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James Cromwell movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
James Cromwell movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Actor James Cromwell celebrates his 80th birthday on January 27, 2020. The actor has had a highly successful 45-year career in television and film. He won an Emmy Award in 2013 for his supporting role in the limited series “American Horror Story” and was nominated for an Oscar in 1995 for his role in “Babe.”

Cromwell first came to the public’s attention for his appearance on the wildly popular “All in the Family” in which he played the recurring character of Stretch Cunningham, a co-worker Archie Bunker. It was only his second television acting job (after an appearance on “The Rockford Files”) and it launched him to a highly steady career in guest appearances on television shows and occasional small movie roles.

That all changed for Cromwell when he appeared in “Babe” an Australian film telling the story of an orphaned baby pig who is raised by the sheep dogs on the farm where he lives.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Siskel and Ebert Really Hated Some Iconic 80s Horror Movies

  • MovieWeb
Siskel and Ebert Really Hated Some Iconic 80s Horror Movies
Siskel and Ebert really hated iconic 80s horror movies. A recently unearthed clip of the duo reviewing Halloween II heaps more evidence on the fact that they really weren't into the 80s slasher genre at all. Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel are icons in the world of movie criticism and it should be noted that they loved John Carpenter's original Halloween and wished that he would have been back to direct the sequel, as they both note in their review. It should also be noted that Halloween II is still a mixed bag, even for hardcore horror fans.

Appearing on their iconic show At the Movies, Gene Siskel begins the review of Halloween II by pointing out how much he didn't like it because of how predictable it was. Siskel went on to say that the sequel offers "nothing new" except for "repetitive" views of Michael Myers' "disgusting chalky face.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Megyn Kelly's Husband Calls Charlize Theron's Portrayal of Her 'a Little One Dimensional'

Megyn Kelly's Husband Calls Charlize Theron's Portrayal of Her 'a Little One Dimensional'
Megyn Kelly‘s husband is breaking his silence on Charlize Theron‘s portrayal of his wife in Bombshell.

In a round table interview, Kelly and husband Doug Brunt, joined her fellow former Fox colleagues — Juliet Huddy (former host of Fox News’ The Morning Show with Mike and Juliet), Rudi Bakhtiar (former Fox News reporter) and Julie Zann (former associate producer of Fox News Live) — to share their reactions on how the recently released movie Bombshell portrayed their real-life experiences with sexual harassment at the network.

The wide-ranging discussion was to allow the women to tell their own stories in their own words.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

X-massacre Double Feature: Silent Night, Deadly Night and Black Christmas This Weekend at The Des Peres Cinema – ‘Late Nite Grindhouse’

‘Late Nite Grindhouse’ film series, presented by Destroy the Brain continues this weekend! Head to the Marcus Des Peres Cinema this Friday and Saturday (December 6th and 7th) at 10pm for a double-bill of yuletide slasher essentials: Silent Night, Deadly Night and Black Christmas (the ’74 original!) Since this is a Marcus Theater, you may need to reserve your seats ahead of time Here. There may (or may not be) tickets available the nights of the screenings, but it never hurts to get them in advance! Tickets are $13 (technically $13.12 w/ tax). One ticket will get you in to both films.A Facebook invite for the event can be found Here

Silent Night, Deadly Night (1984)

“You scared, ain’t ya? You should be! Christmas Eve is the scariest damn night of the year!”

Silent Night, Deadly Night tells the tale of Billy Chapmen, orphaned at five after witnessing the murder of his
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

When Siskel and Ebert Defended 'Star Wars' After It Was Called Not Cinema

When Siskel and Ebert Defended 'Star Wars' After It Was Called Not Cinema
When Star Wars: Return of the Jedi hit theaters in 1983, it was a hit beloved by fans and even critics Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert — but it was also attacked for lacking cinematic integrity, much the same way Marvel films have been targeted as of late.

Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola sparked a debate ensnaring comic book fans and cinephiles the past few weeks when the Oscar-winning directors individually took shots at superhero films, critiquing their place as art within the industry. Superhero fans, along with those who have worked on Marvel films, pushed back on the remarks, making ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Roger Ebert's 1983 Take on Star Wars Movies Predicted the Future at Disney

  • MovieWeb
Roger Ebert's 1983 Take on Star Wars Movies Predicted the Future at Disney
Roger Ebert predicted the Disney takeover of Star Wars 29 years before Lucasfilm was all but consumed by the monolithic company. A lot has happened to the franchise in the past 7 years, but famed film critic Ebert talked about Star Wars being a perfect fit for Disney way before it became a reality.

A video from 1983 features Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert taking on fellow critic John Simon's harsh opinion on the Star Wars franchise. While Siskel and Ebert enjoy the world that George Lucas created, Simon absolutely hated it, proving that The Empire Strikes Back certainly had its critics upon release, much like the current trilogy, with The Last Jedi facing some very harsh reviews.

It would certainly be interesting to hear what Ebert thinks of the new Disney Star Wars takeover now that it's actually happened. Would he have given Solo and Rogue One a thumbs up? Perhaps he's
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bill Harris, Former 'At the Movies' Co-Host, Dies at 75

Bill Harris, the veteran Hollywood broadcast journalist who served as a co-host on the syndicated program At the Movies, has died. He was 75.

Harris died Thursday at the City of Hope hospital after a short bout with cancer, family spokesman Rusty Citron announced.

Harris was hired as one of the first reporters for Entertainment Tonight, which premiered in 1981, and he served as head writer/reviewer on Rona Barrett's gossip segments for the Today show and Good Morning America.

In 1986, Harris and New York critic Rex Reed assumed the aisle seats occupied by Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert on Tribune Broadcasting's ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Slideshow: Jon Favreau, Robert Downey Jr. Featured at 2019 Gene Siskel Film Center Gala

Previous | Image 1 of 4 | NextJon Favreau, recipent of the Siskel Center Renaissance Award.

Chicago – The annual Gene Siskel Film Center Gala – benefitting the cinema jewel of Chicago’s State Street – took place on June 15th, 2019, and packed some serious super heroism. Each year, the Center honors a special guest with their Renaissance Award, and the 2019 honor went to Jon Favreau. To interview the actor/director at the event was Robert Downey Jr., who just anchored Marvel Studios “Avengers: Endgame,” portraying Tony Stark/Iron Man.

Each year, the Siskel Center celebrates the art of film by honoring a filmmaker who advances the art of cinema. Past Renaissance Award honorees have included some of the most respected actors and directors working in the film industry today, such as Michael Mann, Nicole Kidman, George Lucas, Robert Downey Jr., Jamie Foxx, Reese Witherspoon, Gwyneth Paltrow, Morgan Freeman, Mark Ruffalo, Scarlett Johansson and Ethan Hawke.

“Jon
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Video Sundays: Cronenberg, Controversies, and "Crash"

In March, Viggo Mortensen and David Cronenberg participated in this delightful discussion following a screening of Crash at the Tiff (Toronto International Film Festival) Bell Lightbox. Released in 1996, Cronenberg's Crash (based on the novel by J.G. Ballard) follows a sleazy producer who joins a group of thrill-seekers whose particular fetish involves near-death, vehicular accidents with a streak of exhibitionism. Throughout the talk, Cronenberg shares his initial response of repulsion towards Ballard's clinical and humorless approach to such a "medical sensuality," and his sudden, impulsive decision to make the film. "I was more depressed by [Crash] than impressed," says Gene Siskel, in a heated debate with Roger Ebert during their show At the Movies. Siskel insists that the film is plainly idiotic; Ebert recognizes that the film is "too tough" for audiences to take, accusing Siskel of bringing no sympathy to Cronenberg's attempt to make "pornography without pornography." David Cronenberg on the
See full article at MUBI »

Review: The Hustle

by Samantha Craggs

The late great Gene Siskel had a litmus test: is this movie more interesting than a documentary of the same actors having lunch? In the case of Anne Hathaway and Rebel Wilson in The Hustle, the answer is a resounding no. The material keeps Hathaway at a fraction of her potential wattage, and Hollywood doesn't quite know what to do with Rebel Wilson yet.

The Hustle, in theatres now, is a remake of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, although the earlier film isn't required viewing. Hathaway plays Josephine Chesterfield, a skilled con artist with a too-affected British accent who uses her natural charm and willowy figure to swindle men out of money in a little French Riviera town. A police sergeant works with her – for a price, of course. And Chesterfield can pay it. She's made millions doing this.

In comes Wilson's Penny Rust, playing what we've come to
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Meeting Gorbachev’ Film Review: Werner Herzog Gets Up Close and Personal With Former Soviet Leader

  • The Wrap
‘Meeting Gorbachev’ Film Review: Werner Herzog Gets Up Close and Personal With Former Soviet Leader
As one watches Werner Herzog and André Singer’s documentary “Meeting Gorbachev,” the mind floats back to the words of the late Gene Siskel, the film critic who was known for, amongst other things, a hypothetical question he posed to filmmakers: “Is my film more interesting than a documentary of the same actors having lunch together?”

Meeting Gorbachev” is a film about Werner Herzog and Mikhail Gorbachev, the last president of the Soviet Union, having a series of three conversations, including one during which they enjoy fancy chocolates. It’s a conversation so deeply fascinating that there’s nothing else the filmmakers could have done to spice it up. Herzog and Gorbachev could have joined forces to halt an alien invasion and invent time travel, and it still wouldn’t have packed the same wallop.

Herzog narrates “Meeting Gorbachev,” which intercuts his interviews with documentary footage and historical context. If
See full article at The Wrap »

U.S. Trailer for Ash Mayfair’s Acclaimed Directorial Debut ‘The Third Wife’

With the hundreds of films premiering at the Toronto International Film Film Festival, one that stood out as among the finest was Ash Mayfair’s The Third Wife. Picked up by Film Movement, the period drama will now get a release next month and a new trailer has arrived for the occasion. Set in 19th century Vietnam, it follows a teenager who is forced into an arranged marriage and discovers a path of forbidden love that will test her freedom.

Jared Mobarak said in our review, “First-time feature writer/director Ash Mayfair introduces us to this world with a series of luxurious set-ups of varying length, sans dialogue to truly allow the environment to overtake our senses. The Third Wife‘s visual poetry shifts through its minimalistic progressions with pertinent information positioned at the frame’s center: an egg yolk running down May’s chest to her belly button, Hung
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘American Gods’ Season 2 Review: A Cosmic Mess

‘American Gods’ Season 2 Review: A Cosmic Mess
When the late, great critic Gene Siskel hated a movie, he’d say he wished the filmmakers had asked themselves, “Is my film more interesting than a documentary of the same actors having lunch together?” This question applies neatly to television as well. I’ve often sat through hilarious cast press conferences for sitcoms that had failed to make me so much as smile, and wondered how that energy couldn’t be properly harnessed when the cameras rolled.

A show as visually flashy and bug-nuts crazy as Starz’s American Gods (Sundays at 8 p.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

James Cromwell movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Babe,’ ‘L.A. Confidential,’ ‘The Queen’

  • Gold Derby
James Cromwell movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Babe,’ ‘L.A. Confidential,’ ‘The Queen’
Actor James Cromwell celebrates his 79th birthday on January 27, 2019. The actor has had a highly successful 45-year career in television and film. He won an Emmy Award in 2013 for his supporting role in the limited series “American Horror Story” and was nominated for an Oscar in 1995 for his role in “Babe.”

Cromwell first came to the public’s attention for his appearance on the wildly popular “All in the Family” in which he played the recurring character of Stretch Cunningham, a co-worker Archie Bunker. It was only his second television acting job (after an appearance on “The Rockford Files”) and it launched him to a highly steady career in guest appearances on television shows and occasional small movie roles.

SEEOscar Best Supporting Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

That all changed for Cromwell when he appeared in “Babe” an Australian film telling the story of an orphaned baby
See full article at Gold Derby »

Podtalk: Director Richard Yeagley Observes ‘The Sunday Sessions’

Chicago – The film ”Boy Erased” was released in November, a star-studded “based on real events” memoir film about the topic of “gay conversion therapy” (the rejected-by-the-medical-world notion of using techniques to convert a gay individual to straight). Director Richard Yeagley has produced a documentary on the same subject, “The Sunday Sessions,” which has more authenticity because it’s completely real. One more screening of the film will take place on January 16th, 2019, part of Gene Siskel Film Center’s “Stranger Than Fiction” series. Click here for tickets and details.

“The Sunday Sessions” is a searing fly-on-the-wall journey, that follows a young actor’s troubled two-year quest to change his sexual orientation. Although the practice is outlawed in many states, Nathan – a passionately committed Catholic in his late twenties – voluntarily submits to treatment by controversial therapist, a gay man who now boasts of a new heterosexual life that includes a wife and children.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

The Surprising Inspirations Behind Movie Character Names

Paul Bradshaw Nov 7, 2018

Annoy the wrong director and you could have an ugly cockroach man named after you.

This article comes from Den of Geek UK.

It’s not easy naming your movie characters. Do you go boring (James Bond), awesome (Snake Plissken), or just plain stupid? If you’re not picking names out of a phone book, you have to base them on something, or someone, and a surprising number of movie characters have been inspired by real people, pets and places.

Some of them are nice nods (who wouldn’t want their dad to write them into Star Wars?), but most of them definitely aren’t. The best revenge, it seems, is served up on the end credits…

The Eborsisk – Willow

George Lucas didn't really like film critics. When New Yorker writer Pauline Kael said watching Star Wars was “like taking a pack of kids to the circus,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Christopher Reeve — His Legacy As Superman And Beyond Lives On (Exclusive)

When considering that this week would have been Christopher Reeve's 66th birthday, we find ourselves reflecting on an interview he gave in which a reporter asked, “How do you define a hero?” Christopher considered the question a moment before responding. Finally he noted, “For me, personally, a hero is somebody who will make sacrifices for others without expecting a reward.” “Superman is all that,” mused the interviewer. “That’s what I try to play,” Christopher replied. Then came the biggie: “How about Christopher Reeve? Is he a hero?" The answer was an honest one. “I don’t know,” he said. “I can’t start leaping to those conclusions.” (Photo Credit: Warner Bros) Thankfully, the rest of the world can and did, given the global response to the actor’s passing on Oct. 10, 2004, nearly a decade after the horseback riding accident that paralyzed him from the neck down. Lesser men might have given up,
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Film News: Appearances by Patrick McDonald of HollywoodChicago.com, Sep. 8 & 9, 2018

Chicago – HollywoodChicago.com will be on the road in the Windy City this weekend, as Patrick McDonald (Editor and Film Writer) makes two appearances in different venues. The first will be a “Power Breakfast” sponsored by Women in Film Chicago, on the topic of “Giving and Receiving Feedback” at 10am September 8th, 2018, at Noisefloor Post Production House on Erie Street. For more details and tickets, click here.

Power Breakfast for Women in Film Chicago is September 8th, 2018

Photo credit: WIFChicago.org

The second appearance will be as moderator to a film Q&A, as the Gene Siskel Film Center on State Street welcomes filmmaker Bing Liu and his mentor/producer Gordon Quinn of Kartemquin Films on September 9th, 2018. Liu will be screening his amazing documentary “Minding the Gap.” In a comprehensive interview with HollywoodChicago.com, Liu outlined particulars of the filmmaker’s journey, and what seems to be a deceptively
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Peter Bart: Are Brit Auteurs Too Bonded In Franchises To Shock Us Anymore?

Peter Bart: Are Brit Auteurs Too Bonded In Franchises To Shock Us Anymore?
Danny Boyle’s abrupt exit last week from the new James Bond sequel upset many Bond fans, who now face a longer wait for Bond 25, but my own reaction was one of relief. Boyle is too interesting a filmmaker to be making franchises rather than films — the Bond business had already consumed another talented Brit, Sam Mendes, for a few years (Skyfall and Spectre). Bond is surely a damn good business (the last four iterations grossed over $3 billion worldwide) but, by and large, British filmmakers haven’t been creating the sort of truly and innovate fare that they contributed in years past.

I was reminded of this yesterday when I spoke at a 50th anniversary salute to Midnight Cowboy at the Coronado Island Film Festival. Screening Cowboy pinpointed that extraordinary mid-1960s moment when the Brits essentially annexed the film world. John Schlesinger’s movie created a sort of
See full article at Deadline »

Red-Carpet Interview: Gene Siskel Film Center Honors Ethan Hawke

Chicago – Ethan Hawke has made 2018 his year, and on June 7th the Gene Siskel Film Center of Chicago recognized his recent artistic achievements and his career by honoring him with their annual Renaissance Award. The event included a Red Carpet walk, and an on-stage talk with his friend, actor Vincent D’Onofrio.

Ethan Hawke got high praise for his performance in writer/director Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed,” which was released in May. He portrays the minister of a Christian church that is losing its congregation, except for a young married couple who seeks his counsel. Hawke is also behind the camera as director for “Blaze,” a biography of country singer Blaze Foley, set for release in July.

Ethan Hawke, Gene Siskel Film Center Renaissance Award Recipient, June 7, 2018

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck photo for HollywoodChicago.com

Hawke was born in Texas, but eventually relocated to New Jersey as a child.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »
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