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No Flamenco at the 2019 Latin Grammys, Says Academy President

Bad news for flamenco fans: as of 2019, the Latin Grammy category for Best Flamenco Album has been discontinued.

According to Latin Recording Academy President and CEO Gabriel Abaroa, it wasn’t the ongoing discourse surrounding Spanish artists that sparked the Academy’s decision. “The Latin Recording Academy follows a strict Awards process,” he told Billboard on Thursday. “One of the rules that applies is that at least 25 approved recordings must be submitted each year.” According to the report, Universal Music Spain had submitted 10 qualifying new recordings; it was not confirmed
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Review: The First Desire—Pedro Almodóvar’s “Pain and Glory”

  • MUBI
Pedro Almodóvar’s is a cinema of misfits, for misfits. It’s a generous, cacophonous and brightly-colored universe that’s sought—over the course of a glorious, four-decade-plus career—to make a place for everyone, including and especially those relegated to society’s margins. His humanist and sensitive eye has zeroed in on women’s experience as well as those of homosexuals, drag queens and transgender people—reckoning with their plight (in the case of the latter in particular) long before they found a place in mainstream debate. It is also a cinema steeped in auto-fiction, crisscrossing between truth an artifice, where melodramas are laced with rich autobiographical details—his 2004 masterwork Bad Education remains possibly the most notable case in point. But even as they draw from real life fodder, Almodóvar’s films do not register as confessionals, and labelling them so would be to miss the point. Their beauty
See full article at MUBI »

Kisses from the baby by Anne-Katrin Titze

Olivier Assayas, Penélope Cruz, Édgar Ramírez, and producer Rodrigo Teixeira with Kent Jones at the New York Film Festival Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Wasp Network, another highlight of this year's New York Film Festival, stars Penélope Cruz and Édgar Ramírez with Gael García Bernal, Wagner Moura, Ana de Armas, and Leonardo Sbaraglia. Inspired by Fernando Morais’s book The Last Soldiers Of The Cold War, the director/screenwriter Olivier Assayas announced that the film shot by Yorick Le Saux and Denis Lenoir, had been edited substantially since it was first shown at the Venice Film Festival on September 1. Assayas considered what we watched at the press screening on the afternoon of Friday, October 4 to be the film's new final cut world première.

Penélope Cruz: "I love babies. Once they get to the set they're mine!" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Wasp Network transports us into the realm of Cubans...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

“Pain and Glory” Movingly Reunites Pedro Almodóvar And Antonio Banderas

Throughout his career, filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar has explored a number of ideas over and over again. His cinematic obsession has defined him, arguably fueling what makes him one of the greats. This week, the legend not only reunites his his longtime male muse Antonio Banderas, but turns his lens on himself in a way with Pain and Glory, the closest thing to an autobiography you’re likely to see from the man. While not at the pinnacle of his filmic output, this is still very fine work, with a tremendous lead performance at its core. In some ways, it’s the film he’s been building up towards making for years. The movie is a drama, one that takes a number of cues from the filmmaker’s life. Here, we follow Salvador Mallo (Banderas), a film director in failing health, as he thinks back on a number of encounters/moments from his past.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

The 10 Best Films by Pedro Almodovar

  • Indiewire
The 10 Best Films by Pedro Almodovar
Pedro Almodóvar’s films talk to each other. Each one informs and inspires the next, and often, one will glance back to pick up the thematic pieces laid down by the last one. Call it the “Pedro Almodóvar Extended Universe.”

Opening October 4, the Spanish auteur’s finest film in years “Pain and Glory” is also his most personal, a colorful vivisection of the director’s life and work, his regrets and achievements. No doubt playing a version of the Academy Award-winning director himself, Antonio Banderas stars as Salvador Mallo, a filmmaker in creative crisis who begins experimenting with drugs in the lead-up to a local career retrospective of his work. Banderas won the 2019 Best Actor prize at the Cannes Film Festival for his portrayal, and he now has a strong shot at his first Oscar nomination ever, especially since this is one of Almodóvar’s most accessible efforts.

Pain and Glory
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Death on the Nile’: Kenneth Branagh’s Agatha Christie Sequel Snags Annette Bening, Gal Gadot, and Armie Hammer

‘Death on the Nile’: Kenneth Branagh’s Agatha Christie Sequel Snags Annette Bening, Gal Gadot, and Armie Hammer
Kenneth Branagh’s first foray into the rich world of Agatha Christie murder mysteries, the 2017 surprise hit “Murder on the Orient Express,” boasted a starry cast of big names, including Michelle Pfeiffer, Penélope Cruz, Johnny Depp, Willem Dafoe, Lucy Boynton, and Daisy Ridley, so it’s no surprise that his imminent sequel is just as star-studded. As production commences on “Death on the Nile,” based on Christie’s novel of the same name, the full cast has been announced, and it’s a doozy.

Branagh returns as both director and star, slipping back into the famed mustache that makes his hairy Belgian detective Hercule Poirot so hard to miss. He’ll be joined by a motley assortment of potential murderers, including Tom Bateman (who reprises the role of Bouc from “Murder on the Orient Express”), Annette Bening, Russell Brand, Ali Fazal, Dawn French, Gal Gadot, Armie Hammer, Rose Leslie, Emma Mackey,
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars: Best International Feature Film Race Faces Deadline, and a Stacked Field

Oscars: Best International Feature Film Race Faces Deadline, and a Stacked Field
Last year’s final foreign-language Oscar nominations — for what is now called the Best International Feature Film category — were culled from 87 submissions from around the world, and this year’s crop could be close to that number. The Academy will announce its list of eligible submissions after the official deadline of today, October 1.

Leading the crowded field is “Parasite” (Neon) from Bong Joon Ho (“Okja”), who returned to Cannes and took home the Palme d’Or, the first Korean filmmaker to do so. He could also become the first Oscar nominee from South Korea. Neon is pushing the film in multiple categories, hoping for the range of Oscar nods scored by Netflix’s “Roma” and Amazon’s “Cold War” last year.

Winning Best Actor at Cannes was Antonio Banderas, star of Oscar winner Pedro Almodóvar’s autobiographical “Pain & Glory” (October 4), who is long overdue for an Oscar nomination. Banderas gives a subtle,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Oscars: Best International Feature Film Race Faces Deadline, and a Stacked Field

Oscars: Best International Feature Film Race Faces Deadline, and a Stacked Field
Last year’s final foreign-language Oscar nominations — for what is now called the Best International Feature Film category — were culled from 87 submissions from around the world, and this year’s crop could be close to that number. The Academy will announce its list of eligible submissions after the official deadline of today, October 1.

Leading the crowded field is “Parasite” (Neon) from Bong Joon Ho (“Okja”), who returned to Cannes and took home the Palme d’Or, the first Korean filmmaker to do so. He could also become the first Oscar nominee from South Korea. Neon is pushing the film in multiple categories, hoping for the range of Oscar nods scored by Netflix’s “Roma” and Amazon’s “Cold War” last year.

Winning Best Actor at Cannes was Antonio Banderas, star of Oscar winner Pedro Almodóvar’s autobiographical “Pain & Glory” (October 4), who is long overdue for an Oscar nomination. Banderas gives a subtle,
See full article at Indiewire »

Brazilian drama ‘Pacified’ wins top award in San Sebastián

Brazilian drama ‘Pacified’ wins top award in San Sebastián
The Endless Trench’ picked up four prizes.

Brazilian production Pacified (Pacificado) by Us director Paxton Winters won the top award at the San Sebastián International Film Festival, at the ceremony held on Saturday, September 28.

With Darren Aronofsky as a producer, the film is set in a favela in Rio de Janeiro.

The jury, led by Irish filmmaker Neil Jordan, also awarded Pacified the Silver Shell for best actor to Bukassa Kabengele and the Jury prize for best cinematography to Laura Merians.

Paxton Winters, a reporter and filmmaker, got to know life in the favelas he portrays living there before he tackled Pacified.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Pain and Glory Review: We are treated to his basic themes of desire, passion, family and identity

  • ShockYa
Pain And Glory (Dolor y Gloria) Sony Pictures Classics Reviewed for Shockya.com & BigAppleReviews.net linked from Rotten Tomatoes by: Harvey Karten Director: Pedro Almodóvar Screenwriter: Pedro Almodóvar Cast: Antonio Banderas, Asier Etxeandia, Leonardo Sbaraglia, Nora Navas, Julieta Serrano, César Vicente, Asier Flores, Penélope Cruz, Cecilia Roth, Susi Sánchez, Raúl Arévalo, Pedro Casablanc, Julián López, Rosalía […]

The post Pain and Glory Review: We are treated to his basic themes of desire, passion, family and identity appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

10 Things You've Never Noticed In Vanilla Sky

Vanilla Sky is a science fiction thriller which was produced in 2001. It is an English adaptation of the Spanish film Open Your Eyes. It has a strong cast, including Penélope Cruz, Tom Cruise, Cameron Diaz, Jason Lee, and Kurt Russel. The movie is a peculiar mixture of romance, fiction and reality warp – and as an artsy, philosophical work, it attracted both criticism and acclaim. It remains one of those movies viewers should watch more than once, just to dig deeper into its subtler meanings. Here are just 10 things viewers don’t know about Vanilla Sky:

Related: Tom Cruise's 10 Most Memorable Characters
See full article at Screen Rant »

Olivier Assayas Will Take Venice Premiere ‘Wasp Network’ Back to the Editing Room

  • Indiewire
Olivier Assayas Will Take Venice Premiere ‘Wasp Network’ Back to the Editing Room
Olivier Assayas isn’t satisfied with the version of his new film, the Cuban spy epic “Wasp Network,” that world-premiered at the Venice Film Festival last week. According to a report from Deadline, the French writer/director is taking the film back into the editing bay, even as it plays the Toronto International Film Festival this week. The new cut will be unveiled at the film’s U.S. premiere at the New York Film Festival this fall.

“There are a few things that need clarification,” the “Personal Shopper” and “Summer Hours” director told Deadline. “There are a series of fixes I’ll make. I might shorten some parts and lengthen others. The running time won’t change considerably, but it’s about gaining fluidity. I want the film to be understood by those who aren’t aware of the complexities of the local politics. The fixes will be done
See full article at Indiewire »

Miami Film Festival to Open With ‘Pain and Glory,’ Close With ‘Parasite’

  • Variety
Miami Film Festival to Open With ‘Pain and Glory,’ Close With ‘Parasite’
The Miami Gems Film Festival has selected Pedro Almodovar’s semi-autobiographical drama “Pain and Glory,” starring Antonio Banderas and Penélope Cruz, as its opening night title on Oct. 10 at the Tower Theater. The annual confab will close with Cannes Palme d’Or winner “Parasite,” a black comedy from Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho.

The festival also set Brazilian filmmaker Fernando Meirelles’ “The Two Popes,” starring Anthony Hopkins and Jonathan Pryce, as the centerpiece film.

Spotlight screenings at the festival will include Kore-eda Hirokazu’s French-language “The Truth,” a tribute to the actress Catherine Deneuve; as well as the Alma Har’el-directed “Honey Boy, directed by Alma Har’el, written by and starring Shia Labeouf, based on his own experiences as a child actor and early adult life coping with his divorced father’s mental health issues. Also on deck is an adaptation of the book “Motherless Brooklyn,” which was written, directed and stars Edward Norton.
See full article at Variety »

14 Buzziest Movies for Sale at This Year’s Toronto Film Festival (Photos)

  • The Wrap
14 Buzziest Movies for Sale at This Year’s Toronto Film Festival (Photos)
“Bad Education”

Perhaps one of the biggest titles for sale, “Bad Education” stars Hugh Jackman, Allison Janney, Ray Romano and Alex Wolff and is based on the real-life events that took place at writer Mike Makowsky’s high school.

Citizen K

Following his critically lauded “The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley,” Alex Gibney is back with “Citizen K,” a documentary about Mikhail Khodorkovsky, who went from communist to political prisoner in a 20-year battle with Putin.

The Friend

Based on the award-winning Esquire article of the same name, the film follows a man (Jason Segel) who puts his life on hold to help his friends though a terminal cancer diagnosis. Dakota Johnson and Casey Affleck also star in the Gabriela Cowperthwaite (“Blackfish”) film.

How to Build a Girl

Everyone is obsessed with Beanie Feldstein following her performance in “Booksmart,” so naturally, this film has become a buzzy title for Tiff buyers.
See full article at The Wrap »

Wasp Network review – Havana's shadow army fuels taut Cuban spy drama

Carlos director Oliver Assayas concocts an exciting and labyrinthine Miami-based thriller from a cold-war espionage story, co-starring Penélope Cruz

One morning in Cuba, René González kisses his wife and child goodbye, drives to the airstrip and steals a yellow biplane. He is fleeing poverty and communism and lighting out for the west – just another intrepid defector poised to fold himself in amid the swimming pools and art deco apartments of an abundant Miami. His future’s so bright he needs aviator shades.

Except, it’s more complicated than that. Yes, Olivier Assayas’s labyrinthine political thriller is here to shine a light on the exiles who targeted communist Cuba in the 1990s. But the film’s title is a clue to where its true loyalties lie. The so-called Wasp Network was a deep-cover cabal of state-funded spies, tasked with infiltrating anti-Castro groups in the Us and relaying information back home.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Venice Film Review: ‘Wasp Network’

  • Variety
Venice Film Review: ‘Wasp Network’
It’s hard to think of another working director who encompasses the range and moods of Olivier Assayas, from beautifully crafted minor-key notes covering major issues like “Non-Fiction,” to films of mysterious, introspective ambiguity like “Personal Shopper,” to the sweeping symphonic feast of “Carlos.” That latter epic will be the most common reference point when people discuss “Wasp Network,” a meaty true-story group portrait of a bunch of Cuban spies who infiltrated anti-Castro networks in Florida in the 1990s. Yet , engaging with major characters and events that are dropped in or out with an unsatisfying degree of regularity.

One suspects the original conception was closer to the length of “Carlos,” and though “Wasp Network” will be easier to distribute, with the potential for reaching audiences not usually attuned to the director’s work, it leaves viewers gratified by the filmmaking bravura and the sheer pleasure of watching this superb cast in top form,
See full article at Variety »

76th Venice Film Festival: Wasp Network Movie Review

  • ShockYa
76th Venice Film Festival: Wasp Network Movie Review
Title: Wasp Network Director: Olivier Assayas Cast: Penélope Cruz, Édgar Ramírez, Gael García Bernal, Ana de Armas, Leonardo Sbaraglia and Wagner Moura. Director Olivier Assayas presented Wasp Network at the 2019 Venice Film Festival, a film based on Fernando Morais’ book The Last Soldiers Of The Cold War, starring Penelope Cruz, Edgar Ramírez, Ana de […]

The post 76th Venice Film Festival: Wasp Network Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

‘Wasp Network’ Film Review: Penélope Cruz and Edgar Ramírez Spy for Castro in Talky Thriller

  • The Wrap
‘Wasp Network’ Film Review: Penélope Cruz and Edgar Ramírez Spy for Castro in Talky Thriller
It’s unusual for a Western film to present spies for Fidel Castro as the heroes. And that novelty, alas, is one of the few selling points of “Wasp Network,” a surprising disappointment from Olivier Assayas, one of the more interesting and eclectic filmmakers working today.

Assayas previously teamed with Edgar Ramírez on the gripping “Carlos,” but this time, the true-story aspect of this docudrama seems to have bogged down the filmmaker. When he has occasion to put the plot aside and focus on the characters, “Wasp Network” comes to life, but these moments are too few and far between.

The story itself is fascinating — in the 1990s, Cuban pilots René González (Ramírez) and Juan Pablo Roque made headlines by escaping Cuba and defecting to the United States. (González flew out in a small plane in 1990; Roque swam to Guantanamo Bay two years later.)

Also Read: Penelope Cruz, Gael Garcia
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Wasp Network’ Review: Olivier Assayas’ Spy Epic Is a Rare Misstep From a Master Filmmaker

  • Indiewire
‘Wasp Network’ Review: Olivier Assayas’ Spy Epic Is a Rare Misstep From a Master Filmmaker
Even Wayne Gretzky missed the net a couple of times over the course of his career. An overstuffed espionage thriller that bites off more than it can chew and never manages to find its footing, Olivier Assayas’ “Wasp Network” is . Even so, his restless genius can still be felt percolating below the surface and struggling to come up for air. While this scattered, staccato dramatization of Cuba’s most infamous spy ring struggles to dramatize its tangled web of defections and double-crosses, the movie’s underlying strengths are the stuff of vintage Assayas; its best moments allow the French auteur to explore some of his oldest infatuations against a backdrop made of quicksand. The personal toll of political currents, the friction between analog and digital worlds, hot people looking super hot together — so many of Assayas’ favorite things are trying so hard to poke through this convoluted true story, but
See full article at Indiewire »

Pleasure Principle: The Early Films of Pedro Almodóvar

  • MUBI
Mubi's retrospective, The Art of Transgression: The Cinema of Almodóvar, is showing August 18 – October 19, 2019 in the United Kingdom.“Cinephilia is not only a love for cinema. It’s a relation to the world through cinema.”—Serge DaneyThe impulse to divide filmmaking careers into identifiable stages continues to be an attractive one for critics, particularly those of a more auteurist bent. So-called “early” works might demonstrate identifiable talent cut with too-conspicuous borrowings, stylistic excesses, or sophomoric tendencies, while those of a “late period” might exhibit a more casual mastery of form, and a general sense of introspectiveness, the director having taken previous successes as license to express their personality through more self-consciously pared-down works. Of course, actual careers aren’t quite so easily narrativized, and such demarcations, while useful, threaten to smooth out the anomalies present in most any artistic progression. But on the surface at least, the career of
See full article at MUBI »
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