s sake that this film is better watched at another time in the safety of your home or perhaps not at all. What’s important for some viewers is that these warnings restore control to those who may have had it taken away.

It’s in that spirit (and the wishes of the film’s distributor) that I won’t go into some of the more visceral details of
See full article at The Wrap »
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