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Chimerica's Cherry Jones: 'Everything progressive in America has been trampled on'

Jones has played nuns, poets and even the Us president in 24 ... while working with problematic men. ‘If we condemn by instinct, we’re on a slippery slope,’ she says

The American, high-culture audience will know Cherry Jones as an icon of Broadway, high priestess of off-Broadway, giving definitive performances since the 1980s: famously, Sister Aloysius in Doubt and Amanda Wingfield in The Glass Menagerie, a Tennessee Williams play she describes with such persuasive, feeling admiration that I bought it on the way home.

Dedicated consumers of schlock will be catapulted back to Jones’s President Allison Taylor, from series seven of 24. While the box-set connoisseur will know Jones from Transparent, in which she played Leslie Mackinaw, closely modelled on creator Jill Soloway’s partner, the poet Eileen Myles. Jones says with ridiculous modesty that she usually gets parts at the last minute, when someone else pulls out. “I always like to find out who,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Chimerica's Cherry Jones: 'Everything progressive in America has been trampled on'

Jones has played nuns, poets and even the Us president in 24 ... while working with problematic men. ‘If we condemn by instinct, we’re on a slippery slope,’ she says

The American, high-culture audience will know Cherry Jones as an icon of Broadway, high priestess of off-Broadway, giving definitive performances since the 1980s: famously, Sister Aloysius in Doubt and Amanda Wingfield in The Glass Menagerie, a Tennessee Williams play she describes with such persuasive, feeling admiration that I bought it on the way home.

Dedicated consumers of schlock will be catapulted back to Jones’s President Allison Taylor, from series seven of 24. While the box-set connoisseur will know Jones from Transparent, in which she played Leslie Mackinaw, closely modelled on creator Jill Soloway’s partner, the poet Eileen Myles. Jones says with ridiculous modesty that she usually gets parts at the last minute, when someone else pulls out. “I always like to find out who,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

"Togetherness feels like a sensible way forward": An Interview with Beatrice Gibson

  • MUBI
I Hope I'm Loud When I'm DeadIn "Crone Music," her largest exhibition so far, Franco-British artist and filmmaker Beatrice Gibson presented two new films, I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead and Deux Soeurs Qui Ne Sont Pas Soeurs ("Two Sisters Who Are Not Sisters"), in London’s Camden Arts Centre, along with many other side programs related to expanded cinema, poetry and music. As in her previous works, for which she received numerous accolades, including two Tiger awards for best short film at the International Rotterdam Film Festival, in her new films she explores the nature of communal work in the artistic process and the politics of friendship. Usually shot on analogue film, her work was for this occasion transferred to digital and projected in two gallery spaces on impressive screens that occupied the whole wall of the galleries. The third gallery, whose interior was for this reason designed by Dominic Cullinan,
See full article at MUBI »

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