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‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical’ Announces North American Tour; New Orleans, Chicago Top Itinerary

  • Deadline
Moulin Rouge! The Musical, one of the biggest Broadway hits in recent seasons, will take its hits on the road next year, with tech rehearsals for the first North American tour premiering in November at New Orleans’ Saenger Theatre before settling into a 10-week run at Chicago’s James M. Nederlander Theatre.

Additional tour stops, on-sale dates and casting will be announced later.

“After ten years in development, the fantastic response to Moulin Rouge! The Musical in New York is mind blowing,” said producer Carmen Pavlovic. “We’re keen to share the enthusiasm for Moulin Rouge! The Musical across the country. It’s thrilling that a second company will be going out to audiences across North America just one year after the Broadway opening.”

Directed by Alex Timbers, Moulin Rouge! utilizes a jukebox-worth of hit pop songs old and new, the tunes peppering a book by John Logan. Choreography is by Sonya Tayeh,
See full article at Deadline »

‘Rent: Live’ Production Designer Jason Sherwood Aims To Bring Deeper Sense Of Immersion To Live TV Musical Format

  • Deadline
A 30-year-old production designer hailing from the world of New York theater, Jason Sherwood entered the world of television just last year, and has already racked up his first Emmy nomination, for his contributions to Rent: Live.

Interning for Derek McLane—the production designer behind The Sound of Music Live!—at a time when the live TV musical format was just beginning to making a resurgence, Sherwood was “obsessed with the idea that a musical was going to be given a mainstream platform in that way,” he told Deadline recently. Following the way in which the form was approached with each new take, Sherwood was impressed, though he couldn’t shake the idea that there was something missing from those efforts. “I thought those first couple were beautiful,” he says, “but didn’t necessarily embrace the idea of their own live-ness.”

“I know that my experience of watching a concert,
See full article at Deadline »

Broadway’s Roundabout Sets ‘A Soldier’s Play’ With Blair Underwood & David Alan Grier and Tony Kushner’s ‘Caroline, Or Change’ Revival For 2020

A Broadway revival of the Tony Kushner-Jeanine Tesori musical Caroline, Or Change and a Broadway premiere of Off Broadway’s seminal A Soldier’s Play, starring David Alan Grier and Blair Underwood, are set for 2020 opening nights in Roundabout Theatre Company productions.

Caroline, Or Change, last on Broadway in 2004, will star Sharon D. Clarke, reprising as the title character direct from her Olivier Award-winning West End production performance.

Both Soldier and Caroline were announced today by Roundabout. The productions will close out the theater company’s 2019-20 season.

First up will be Charles Fuller’s A Soldier’s Play, directed by Kenny Leon (American Son) and beginning previews December 27, 2019 for a limited engagement at the Roundabout’s American Airlines Theatre. Official opening is January 21, 2020.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning A Soldier’s Play premiered Off-Broadway in 1981 at the Negro Ensemble Company with an acclaimed cast that included Adolph Caesar, Denzel Washington and Grier,
See full article at Deadline »

‘Almost Famous’ Musical Sets Cast (Exclusive)

  • Variety
‘Almost Famous’ Musical Sets Cast (Exclusive)
“Almost Famous,” a new musical based on the Oscar-winning film, has lined up its creative team and cast.

The show, which will kick off the 2019-2020 Season at the Old Globe, will include Colin Donnell as rock star Russell Hammond, Casey Likes as teenage journalist William Miller, and Solea Pfeiffer as groupie Penny Lane. The show features a book and lyrics by Cameron Crowe, the movie’s writer and director. Crowe based the story on his own experience as a young writer for Rolling Stone and how he came-of-age while following a promising band that was on the verge of breaking into the big time.

Likes is a 17-year-old who will make his professional theater debut with the pivotal role, serving as a stage surrogate for Crowe.

The rest of the cast includes Drew Gehling as Jeff Bebe, Anika Larsen as Elaine Miller, Robert Colletti as Lester Bangs, Matt Bittner as Larry Fellows,
See full article at Variety »

‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical’ Review: All You Need Is Love Songs By The Dozens

Even the most wholly original works of art can, in the service of story or character or heart, summon the stray memory, the whispery chill of déjà vu. They’ll switch on the bittersweet recall of better times or drip-drop echoey little splashes of the worst. Most, though, remember to turn the damn spigot off.

Watching Broadway’s truly lovely-looking, golden-oldie-stuffed Moulin Rouge! The Musical, opening tonight, I was reminded time and time (and time) again not only of life’s circumstances when this or that hit song first caught our shared attention, but of Moulin‘s spiritual predecessor. I thought of Baz Luhrmann’s 2001 movie, too, but the predecessor that never escaped my mind was Name That Tune, the old game show in which contestants vied to be the first to recognize a song in as few notes as possible.

Directed by Alex Timbers, whose stage credits include the transcendent and the okay (Beetlejuice), Moulin Rouge! both adheres to, and expands upon, Luhrmann’s dazzling, hyper-stylish film starring Ewan McGregor and Nicole Kidman. The plot and setting are the same: We’re in fin-de-siècle Paris (1899 and Montmartre to be exact), inside the legendary nightclub of the title.

Actually, legendary might be a tad premature – a mere 10 years into its extant existence, the tales of debauched, defiant Bohemians of many and varied stripes are just taking root. The club is hot hot hot, but broke.

Not that you’d know by looking at it. In the miracle-working hands of scenic designer Derek McLane, Broadway’s Al Hirschfeld Theatre is transformed into a red velvet heart-shaped fever dream, a gloriously naughty, gender-mucked Valentine from a last-gasp Victorian Era. Costume designer Catherine Zuber matches the mood with the sort of flashy divine decadence undergarments-as-outer that we’ve come to expect after so many Cabaret revivals, but few will begrudge the familiarity. Dazzle is dazzle, never more so than when Sonya Tayeh is choreographing with a kitchen sink approach that encompasses can-can, Fosse and Single Ladies.

We’ll take it on faith that this nightclub has to sell itself to a devilish Duke.

At least, that’s the plan dreamed up by Harold (a couldn’t be better Danny Burstein), the leering emcee of this cabaret, er, nightclub who conspires with his star performer/courtesan and longtime from-the-streets pal Satine (Karen Olivio) to give the rich and vicious-by-reputation Duke of Monroth (Tam Mutu) whatever he wants, and whenever he wants it.

The complication is Christian – sometimes the show is just that literal – a naive young and very poor composer from Ohio (where else? what else?) who has come for a slice of La Vie Boheme and finds it straight off. He meets artist Toulouse-Lautrec (Sahr Ngaujah) and Argentinian gigolo Santiago (Ricky Rojas) and, through them, the Moulin Rouge and Satine.

There’s a mix-up/meet-cute involving the Duke, Christian (Aaron Tveit) and Satine, but identities are sorted soon enough, and before you can say “my dad has a barn” the gang is planning a new musical that will save the club, revolutionize the art form, provide Christian with the recognition he deserves and make a star of Satine.

At least, that’s how it should go. But the Duke’s wallet comes with a string attached to Satine, who now must dump Christian lest he wind up face down in the Seine. Oh, and Satine only has a week or so to live, her countdown tick-tocked by the size of the rouge splotch on her white hanky.

Plotwise, that’s pretty much it. John Logan’s book adds no big (or small) surprises and little emotion – what genuine feeling graces Moulin Rouge comes via the likes of Elton John and Bernie Taupin, when a “Your Song” pushes the exact button intended. Both Tveit and Olivo are wonderful singers and fine actors, but neither can bring much depth to these stock stage musical characters.

Olivo makes a better go of it, partly because Timbers and Logan have given her a rawer Satine than Luhrmann gave Kidman. This survivor is no porcelain doll, and if her backstory of child prostitution and sisterhood of the streets seems a bit tacked on, well, a character needs notes to hit just as much as any singer does.

Still, even the best of these character flourishes begin to feel like also-ran ideas running to catch up with what must have been the founding concept for this adaptation: the cover songs. The term “jukebox musical” is often one of disparagement, but rarely has it felt more appropriate. What seemed like a clever little motif in the film – having late 19th Century bohos strutting to “Lady Marmalade” or jamming to T. Rex – here becomes the raison d’être. The movie’s original soundtrack lists 17 songs, nearly all cover versions of hits, and though a few numbers in the movie were left off the record, even the second volume couldn’t combine to match the 70 (!) songs of the stage version.

Granted, most of those are more snippet than song, which is either good or bad, I suppose, depending on whether your era of choice got much snipping. While the movie leaned, aurally at least, on ’70s nostalgia, the stage production updates with Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, OutKast, Britney Spears, Beyonce, the White Stripes, Florence and the Machine, Seal, Adele, Sia and whoever sang “Shut Up + Dance.”

Good, catchy songs, no disputing that, whether you favor “Bad Romance” or “What’s Love Got To Do With It,” “Chandelier” or “The Sound of Music.” And certainly the track listing itself can be fun in a guess-what’s-next, parlor-game sort of way, at least initially. Wears thin fast, though, certainly by the time we get to the end of the overlong first act where we’re met with what’s been called the “Elephant Love Medley” since the movie.

Performed by Satine and Christian in her elephant-shaped dressing room, the medley strings together what begins to feel like every love song ever written. Here’s the list, courtesy of Playbill: “All You Need is Love/Love is Just a Game/I Was Made for Loving You/Just One Night/Pride (In the Name of Love)/Can’t Help Falling In Love/Don’t You Want Me/Don’t Speak/I Love You Always Forever/It Ain’t Me Babe/Love Hurts/Love is a Battlefield/Play the Game/Such Great Heights/Torn/Take On Me/Fidelity/What’s Love Got To Do with It/Everlasting Love/Up Where We Belong/Heroes/I Will Always Love You).”

The something-for-everyone approach has its advantages – not least a steady stream of applause and recognition chuckles that make Moulin Rouge! feel like one of the liveliest shows on Broadway. With box office soaring), this reportedly $28 million enterprise will swat away any stray critical brickbats like so many gnats.

But I don’t think I’ll be the only one leaning more toward grimace than grin. There’s another bit of nostalgia detritus that drifted across my mind during

“Elephant Love Medley,” and if you can’t manage my recommended Hadestown or Tootsie to see musicals with genuine heart, take another route and search YouTube for the Cher and David Bowie duet from 1975’s The Cher Show. It’s a classic of its type called “Young Americans Medley,” featuring the two icons (one coked to his different-colored eyeballs) performing a musical daisy-chain. “Song sung blue/everybody knows one/Is the loneliest number…” You can fast-forward when you’ve had enough.
See full article at Deadline »

Photo Flash: Al Hirschfeld Theatre Transforms Into the Moulin Rouge!

The highly anticipated new musical Moulin Rouge The Musical will begin performances tomorrow, Friday, June 28 on Broadway at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre ahead of a July 25 opening night. The company has been busy transforming the theatre into the Moulin Rouge and Jujamcyn Theatres' Jordan Roth is giving a sneak peek of Derek McLane's incredible scenic design. Check it out below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

‘Burn This’ Review: Adam Driver, Keri Russell Simmer In Broadway’s Spar Wars

Can a play lie in wait? Let’s say it can so we can say that it has: Lanford Wilson’s Burn This has been lurking about since 1987 anticipating the arrival of Adam Driver, and for that match-up alone the years haven’t been wasted.

But that match-up alone is very nearly all we get in Michael Mayer’s Broadway revival opening tonight at the Hudson Theatre. And that’s pretty odd, since the production’s other match-up – Driver and his fellow Star Wars: Episode IX compatriot Keri Russell – is the major selling point here, a teaming that’s been scorching subway walls since steamy ads began cropping up earlier this winter.

To say that Burn This hasn’t aged particularly well since ’87 is rather like pointing out a lopsided old house with a badly built foundation needs a paint job – true enough, maybe, but almost beside the point. Burn
See full article at Deadline »

The Hasty Pudding Institute of 1770 To Honor Marc Anthony With the Order of the Golden Sphinx

Today, the Hasty Pudding Institute of 1770 announced that six-time Grammy and Latin Grammy award winner Marc Anthony will be honored and presented with the 2019 Order of the Golden Sphinx award at the 7th Annual Order of the Golden Sphinx Gala at the Pierre in New York City on April 15, 2019.

The Order of the Golden Sphinx, named for a traditional symbol of the Hasty Pudding Institute, is the highest honor bestowed by the Institute, and recognizes individuals in the entertainment industry for their extraordinary contributions to the performing arts. The recipient represents the Institute’s mission to support and foster the performing arts within its membership at Harvard and the community at large.

Previous recipients of the Order of the Golden Sphinx award include Michael Lynton, Chairman of Snap, Inc. and former CEO of Sony Entertainment; David Heyman, producer of Gravity and the Harry Potter film universe; Clive Davis, legendary music
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Fiona Crombie wins Art Directors Guild Award

The Favourite’ (Photo credit: 20th Century Fox)

Aussie production designer Fiona Crombie’s chances of winning her first Academy Award have received a boost after her work on Yorgos LanthimosThe Favourite was recognised by the Art Directors Guild.

The Favourite won the prize for best period film at the guild’s Excellence in Production Design Awards on Saturday at the InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown.

Black Panther was named best fantasy film while Crazy Rich Asians took the prize for contemporary film and Isle of Dogs best animated film. The key TV awards went to The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and The Handmaid’s Tale.

In the past five years the winner of the guild’s period film category went on to win the Oscar in production design three times: For The Great Gatsby (2014), The Grand Budapest Hotel (2015) and The Shape of Water (2018), which also won best picture.

The production design
See full article at IF.com.au »

Art Directors Guild Awards Spread the Love to ‘Black Panther,’ ‘The Favourite,’ and ‘Crazy Rich Asians’

The Art Directors Guild Production Design Awards spread the wealth throughout 11 categories of film, television, commercials, music videos, and animated features. Feature film winners included period “The Favourite” (Fiona Crombie), fantasy “Black Panther” (Hannah Beachler), contemporary “Crazy Rich Asians” (Nelson Coates), and animated “Isle of Dogs”.

Anyone looking for clarity on the upcoming Academy Awards won’t get it here. Beachler, the Oscar favorite, for her brilliant world building of Wakanda, has already become the first African-American to be Oscar-nominated in her craft. A victory, though, would solidify the diversity breakthrough for production design.

Meanwhile, a win for Crombie would signify a stunning creative achievement. She transformed the palace (shot at Hatfield House) into a playground and battlefield with a lot of open spaces. The wood paneling and tapestries helped the pale-skinned actresses stand out more, especially with Sandy Powell’s Oscar-nominated monochrome costumes.

Television winners included “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Art Directors Guild Awards Spread the Love to ‘Black Panther,’ ‘The Favourite,’ and ‘Crazy Rich Asians’

  • Indiewire
The Art Directors Guild Production Design Awards spread the wealth throughout 11 categories of film, television, commercials, music videos, and animated features. Feature film winners included period “The Favourite” (Fiona Crombie), fantasy “Black Panther” (Hannah Beachler), contemporary “Crazy Rich Asians” (Nelson Coates), and animated “Isle of Dogs”.

Anyone looking for clarity on the upcoming Academy Awards won’t get it here. Beachler, the Oscar favorite, for her brilliant world building of Wakanda, has already become the first African-American to be Oscar-nominated in her craft. A victory, though, would solidify the diversity breakthrough for production design.

Meanwhile, a win for Crombie would signify a stunning creative achievement. She transformed the palace (shot at Hatfield House) into a playground and battlefield with a lot of open spaces. The wood paneling and tapestries helped the pale-skinned actresses stand out more, especially with Sandy Powell’s Oscar-nominated monochrome costumes.

Television winners included “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Black Panther,’ ‘The Favourite’ Among Winners at Art Directors Guild Awards

  • The Wrap
‘Black Panther,’ ‘The Favourite’ Among Winners at Art Directors Guild Awards
The Favourite”, “Crazy Rich Asians” and “Black Panther” have been named the best-designed films of 2018 by the Art Directors Guild, which handed out its 23rd annual Excellence in Production Design Awards on Saturday night at the Intercontinental Los Angeles Downtown.

The Favourite” won in the Period Film category, “Black Panther” in the Fantasy Film category and “Crazy Rich Asians” in the Contemporary Film category. “Isle of Dogs” won in the Animated Film category, as the Adg picked a separate winner from the Annie Awards, which gave its art direction prize to “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” the same night.

In the 22 years that the Adg has been handing out awards, one of its winners has gone on to win the Oscar for Best Production Design 15 times, including the last five years in a row. Most of the Oscar winners have come from the Adg’s period-film category.

Also Read: 'The Favourite': Oscar-Nominated Editor,
See full article at The Wrap »

Adg Awards: ‘Black Panther’, ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Take Home Trophies For Film, ‘Mrs. Maisel’ Honored For TV – Full Winners List

  • Deadline
Adg Awards: ‘Black Panther’, ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Take Home Trophies For Film, ‘Mrs. Maisel’ Honored For TV – Full Winners List
The trophies for the 23rd Annual Art Directors Guild Awards were handed out on Saturday night at the InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown with two of the most game-changing inclusive films of the year Black Panther and Crazy Rich Asians taking home awards for film and The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and The Handmaid’s Tale winning for TV.

Hosted by David Alan Grier, the annual award ceremony honors excellence in production design in film and television. Among the special honorees were Academy Award-winning filmmaker Rob Marshall who received the Adg Cinematic Imagery Award as well as Lifetime Achievement Award recipients that included Production Designer Jeannine Oppewall, Senior Illustrator and Production Designer Ed Verreaux, Scenic Artist Jim Fiorito and Set Designer and Art Director William F. Matthews.

Amanda N’Duka was on the scene at the ceremony. The night was light and not weighed down with the usual stress and political-driven speeches from regular award ceremonies.
See full article at Deadline »

‘The Favourite,’ ‘Black Panther,’ ‘Mrs. Maisel’ Among Art Directors Guild Winners

  • Variety
‘The Favourite,’ ‘Black Panther,’ ‘Mrs. Maisel’ Among Art Directors Guild Winners
The Favourite,” “Black Panther” and “Crazy Rich Asians” walked away with top film honors at the 23rd annual Art Directors Guild Awards Saturday night.

“This journey started six years ago with ‘Fruitvale Station’ and a very awkward Skype interview,” Hannach Beachler, production designer of “Black Panther,” said in thanking director Ryan Coogler. “This journey has altered my life … Just learning about who I am and what I want this film to be, and really pushing the idea that design is not just brick and mortar. It’s not just wax, it’s not just paint. It’s your heart, it’s your soul, it’s everything we do every single day.”

In the TV fields, “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “Glow” and “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” were among the winners.

Oscar-nominated production designer Jeannine Oppewall and Adg-nominated production designer Ed Verreaux (“Jurassic Park”) received lifetime achievement awards from the organization.

“I
See full article at Variety »

Broadway’s ‘Burn This’ Rounds Out Cast, Sets Opening Date

  • Deadline
Next spring’s Broadway revival of Lanford Wilson’s Burn This starring Adam Driver and Keri Russell has completed casting and set an April 16 opening date at the Hudson Theatre.

Previews begin March 15, with Tony Award nominees David Furr and Brandon Uranowitz rounding out the four-member cast, says producer David Binder. Michael Mayer will direct, with the design team including Derek McLane (Sets), Clint Ramos (Costumes) and Natasha Katz (Lights).

Burn This, which originated Off Broadway in 1987 before transferring to Broadway in an acclaimed production starring John Malkovich and Joan Allen, is set in a downtown Manhattan loft in the 1980s, as four New Yorkers are brought together after a funeral. Driver and Russell play the brother and the roommate, respectively, of the deceased.

Furr will play Burton, the longtime lover of Russell’s Anna. Tony nominated for his performance in the 2016 Noises Off revival, Furr has also appeared on Broadway in Accent On Youth,
See full article at Deadline »

‘Moulin Rouge!’ Stage Production Headed to Broadway July 2019

  • The Wrap
‘Moulin Rouge!’ Stage Production Headed to Broadway July 2019
The stage production of Baz Luhrmann’s “Moulin Rouge!” that opened in Boston this summer is heading to Broadway.

Producer Carmen Pavlovic announced Monday that the musical will open on Broadway at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre, with previews beginning June 28, 2019 prior to a July 25 opening night.

The cast from the show at Boston’s Emerson Colonial Theatre will transfer to Broadway, including Karen Olivo, Aaron Tveit, Danny Burstein, Sahr Ngaujah, Tam Mutu, Ricky Rojas and Robyn Hurder.

Also Read: 'Moulin Rouge!': Watch Aaron Tveit Channel Ewan McGregor in Broadway-Bound Musical (Video)

“We are thrilled to be bringing ‘Moulin Rouge! The Musical’ to Broadway,” said producer Carmen Pavlovic in a statement. “We are especially delighted that the show is going to the Hirschfeld – the perfect theater for this production with its lavish architecture and rich history of landmark Broadway shows.”

Based on the Oscar-nominated 2001 film of the same name
See full article at The Wrap »

‘American Son’: Will Kerry Washington score first Tony nom for ‘high tension’ topical drama?

Almost a decade after her Broadway debut, Kerry Washington has returned to the boards in an explosive new drama “American Son,” which opened at the Booth Theatre on November 4. Washington leads a quartet of actors that also includes Steven Pasquale, Tony nominee Jeremy Jordan (“Newsies”) and Eugene Lee.

Written by Broadway freshman Christopher Demos-Brown and directed by Tony-winner Kenny Leon, “American Son” unfolds in real time in a police station in Miami, Florida at 4:00am. Kendra (Washington) waits for any news about her missing 18 year-old son Jamal from Office Paul Larkin (Jordan), who seems reluctant to share any details without the Lieutenant (Lee) present, or until Kendra’s estranged husband Scott (Pasquale) arrives.

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Critics were divided on this searing exploration of race in contemporary American society. On the positive side, Jesse Green (New York Times) gives “American Son
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmy-Nominated Production Designer Unveils Secrets Behind 90th Oscars Set

Designing the sets for Hollywood's biggest night of the year — the 90th Academy Awards, which aired March 4 live on ABC from the Dolby Theatre — started with a brief from show producers Jennifer Todd and Michael De Luca for "something big and grand."

Says production designer Derek McLane, who is Emmy-nominated, with his team, for best production design for a variety special: "They also wanted something that celebrated a number of generations of moviemaking. So the show tried to capture different eras of filmmaking from the recent past to the early days of the ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Broadway Review: ‘Gettin’ The Band Back Together’

  • Variety
Producer Ken Davenport has racked up an impressive collection of Tony Award nominations (and a couple of wins) for shows like “Once on This Island,” “Kinky Boots,” and “Spring Awakening.” But co-writing the book (with improv comedy group the Grundleshotz) for “Gettin’ The Band Back Together,” a musical about a 40-year-old Jersey boy who realizes his dream of starting a rock ‘n’ roll band, was surely a singular labor of love. At a recent preview, Davenport actually got up on stage before the show to tell us so, getting a big laugh by sharing the information that his Barry Manilow high-school tribute band called itself “The Barely Manilows.”

The writer-producer’s affection comes through in the show, which opens, appropriately enough, with a song called “Jersey.” “Perfect beaches and snow-capped hills / It’s like New York but you can pay your bills,” sing the hard-working chorus boys and girls, amusingly
See full article at Variety »

Broadway’s ‘Gettin’ The Band Back Together’ Cranks Up Jukebox Hero Pipe Dreams: Review

Middle-age urges to re-live old garage band pipe dreams are typically best kept to dank basements and sound-proofed garages, and Broadway’s Gettin’ The Band Back Together doesn’t exactly prove otherwise. Still, the playful musical is more infectious than you might expect.

Be warned, though: Enjoyment of Gettin’ The Band Back Together will be in direct proportion to a tolerance for not-so-young guys making guitar faces and devil horn hand gestures for two and a half hours.

The rock musical, which opens tonight at the Belasco Theatre, is an intentionally over-the-top tale in which newly jobless 40-year-old Manhattan stockbroker Mitch Papadopoulos (Mitchell Jarvas) moves back in with his New Jersey mom (Marilu Henner), meets up with old high school buddies, reunites with the girl who got away and, of course, lives out the musical’s title to win a local Battle of the Bands. Various homes are at stake,
See full article at Deadline »
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