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The Forgotten: The Talented Mssrs. Donner, Raphael & Bates

  • MUBI
Nothing But the Best (1964) signifies a turning point in the British new wave: a sudden flip from grim northern drama to swinging London archness, here under the controls of three masters of that tone.1. Frederic Raphael is best known for writing Two For the Road (impossibly arch) and Eyes Wide Shut (strange... very strange), and this film does have some kind of commonality with those: glamorous young people, sporty cars, hard-to-get-into parties in sprawling country houses... but in essence it's more like a glib black comedy version of The Talented Mr. Ripley. Raphael had previously adapted the source story (by American crime writer Stanley Ellin) as a TV play, and in expanding it for cinema he threw out the ironic twist of fate that dooms the murderous, social-climber anti-hero, perhaps seeing it as an old-fashioned harking-back to Kind Hearts and Coronets (whose ironic twist was imposed by the censor). Now
See full article at MUBI »

Stanley Donen Appreciation: From ‘Singin’ In The Rain’ To ‘Two For The Road’ A Dazzling Cinematic Legacy – Hammond

  • Deadline
Stanley Donen Appreciation: From ‘Singin’ In The Rain’ To ‘Two For The Road’ A Dazzling Cinematic Legacy – Hammond
It is interesting this Oscar weekend to reflect on the life and career of the great Stanley Donen who died today at the age of 94. For those nominated tomorrow night who end up losing, don’t despair and just think of Stanley Donen , the director behind the camera on Singin’ In The Rain, Seven Brides For Seven Brothers, On The Town, Damn Yankees, The Pajama Game, It’s Always Fair Weather, Royal Wedding, Indiscreet, Charade , Arabesque, Two For The Road, Funny Face, and so many more. He never got a single Academy Award nomination in his career, not one, yet he made so many movies that are the epitome of style , and virtually (with mentors like Gene Kelly in particular) helped to reinvent the movie musical before passing the baton to Bob Fosse ,Rob Marshall, and Damien Chazelle among others all clearly influenced by him in one way or another.
See full article at Deadline »

How Director Stanley Donen Made Stars Like Gene Kelly and Audrey Hepburn Shine Their Brightest

  • Variety
How Director Stanley Donen Made Stars Like Gene Kelly and Audrey Hepburn Shine Their Brightest
Some directors make their presence felt in every frame of their films, while others operate in service of the stories and the stars.

There is no such thing as an egoless director, but Stanley Donen, who died at age 94, made every effort to efface himself from the picture in order to let a film’s assets shine to their full potential. But even in so doing, he left an undeniable signature on his work — films that radiate with color, and music, and some of the most inventive choreography until Bob Fosse came along in the late ’60s.

While his work hasn’t necessarily been studied to the degree that Hitchcock’s and Hawks’ have, it was Donen who made it possible for Gene Kelly to splash and tap around the lamppost in “Singin’ in the Rain,” he enabled Fred Astaire to dance up the walls and across the ceiling in “Royal Wedding,
See full article at Variety »

Stanley Donen’s Oscar Speech Was an All-Time Classic — Watch

  • Indiewire
Stanley Donen’s Oscar Speech Was an All-Time Classic — Watch
Like a lot of great filmmakers, Stanley Donen never won a competitive Academy Award — or even got nominated for one. But the “Singin’ in the Rain” and “Charade” director, who died this morning at 94, did receive an honorary Oscar for Lifetime Achievement in 1998. Presented by Martin Scorsese, it was emblematic of Donen’s vibrant spirit — and, apropos of his career, featured a musical interlude.

“Marty, it’s backwards, I should be giving this to you, believe me. And I want to thank the Board of Governors for this cute little fella which to me looks titanic,” he said before launching into song (the Titanic reference was a nod to how this was the night James Cameron’s film would win 11 Oscars). “Tonight, words seem inadequate. In musicals that’s when we do a song, so…”

Then he sang:

“Heaven, I’m in heaven,

and my heart beats so that I can hardly speak,
See full article at Indiewire »

50th Anniversary: Two for the Road

Tim here. This week marks the fiftieth anniversary of one of the tiny gems in the careers of Audrey Hepburn, Albert Finney, and director Stanley Donen: Two for the Road. It's a British film that picked up a handful of important awards nominations – writer Frederic Raphael at both the Oscars and Baftas, Hepburn at the Golden Globes, Donen with the DGA – and went on to be largely overlooked in the following five decades.

That's understandable; it's not a film primed to appeal to the fandom that it seems like it should have. Donen in the director's seat and Hepburn as the top-billed lead both suggest certain kinds of films, if not necessarily the same kind of film: bubbly comedies in his case, elegant Continental romances in hers (splitting the difference, four years earlier they collaborated on Charade, a bubbly Continental comedy). Two for the Road isn't devoid of humor,
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Forgotten: Stanley Donen's "Arabesque" (1966)

  • MUBI
In a sense, Arabesque (1966) is a sort of warmed-over rehash of Donen's earlier Charade (1963), which was a really nifty mock-Hitchcockian comedy thriller with Audrey Hepburn and Cary Grant. The later film stars Gregory Peck, who's no Grant, and Sophia Loren, who isn't Hepburn but is Loren—which ain't nothing.Donen was reputedly highly unhappy with the script, despite being the movie's producer, and his cinematographer Christopher Challis records him saying that their only hope was to present the story in as stylish and eccentric a manner as possible: this, for the most part, they do. (A pretty-well identical tale is told of Sidney J. Furie and The Ipcress File, and the result is similar in each case: a pop-art expressionist fairyland London in which everyone is or might be a spy or double or treble agent.)The opening scene, in which George Coulouris is murdered at the optician with poisoned eyedrops,
See full article at MUBI »

Two for the Road

Two for the Road

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 111 min. / Street Date January 10, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Audrey Hepburn, Albert Finney, Eleanor Bron, William Daniels, Claude Dauphin, Nadia Gray

Cinematography: Christopher Challis

Art Direction: Marc Frederic, Willy Holt

Film Editor: Madeleine Gug

Original Music: Henry Mancini

Written by Frederic Raphael

Produced and Directed by Stanley Donen

Some so-called sophisticated ‘sixties romantic dramas have dated pretty badly, as it’s not easy to create a movie acceptable to a fickle audience, that doesn’t end up with attitudes, politics or even costumes that don’t look ‘wrong’ just a few years later. I’ve found that enjoying Audrey Hepburn’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s takes a conscious act of selective blindness. The music, the style, the images were swooningly vital to an audience perhaps ten years older than this reviewer. Hepburn’s ravishing Holly Golightly misses
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Dekalog

Krzysztof Kieślowski's magnum opus for Polish Television is a transcendent 'cycle' of moral tales, each based on one of the Ten Commandments. But sometimes it's difficult to get the connection -- these brilliant mini-movies are pretty tricky. Dekalog Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 837 1988 / Color / 1:33 flat full frame; 1:70 widescreen / 583 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date September 27, 2016 / 99.95 Starring Aleksander Bardini, Janusz Gajos, Krystyna Janda, Bugoslaw Linda, Daniel Olbrychski many others. Cinematography Witold Adamek, Jacek Blawut, Slavomir Idziak, Andrzej Jaroszewicz, Edward Klosinski, Dariusz Kuc, Krzysztof Pakulski, Piotr Sobocinski, Wieslaw Zdort Film Editor Ewa Smal Original Music Zbigniew Preisner Written by Krzysztof Kieślowski, Krzysztof Plesiewicz Produced by Ryszard Chutkowski Directed by Krzysztof Kieślowski

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Back in the early 1990s I believe my first access to Polish director Krzystof Kieślowski was a laserdisc of his film The Double Life of Veronique. I also remember a big reaction in 1996 when
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Why 'Eyes Wide Shut' Is a Bizarro Holiday Classic

Once upon a time, Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman were supposed to be Jewish.

Bill and Alice Harford, the decidedly gentile married couple that the actors portrayed in 1999's Eyes Wide Shut, are about as kosher as a bacon milkshake. But when Stanley Kubrick first conceived of adapting Arthur Schnitzler's 1926 novella Traumnovelle in the Seventies, the filmmaker allegedly envisioned the male lead as Woody Allen, a man so Jewish that Shabbat practically observes him.

Kubrick's initial casting idea, which is all but inconceivable to anyone who's seen the finished film,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Daily | Screening the Past + More

The new issue of Screening the Past features articles on Béla Tarr's Damnation, Robert Altman, Barbara Stanwyck, Otto Preminger and costume designer Edith Head. Also in today's roundup: The films besides Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo that inform Christian Petzold's Phoenix; more discussion of David Foster Wallace and The End of the Tour; Frederick Raphael's memoir; Jonathan Rosenbaum's conversation with Jim Jarmusch about Dead Man; Xavier Dolan on Tom at the Farm; Jacques Rivette revivals on both sides of the Atlantic; a Vittorio De Sica retrospective; Yasujiro Ozu's Tokyo Story tops a list of the best of Asian cinema; and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Screening the Past + More

The new issue of Screening the Past features articles on Béla Tarr's Damnation, Robert Altman, Barbara Stanwyck, Otto Preminger and costume designer Edith Head. Also in today's roundup: The films besides Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo that inform Christian Petzold's Phoenix; more discussion of David Foster Wallace and The End of the Tour; Frederick Raphael's memoir; Jonathan Rosenbaum's conversation with Jim Jarmusch about Dead Man; Xavier Dolan on Tom at the Farm; Jacques Rivette revivals on both sides of the Atlantic; a Vittorio De Sica retrospective; Yasujiro Ozu's Tokyo Story tops a list of the best of Asian cinema; and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Masters of Cinema Cast – Episode 41 – Two for the Road

It’s summer time so why not go on a road trip? Well unless of course you want to spend the whole time bickering and trying to work out why your relationship slowly unraveling; Stanley Donen’s Two for the Road is this week’s film as well as an in-depth look at how relationships fail.

From Masters of Cinema:

One of the great fims by Stanley Donen (Singin’ in the Rain, Charade) after the studio era had come to a close, Two for the Road was a break-off with the old system, one which allowed Donen to further stretch his art, aided by screenwriter Frederic Raphael (Stanley Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut), in this tale of a couple voluntarily stretching themselves through the long period of their relationship.

Portrayed in fragments that span the couple’s time together in marriage, Two for the Road runs the course of a
See full article at CriterionCast »

Fortitude to sell This Man, This Woma

  • ScreenDaily
Fortitude to sell This Man, This Woma
Efm: Penelope Cruz and Diane Kruger are in final talks to star in the romance from Isabel Coixet, whose Nobody Wants The Night will open the Berlinale next week.

Fortitude International will finance the film as the year-old company moves into its second phase of aggressively backing original productions.

Co-founders Nadine de Barros, Robert Ogden Barnum and Daniel Wagner made the announcement on Wednesday (January 28) with This Man, This Woman producer Mike Lobell.

Frederic Raphael has written the screenplay to the story about a love triangle involving a man and woman who meet on a plane and a female talk show host who changes the course of their relationship.

Lobell produces his passion project while De Barros and Barnum serve as executive producers. Coixet is pictured.

CAA represents Us rights.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Casting Net: Penelope Cruz, Diane Kruger sign on for 'This Man, This Woman'

Casting Net: Penelope Cruz, Diane Kruger sign on for 'This Man, This Woman'
Penelope Cruz and Diane Kruger are in final negotiations for This Man, This Woman. Isabel Coixet is directing from a script by Frederic Raphael. The story follows Matt Heller and Martha Parks (Cruz), a former romantic item who look back on their roller coaster past when they run into each other on a plane. Kruger takes the role of a talk show host, Kirsty Sachs, who has an affair with Heller, and alters his relationship with Parks as a result. [Deadline] • Geoffrey Rush will star as Lionel Bart in Vadim Jean's musical feature, Consider Yourself. Bart was a composer and
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

'This Man, This Woman' Teams Penelope Cruz & Diane Kruger

'This Man, This Woman' Teams Penelope Cruz & Diane Kruger
Oscar winner Pen&#233lope Cruz (Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides) and Diane Kruger (Inglorious Basterds, National Treasure) are in final negotiations to star in the romance feature film This Man, This Woman, to be directed by Isabel Coixet whose new film Nobody Wants the Night opens the 2015 Berlin International Film Festival, it was announced today by Fortitude International co-founders, Nadine DeBarros and Robert Ogden Barnum, and producer Mike Lobell (The Freshman, Striptease).

Fortitude International is financing the film and will handle foreign sales on the project being introduced to buyers at the European Film Market in Berlin next month. De Barros and Barnum serve as executive producers. Lobell is producing the film. The romance is written by Oscar winner Frederic Raphael (Eyes Wide Shut, Darling, Two for the Road). CAA is representing domestic rights.

An estranged man, Matt Heller, and a woman, Martha Parks (Cruz
See full article at MovieWeb »

Penelope Cruz and Diane Kruger In Final Negotiations to Star in This Man, This Woman

Oscar winner Penelope Cruz (Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides) and Diane Kruger (Inglorious Basterds, National Treasure) are in final negotiations to star in the romance feature film This Man, This Woman, to be directed by Isabel Coixet whose new film Nobody Wants The Night opens the 2015 Berlin International Film Festival, it was announced today by Fortitude International co-founders, Nadine de Barros and Robert Ogden Barnum, and producer Mike Lobell (The Freshman, Striptease).

Fortitude International is financing the film and will handle foreign sales on the project being introduced to buyers at the European Film Market in Berlin next month.

De Barros and Barnum serve as executive producers. Lobell is producing the film.

The romance is written by Oscar winner Frederic Raphael (Eyes Wide Shut, Darling, Two For The Road).

CAA is representing domestic rights.

An estranged man, Matt Heller, and a woman, Martha Parks (Cruz
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cruz, Kruger Join "This Man, This Woman"

Penelope Cruz and Diane Kruger are in final talks to star in Isabel Coixet's "This Man, This Woman" at Fortitude International.

Frederic Raphael ("Eyes Wide Shut") penned the script about an estranged man, Matt Heller, and a woman, Martha Parks (Cruz) who encounter each other by chance on a plane and relive memories of their turbulent romantic relationship.

Kruger will play Kirsty Sachs, a talk show host who has an affair with Heller and changes the course of his whirlwind relationship with Parks. The male lead is expected to be cast very soon.

Robert Ogden Barnum, Mike Lobell and Nadine de Barros will produce.

Source: Deadline
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Fortitude to sell This Man, This Woman

  • ScreenDaily
Fortitude to sell This Man, This Woman
Efm: Penelope Cruz and Diane Kruger are in final talks to star in the romance from Isabel Coixet, whose Nobody Wants The Night will open the Berlinale next week.

Fortitude International will commence pre-sales at the Efm next week and is financing the film as the one-year-old company moves into its second phase of aggressively backing original productions.

Co-founders Nadine de Barros, Robert Ogden Barnum and Daniel Wagner made the announcement on Wednesday (January 28) with This Man, This Woman producer Mike Lobell.

Frederic Raphael has written the screenplay to the story about a love triangle involving a man and woman who meet on a plane and a female talk show host who changes the course of their relationship.

Lobell is producing his passion project while De Barros and Barnum serve as executive producers. Coixet is pictured.

CAA represents Us rights.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: Stanley Donen's Two For The Road

Smart, stylish, insightful and brimming with technical inventiveness, Stanley Donen's Two For The Road is a wonderful examination of the modern marriage whose influence can still be felt in Hollywood cinema today, nearly 50 years after it was originally released.Inspired in part by his own marriage, screenwriter Frederic Raphael (Darling, Eyes Wide Shut) penned Two For The Road at the specific request of director Stanley Donen (Singing In The Rain, Charade), after seeing his earlier efforts in 1964's Nothing But The Best. According to Raphael, he deliberately wrote the script in random order, accentuating its episodic structure, as it revisits the various trips from London to the South of France by the same British couple.Mark Wallace (Albert Finney), a successful architect, and his wife Joanna...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Maximilian Schell obituary

Actor and director who brought dark good looks and a commanding presence to his roles

Austrian by birth, Swiss by circumstance and international by reputation, Maximilian Schell, who has died aged 83, was a distinguished actor, director, writer and producer. However, he will be best remembered as an actor, especially for his Oscar-winning performance in Stanley Kramer's Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) – an early highlight among scores of television and movie appearances. He also directed opera, worked tirelessly in the theatre and made six feature films, including Marlene (1984) - a tantalising portrait of Dietrich, his co-star in Judgment, who is heard being interviewed but not seen, except in movie extracts.

Schell courted controversy and much of his work, including The Pedestrian (1973), dealt with the second world war, its attendant crimes and the notion of collective guilt. In 1990, when he was offered a special award for his contributions to German film, he refused to accept it.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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