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Netflix’s ‘Our Planet’ Roars to Life With Work by Top Wildlife Cinematographers

  • Variety
In terms of scope, production time and — very likely — budget, Netflix’s “Our Planet” is one of the most ambitious projects from the streaming service to date. Narrated by David Attenborough and made available worldwide on April 5, the goal of the eight-part series is to capture diverse habitats across the globe and highlight the struggles of local wildlife as animals try to cope with climate change that threatens their existence.

To accompany the show, Netflix and the wildlife production company Silverback Films worked in tandem with the World Wildlife Fund to create an interactive website where viewers can watch added content and discover ways to help the cause of environmentalism.

The pricy project was filmed over four years in 50 countries, capturing tens of thousands of hours of footage in roughly 3,500 filming days from 600 photographers and filmmakers using some of the world’s most technologically advanced camera systems. Out of that massive crew,
See full article at Variety »

How Brett Morgen’s Team Gave Jane Goodall’s Memories Life by Building a Film From 1,500 Hours of Silent Footage

  • Indiewire
Editor’s Note: This article is presented in partnership with National Geographic Documentary Films’ Jane. Learn more about the film here.

There have been plenty of documentaries about Jane Goodall, but none that look like “Jane”—which is probably because the National Geographic film was compiled from hundreds of hours of original footage of the legendary primatologist on her journeys to study chimpanzees in Africa in the 1960s.

That meant director Brett Morgen and editor Joe Beshenkovsky had to sort through 1,500 hours of film — most of which was composed of silent, random shots by Goodall’s eventual husband, the famed wildlife photographer Hugo Van Lawick, that he captured while documenting Goodall’s study in Gombe from 1962-66.

But the two managed to compile a 90-minute film, scored by Philip Glass, that tells the story of Goodall’s research, her love story with Van Lawick, the early years of her son,
See full article at Indiewire »

Shortlist for Oscars® Nominated Docu Features

Shortlist for Oscars® Nominated Docu Features
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced that 15 films in the Documentary Feature category will advance in the voting process for the 90th Academy Awards®. One hundred seventy films were originally submitted in the category.

The 15 films are listed below in alphabetical order by title, with their production companies:

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail, Mitten Media, Motto Pictures, Kartemquin Educational Films and Wgbh/Frontline.

Director Steve James

A small financial institution called Abacus becomes the only company criminally indicted in the wake of the United States’ 2008 mortgage crisis.

Chasing Coral, Exposure Labs in partnership with The Ocean Agency & View Into the Blue in association with Argent Pictures & The Kendeda Fund. Directed by Jeff Orlowski

Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. A team of divers, photographers and scientists set out on a thrilling ocean adventure to discover why and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Jane documentary review: “girl” does a science, changes the world

MaryAnn’s quick take… Combines new insight from famed primatologist Jane Goodall on her early work with astonishing vintage footage to craft a portrait that is simple yet profound. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for movies about women; big animal lover

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

In 1960, paleontologist Louis Leakey did something remarkable: He hired a 26-year-old secretary, untrained in the sciences and without a university degree in any field at all, to go into the wilds of Tanzania and study chimps. Jane Goodall is now, at age 83, one of the most renowned figures in primatology, and arguably one of the most famous scientists living today (maybe to ever have lived), one of those rare superstars of science whose work has captured the imagination of the general public. But at the time, she knew nothing about wild chimps.
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Jane review – wondrous footage lights up Goodall's Tarzan dream

Jane Goodall’s research into chimp behaviour was a great leap forward in scientific research and this documentary does her work full justice

Here is a portrait of the primatologist as a young woman. Using footage only recently rediscovered in the National Geographic archive, octogenarian Jane Goodall recollects her first field study of chimpanzees in the wild in Tanzania. This was the 1960s, and Goodall was a 26-year-old typist with no academic training. Yet on that trip she made a great leap in scientific research by observing chimps making and using tools. Goodall says that it was her mother who built her self-esteem when she was growing up – encouraging her to see beyond the expectations that a nice, middle-class girl from Bournemouth should get married and start a family. Instead, she dreamed of living with animals in the jungle like Tarzan. There are more than 40 documentaries about Goodall. What makes
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Brett Morgen On Directing ‘Jane’ & Jane Goodall’s Love Story With Hugo van Lawick [Video Exclusive]

  • Uinterview
Director Brett Morgen worked with National Geographic to offer an incredible new look at scientist Jane Goodall. The company found over one hundred hours of previously-unseen footage of Goodall’s work in Africa, and decided to make a new documentary about it with Morgen directing. “I was out on the road promoting a movie about Kurt Cobain called Montage […]

Source: uInterview

The post Brett Morgen On Directing ‘Jane’ & Jane Goodall’s Love Story With Hugo van Lawick [Video Exclusive] appeared first on uInterview.
See full article at Uinterview »

7 Great Documentaries About Remarkable Women, From ‘What Happened, Miss Simone?’ to ‘The Beaches of Agnes’

7 Great Documentaries About Remarkable Women, From ‘What Happened, Miss Simone?’ to ‘The Beaches of Agnes’
Two of the world’s most influential women — pioneering primatologist Jane Goodall and lauded writer Joan Didion — are both on the receiving end of insightful new documentaries this year, both of which are hitting screens in the coming weeks. Brett Morgen’s “Jane” (which opened just last week to deservedly rave reviews) tracks the early years of Goodall’s work in Tanzania’s Gombe Stream National Park, combining both new interviews with the still-trailblazing scientist and early footage lensed by her former husband Hugo van Lawick (a celebrated animal photographer) to tell a full-bodied story about Goddall’s amazing ethic and her tremendous empathy for the animals she’s made the center of her life.

This week, Griffin Dunne’s look at Didion’s life, “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” will arrive on Netflix, following her own early years and her current state as a literary icon. Both
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: ‘Jane’ is a Breathtaking Documentary that Serves as a Cautionary Tale

Even though now it’s almost impossible to think of a world in which Jane Goodall isn’t the preeminent primatologist, her notorious career could’ve been thwarted due to sexism. As a 27-year-old secretary with no college education, she “struck gold” when paleontologist Louis Leakey chose her to conduct research on chimpanzees in Tanzania. Leakey was looking for a fresh mind, unbiased by scientific knowledge, and Jane happened to be at the right place at the right time. More than five decades have passed since Goodall left for Africa and revolutionized the study of primates, and while her astonishing career and scientific breakthroughs are rightfully celebrated in Brett Morgen’s documentary Jane, more than being a standard biographical doc, the film serves as a cautionary tale against the perils of male chauvinism.

Early in the film we learn from Jane that growing up she used to dream as a man,
See full article at The Film Stage »

How 'Jane' Captures the Legendary Primatologist – In Her Own Words

How 'Jane' Captures the Legendary Primatologist – In Her Own Words
Long before he became acquainted with the subject of his documentary Jane, Brett Morgen assumed that the primatologist Jane Goodall was a "goody two-shoe[s]." The filmmaker was used to tackling figures with pronounced dark sides like Hollywood producer Robert Evans and Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain, not the type of scientific icons children study in grade school. "You were like Mother Teresa," he says, addressing Goodall, sitting on the couch beside him. She shoots back: "You didn't know me then."

Goodall, 83, may have a wry deadpan wit and seems to delight in skewering Morgen,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Jane – Review

Jane Goodall in Jane. Photo by Hugo van Lawick. © National Geographic

In 1957, famed anthropologist Louis Leakey chose three young women to study the great apes in the wild, as a way to understand early man. To study, gorillas, he picked Dian Fossey, for orangutans, he picked Birute Galdikas, and to study chimpanzees, he chose Jane Goodall.

It was Jane Goodall who first captured the public imagination, in part through a National Geographic film highlighting the groundbreaking work of this blonde, slim, pretty young English woman living among with chimps. While news reports spoke breathlessly about the bravery of this young English woman alone in the wild, the fact was that living in African and studying animals had been Jane Goodall’s childhood dream. And she wasn’t alone: she took her intrepid middle-aged mother with her.

These are among the startling surprises revealed in the delightful documentary Jane, which is
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Among the apes by Anne-Katrin Titze

Jane Goodall with Jane director Brett Morgen: "I'm no longer in love with Tarzan." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Brett Morgen's Jane, a New York Film Festival Spotlight on Documentary highlight will screen in the Doc NYC Short List programme next month. At the Soho House lunch in New York for Jane yesterday afternoon, I spoke with the director about the footage shot by Hugo van Lawick and at the post-screening Q&A, moderated by Eric Kohn, I asked Jane Goodall where she stood today with Dr Doolittle and Tarzan, her childhood heroes.

Dr Louis Leakey's secretary, a 26-year-old woman with no science degree, but great patience and an even greater love of animals, was sent to Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania in 1960 to get as close to the local wild chimpanzees as humanly possible. Jane Goodall did get phenomenally close and Brett Morgen's documentary, assembled mainly from
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Lff Review: Brett Morgen's 'Jane' Documentary is Sublime & Inspiring

Oh my do I love this documentary. It's as close to perfection as any film can get, and it will fill you with hope and happiness. Jane is a documentary made by filmmaker Brett Morgen (of The Kid Stays in the Picture, Chicago 10, Cobain: Montage of Heck) that's about the groundbreaking work of animal lover and activist Jane Goodall. As we all know, Goodall went out in the jungles of Africa in the 1960s and 1970s and lived with chimpanzees, studying them and observing how closely related to humans they really are. They shot tons of footage of her, but most of it was lost for years, until it was found recently. Morgen and his crew went through thousands of hours of this old footage and created this wonderful film about Goodall, about her work, about chimpanzees, and about her relationship with photographer Hugo van Lawick. It is sublime.
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

‘Jane’ Is a Love Story Between a Woman and Her Vocation, Says Director Brett Morgen

‘Jane’ Is a Love Story Between a Woman and Her Vocation, Says Director Brett Morgen
Even Jane Goodall thought there have probably been enough documentaries made about her life and work. But when Brett Morgen and National Geographic came calling, she eventually agreed to participate in a movie using newly discovered footage of her trips to Gombe, Africa to study chimpanzees in the 1960s.

Jane,” which played as part of the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series in Los Angeles, not only spotlights Goodall’s early work, but it also tells the story of how she fell in love with her first husband, nature photographer Hugo van Lawick.

Read More:Jane Goodall’s Remarkable Career Gets a Much-Deserved Documentary in Revelatory ‘Jane’ — Tiff Review

“My version of this movie was the Garden of Eden,” said Morgen, the filmmaker also behind “Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck,” in a Q&A following the screening. “My premise was Gombe, at the very beginning when you first see it in the film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Trailer Watch: Jane Goodall Enters the Field and History Books in “Jane”

Jane

Day after day, in the sun and the rain and the wind, I climbed into the hills,” recalls Jane Goodall in the first trailer for “Jane.” “This is where I was meant to be. The more I learned, the more I realized how like us [chimps] were.” As the spot for the National Geographic documentary explains, “virtually nothing was known about chimps in the wild” until “one woman went to where no man dared to go.” London-born Goodall went all the way to Gombe, Tanzania to live among chimps in a National Park. By her own admission, Goodall had “no idea of their brutality.” But it wasn’t just the chimps the trailblazer was up against.

“There were some who had tried to discredit my observations because I was a young, untrained girl,” the famed anthropologist says.

“‘Jane’ is the story of how Jane Goodall became Jane Goodall,” the doc’s official synopsis promises. The Brett Morgen-directed film includes footage shot by Goodall’s future husband Hugo van Lawick in the 1960s that was previously thought to be lost. Her incredible, groundbreaking interactions with chimps have been intercut with interviews with her in the present-day.

The Un Messenger of Peace is the founder of The Jane Goodall Institute, a wildlife and environmental conservation organization.

Jane” made its world premiere earlier this month at the Toronto International Film Festival, where it received rapturous praise from critics. You can catch the film in theaters beginning October 20.

https://medium.com/media/94a34f721cabc782f14cac3af8287e68/href

Trailer Watch: Jane Goodall Enters the Field and History Books in “Jane” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Head to the Jungle in the First Trailer for Brett Morgen’s ‘Jane’

There’s been no shortage of Kurt Cobain documentaries, but Brett Morgen delivered one of the most bracingly personal and affecting with Montage of Heck a few years back. He’s now back with a look at the life of Jane Goodall, featuring a score by Philip Glass. Culled together from the 140 hours of 16mm footage that Hugo van Lawick captured of Goodall’s chimp interactions, as well as new interviews with the subject, it promises to be one of the most essential documentaries of the year.

Ahead of a stop by New York Film Festival and release later in October, National Geographic have now just released the first trailer, which takes a beautiful, fast-paced look at Goodall’s journey, including a peek at the aforementioned incredible footage. Check out the trailer below, which also includes a preview of Glass’ score.

Jane is the story of how Jane Goodall became
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Jane’ Trailer: Brett Morgen’s Acclaimed Jane Goodall Doc Has Adorable Monkeys, Which Is Really All You Need to Know — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Jane’ Trailer: Brett Morgen’s Acclaimed Jane Goodall Doc Has Adorable Monkeys, Which Is Really All You Need to Know — Watch
National Geographic has released the trailer for “Jane,” one of the most acclaimed documentaries of the Toronto International Film Festival — and potentially the year. Brett Morgen’s film about Jane Goodall was described by IndieWire’s Kate Erbland as “the definitive portrait of Goodall, one that is also remarkably accessible and almost unbearably tender.” Also, there are monkeys, so what are you waiting for?

Read More:Jane Goodall’s Remarkable Career Gets a Much-Deserved Documentary in Revelatory ‘Jane’ — Tiff Review

Here’s the synopsis: “‘Jane’ is the story of how Jane Goodall became Jane Goodall – using footage shot by future husband Hugo van Lawick of her first experiences in Gombe, Tanzania in the 1960s. Previously thought to be lost forever, the footage was only recently discovered in a storage unit, and has been now masterfully intercut with interviews of present day Jane Goodall to provide an in-depth portrait of her life.
See full article at Indiewire »

Jane Goodall’s Remarkable Career Gets a Much-Deserved Documentary in Revelatory ‘Jane’ — Tiff Review

  • Indiewire
Jane Goodall’s Remarkable Career Gets a Much-Deserved Documentary in Revelatory ‘Jane’ — Tiff Review
Brett Morgen’s revelatory “Jane” offers up contributions from a bounty of some of film’s finest working professionals, from the award-winning Morgen himself to composer Philip Glass and cinematographer Ellen Kuras, but the real star is reams of lauded wildlife photographer Hugo van Lawick’s pristine 16mm footage, following the early years of wildlife conservationist Jane Goodall, mostly set in her adopted home of Gombe, Tanzania. Well, the real star is Goodall (and her chimps, her accomplishments, and her passion, but mostly just the eponymous Jane), but the footage itself is a sterling testament to not just Goodall’s career, but also Morgen’s incredible eye and craftsmanship.

Gifted with so much raw material — and a cooperative Goodall, who offered up interviews and materials and necessary context at seemingly every turn — Morgen has made the definitive portrait of Goodall, one that is also remarkably accessible and almost unbearably tender.
See full article at Indiewire »

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist Gay Talese
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist
See full article at Indiewire »
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