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Shared humanity by Anne-Katrin Titze

Shawn Snyder on Matthew Broderick as Albert and Géza Röhrig as Shmuel in To Dust: "The existential condition unites us all, and loss. It's a way that we despite our differences can see our shared humanity." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

At last year's Tribeca Film Festival, jurors Zosia Mamet, Joshua Leonard and Josh Charles awarded Shawn Snyder the New Narrative Director Competition prize and the Tribeca filmgoers agreed, voting To Dust the Audience Award.

Professor Armstrong (Paul Newman) and the farmer's wife (Carolyn Conwell) stuffing Gromek (Wolfgang Kieling) into the oven in Alfred Hitchcock's Torn Curtain

After speaking with Géza Röhrig, who co-stars with Matthew Broderick in Shawn's début feature, which he co-wrote with Jason Begue, the director and I connected two Alfred Hitchcock films: The Trouble With Harry for Edmund Gwenn, Mildred Natwick, Shirley MacLaine, and John Forsythe, and a scene from Torn Curtain where Paul Newman as Professor Armstrong and the farmer's wife,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Close-Up on Alfred Hitchcock's "The Trouble with Harry"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Alfred Hitchcock's The Trouble with Harry (1955) is showing from September 16 – October 16, 2018 in many countries around the world as part of the series Alfred Hitchcock: A Ticking Bomb.The illustrated opening credits of The Trouble with Harry, featuring cartoonish countryside drawings designed by Saul Steinberg, conclude on an amusingly lifeless body, a crudely sketched frame lying horizontal and rigid and looking quite at peace. When the film proper begins, shots of vibrant fall hues drench rolling Vermont hills in shades of similarly pastoral tranquility. In spots, the multicolored leaves have fallen indiscriminately to the ground. In one spot, there is the more conspicuous corpse of ill-fated Harry Worp (Philip Truex). In what might be the most overtly humorous camera angle of his career, director Alfred Hitchcock positions the image at ground level, leaving Harry’s feet thrust forward in the frame,
See full article at MUBI »

Neil Simon At The Movies: Why This Comedic Genius Deserved More Respect From Hollywood – An Appreciation

  • Deadline
Neil Simon At The Movies:  Why This Comedic Genius Deserved More Respect From Hollywood – An Appreciation
It is ironic that Neil Simon, who died today at 91, got his inspiration to become a comedy writer from the movies into which he constantly escaped to forget the circumstances of his poor depression-era childhood. Even though he grew up in Washington Heights, much closer to Broadway than Hollywood, it was always the movies of the likes of Chaplin , Keaton and others that stuck with him and led to one of the most sterling careers ever for a writer. Yet by far his greatest success and appreciation came as one of the most successful playwrights of all time, a record of accomplishment that included a whopping 17 Tony nominations and three wins, a Pulitizer Prize for drama, and even as the rare playwright to have a theatre named after him. “I always feel more like a writer when I’m writing a play because of the tradition of the theater … there
See full article at Deadline »

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century
Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

TCM's Pride Month Series Continues with Movies Somehow Connected to Lgbt Talent

Turner Classic Movies continues with its Gay Hollywood presentations tonight and tomorrow morning, June 8–9. Seven movies will be shown about, featuring, directed, or produced by the following: Cole Porter, Lorenz Hart, Farley Granger, John Dall, Edmund Goulding, W. Somerset Maughan, Clifton Webb, Montgomery Clift, Raymond Burr, Charles Walters, DeWitt Bodeen, and Harriet Parsons. (One assumes that it's a mere coincidence that gay rumor subjects Cary Grant and Tyrone Power are also featured.) Night and Day (1946), which could also be considered part of TCM's homage to birthday girl Alexis Smith, who would have turned 96 today, is a Cole Porter biopic starring Cary Grant as a posh, heterosexualized version of Porter. As the warning goes, any similaries to real-life people and/or events found in Night and Day are a mere coincidence. The same goes for Words and Music (1948), a highly fictionalized version of the Richard Rodgers-Lorenz Hart musical partnership.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Robert Redford and Jane Fonda are Barefoot In The Park Saturday Morning at The Hi-Pointe

“Paul, I think I’m gonna be a lousy wife. But don’t be angry with me. I love you very much – and I’m very sexy!”

Barefoot In The Park screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, February 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

Romantic comedies don’t come much lighter than Barefoot In The Park, an early Neil Simon confection based on the early days of his first marriage. The youthful, fresh-faced pair of Robert Redford and Jane Fonda play Paul and Corie Bratter, hot-to-trot newlyweds who after spending seven passion-filled nights at the Plaza, find the everyday trials and tribulations of marriage rather rough going. Corie has secured them a sixth-floor walk-up
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Top 21 Non-Traditional Christmas Movies To Watch

As we head into the holiday season, Wamg brings you our list of the Best Non-Traditional Christmas Movies to watch after the Holiday ham, pretty presents, and multiple viewings of White Christmas, Home Alone and Miracle On 34th Street are a thing of Christmas Past.

Our choices are filled snarky mistletoe carnage and crafty comedy – Geek style. Santa Claus is coming to town in these “More Naughty Than Nice”. films.

We’ve made a list and checked it twice with our lineup of not just the 20 Best holiday films but the Top 21 Non-Traditional Christmas Movies. After the success of Krampus, we just had to add it!

We kick off our list with our Honorable Mention –

Jingle All The Way

Christmas; It’s the most magical time of the year. High powered businessman Howard Langston (Arnold Schwarzenegger), is hard at work taking last-minute orders from customers to whom he just can
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

John Ford puts a Technicolor sheen on Monument Valley in this second cavalry picture with John Wayne, who does some of his most professional acting work. Joanne Dru plays coy, while the real star is rodeo wizard Ben Johnson and the dazzling cinematography of Winton C. Hoch. She Wore a Yellow Ribbon Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1949 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 103 min. / Street Date June 7, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring John Wayne, Joanne Dru, John Agar, Ben Johnson, Harry Carey Jr., Victor McLaglen, Mildred Natwick, George O'Brien, Chief John Big Tree. Cinematography Winton Hoch Art Direction James Basevi Film Editor Jack Murray Original Music Richard Hageman Written by Frank Nugent, Laurence Stallings from the stories War Party and The Big Hunt by James Warner Bellah Produced by Merian C. Cooper, John Ford Directed by John Ford

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Have you never seen real 3-Strip Technicolor used for terrific outdoor photography?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Cummings Pt.3: Gender-Bending from Joan of Arc to Comic Farce, Liberal Supporter of Political Refugees

'Saint Joan': Constance Cummings as the George Bernard Shaw heroine. Constance Cummings on stage: From sex-change farce and Emma Bovary to Juliet and 'Saint Joan' (See previous post: “Constance Cummings: Frank Capra, Mae West and Columbia Lawsuit.”) In the mid-1930s, Constance Cummings landed the title roles in two of husband Benn W. Levy's stage adaptations: Levy and Hubert Griffith's Young Madame Conti (1936), starring Cummings as a demimondaine who falls in love with a villainous character. She ends up killing him – or does she? Adapted from Bruno Frank's German-language original, Young Madame Conti was presented on both sides of the Atlantic; on Broadway, it had a brief run in spring 1937 at the Music Box Theatre. Based on the Gustave Flaubert novel, the Theatre Guild-produced Madame Bovary (1937) was staged in late fall at Broadway's Broadhurst Theatre. Referring to the London production of Young Madame Conti, The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Top Screenwriting Team from the Golden Age of Hollywood: List of Movies and Academy Award nominations

Billy Wilder directed Sunset Blvd. with Gloria Swanson and William Holden. Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett movies Below is a list of movies on which Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder worked together as screenwriters, including efforts for which they did not receive screen credit. The Wilder-Brackett screenwriting partnership lasted from 1938 to 1949. During that time, they shared two Academy Awards for their work on The Lost Weekend (1945) and, with D.M. Marshman Jr., Sunset Blvd. (1950). More detailed information further below. Post-split years Billy Wilder would later join forces with screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond in movies such as the classic comedy Some Like It Hot (1959), the Best Picture Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), and One Two Three (1961), notable as James Cagney's last film (until a brief comeback in Milos Forman's Ragtime two decades later). Although some of these movies were quite well received, Wilder's later efforts – which also included The Seven Year Itch
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Top 20 Non-Traditional Christmas Movies

Last year Wamg brought you our list of the 15 Best Non-Traditional Christmas Movies to watch after the Holiday ham, pretty presents, and multiple viewings of White Christmas, Home Alone and Miracle On 34th Street were a thing of Christmas Past.

Minus the warm and fuzzy, our choices are filled snarky mistletoe carnage and crafty comedy – Geek style.

We made a list and checked it twice with our new lineup of the Top 20 Non-Traditional Christmas Movies. You better believe that Santa Claus is coming to town in these “More Naughty Than Nice”. films.

We kick off our list with our Honorable Mention -

Jingle All The Way

Christmas; It’s the most magical time of the year. High powered businessman Howard Langston (Arnold Schwarzenegger), is hard at work taking last-minute orders from customers to whom he just can’t say no; like his son, Jamie (Jake Lloyd), asking for the hottest
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

2002 Movie About Film Decomposition Included Among National Film Registry's 2013 Inductees

Gilda,’ ‘Pulp Fiction’: 2013 National Film Registry movies (photo: Rita Hayworth in ‘Gilda’) See previous post: “‘Mary Poppins’ in National Film Registry: Good Timing for Disney’s ‘Saving Mr. Banks.’” Billy Woodberry’s UCLA thesis film Bless Their Little Hearts (1984). Stanton Kaye’s Brandy in the Wilderness (1969). The Film Group’s Cicero March (1966), about a Civil Rights march in an all-white Chicago suburb. Norbert A. Myles’ Daughter of Dawn (1920), with Hunting Horse, Oscar Yellow Wolf, Esther Labarre. Bill Morrison’s Decasia (2002), featuring decomposing archival footage. Alfred E. Green’s Ella Cinders (1926), with Colleen Moore, Lloyd Hughes, Vera Lewis. Fred M. Wilcox’s Forbidden Planet (1956), with Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen, Warren Stevens, Jack Kelly, Robby the Robot. Charles Vidor’s Gilda (1946), with Rita Hayworth, Glenn Ford, George Macready. John and Faith Hubley’s Oscar-winning animated short The Hole (1962). Stanley Kramer’s Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), with Best Actor Oscar winner Maximilian Schell,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Top 15 Non-Traditional Christmas Movies

Now that you’ve had your fill of peppermint, presents, and multiple viewings of AMC’s White Christmas and Miracle On 34th Street, how about a little snark to go along with that special Holiday movie – sans the warm and fuzzy. It’s time for some mistletoe carnage and crafty comedy Geek style. In our gift to you, Wamg presents our list of the 15 best non-traditional films. Lovers of It’S A Wonderful Life can consider yourselves excused cuz Santa Claus is coming to town in these “More Naughty Than Nice”. movies.

Black Christmas

Black Christmas (the 1974 version of course), generally acknowledged as the forerunner of the ‘slasher’. genre, is so graphic in its imagination that you don’t even need to see any gore or murder. Black Christmas, which holds up spectacularly well after almost 40 years, tells the tale of a group of sorority sisters that are hounded and
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Trouble With Harry: Hitchcock's lost masterpiece

It flopped disastrously, nearly killed Hitchcock and has been scorned for decades. But it's time The Trouble With Harry was recognised as a surrealist masterpiece

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On October 12 1954, Alfred Hitchcock was shooting on location in Morrisville, Vermont, when the overhead bracket supporting a VistaVision camera snapped. Weighing 850lb – the same as a car – the camera unit dropped through the air, swiped the director's shoulder and rolled over, pinning a crew member briefly to the ground. It was the nearest the master himself came to violent death: just a few inches to the side and it would have smashed that unmistakable domed head like a peach and provided cinema theorists with any number of irresistible, macabre metaphors. Hitchcock calmly ordered filming to continue with a replacement camera. Later he packed up, however, declaring himself unsatisfied with the weather in Vermont, and moved the shoot
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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