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Lina Wertmüller Feted by Nancy Meyers, Lisa Cholodenko and More

  • Variety
Lina Wertmüller Feted by Nancy Meyers, Lisa Cholodenko and More
Nancy Meyers, Lisa Cholodenko, Nisha Ganatra and Martha Coolidge came out to Culina at the Four Seasons in Beverly Hills on Thursday afternoon for a Women in Film luncheon in honor of Lina Wertmüller, the legendary Italian director who was the first woman nominated for an Oscar for best director in 1977 for “Seven Beauties.”

Now 91, Wertmüller is in Los Angeles to receive an honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards on Sunday. “The honor is long overdue — 42 years in the making,” said Wif’s Amy Baer.

Seven Beauties” was Wertmüller’s 10th film. “Her directing career encompasses two dozen features, a remarkable feat for any director,” Baer said. “Imagine the fortitude, confidence, and perseverance required for a woman director to get that many films made over four decades. Largely outside of today’s traditional studio systems. It’s remarkable and an inspiration to all women in the screen industries.”

Pascal Vicedomini,
See full article at Variety »

Seven Things We Didn’t Learn in CNN’s Breezy Clip-Fest ‘The Movies: The Eighties’

Seven Things We Didn’t Learn in CNN’s Breezy Clip-Fest ‘The Movies: The Eighties’
CNN premiered the first episode in Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman’s six-part summer series “The Movies” Sunday night, 84 minutes devoted to the 1980s. Subsequent installments cover the 90s and post-2000 and then turn back to the 70s, 60s, and the bulk of core film history — 1930-1950 — crammed into the finale. Silent film, it seems, was not worth a mention.

First of all, this series is not targeted at erudite cinephiles who know their film history. Any self-respecting TCM watcher is too sophisticated for this breezy look at “The Movies.” Clearly the producers are trying to draw younger audiences who might be vaguely familiar with some of the movies here, from Steven Spielberg’s “E.T.” to Martin Scorsese’s “Raging Bull.” (Both directors are on hand to comment.) Snobby old Hollywood lovers sometimes forget that for today’s 18-year-old film fan devouring classic films made before they were born,
See full article at Indiewire »

Octavia Spencer to promote Apple series ‘Truth Be Told’ at Taormina Film Festival

Octavia Spencer to promote Apple series ‘Truth Be Told’ at Taormina Film Festival
Platform will screen features The Elephant Queen, Hala at Sicilian festival.

The Taormina Film Festival (June 30-July 6) in Sicily will celebrate the first TV series in its 65-year history when Octavia Spencer flies in on behalf of Apple TV+’s forthcoming true-crime drama Truth Be Told.

The series will debut on the Apple TV app this autumn. Series executive producer/star Spencer will attend the Italian festival, where she will receive the Taormina Arte Award and highlight the series, which is inspired by a true-crime novel by Katherine Barber.

Apple will screen two of its films at the festival. Mark Deeble
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Octavia Spencer to discuss Apple series ‘Truth Be Told’ at Taormina Film Festival

Octavia Spencer to discuss Apple series ‘Truth Be Told’ at Taormina Film Festival
Platform will screen features The Elephant Queen, Hala at Sicilian festival.

The Taormina Film Festival (June 30-July 6) in Sicily will celebrate the first TV series in its 65-year history when Octavia Spencer flies in to discuss Apple TV+’s forthcoming true-crime drama Truth Be Told.

The series will debut on the Apple TV app this autumn. Series creator and executive producer/star Spencer will attend the Italian festival, where she will receive the Taormina Arte Award and talk about the series, which is inspired by a true-crime novel by Katherine Barber.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Apple to unveil footage from Octavia Spencer series 'Truth Be Told' at Taormina Film Festival

Apple to unveil footage from Octavia Spencer series 'Truth Be Told' at Taormina Film Festival
Sicilian festival will screen the first TV series in its 65-year history.

The Taormina Film Festival (June 30-July 6) in Sicily will screen the first TV series in its 65-year history, Apple TV+’s forthcoming drama Truth Be Told.

Apple will offer a first-look at the series, which will debut on the Apple TV app this autumn. Series creator and executive producer/star Octavia Spencer will come to Taormina to present the series, which is inspired by a true-crime novel by Katherine Barber.

Apple will also show preview footage of See starring Alfre Woodard, and The Morning Show starring Jennifer Aniston,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Barry Jenkins expected to join tiny group of double directing champs at Spirit Awards

Barry Jenkins expected to join tiny group of double directing champs at Spirit Awards
Barry Jenkins took home his first Independent Spirit Award for Best Director two years ago for “Moonlight,” but it looks like he’ll have to clear some room for another: The “If Beale Street Could Talk” helmer is predicted to win the same prize at Saturday’s show, which would make him just the fifth person to win the category twice.

In the Spirit Awards’ 33-year history, four people have earned a record two Best Director Awards: Joel Coen; Alexander Payne (1999’s “Election”; 2004’s “Sideways”); Ang Lee; and Tom McCarthy (2008’s “The Visitor”; 2015’s “Spotlight”). This means, should Jenkins prevail, he’d had the shortest span — two years — between his two wins.

See Barry Jenkins may join Coppola, Payne and more as double Oscar winners for Best Adapted Screenplay

Jenkins has 71/20 odds, but many of our pundits are split between him and No. 2 Debra Granik (“Leave No Trace”). Granik has
See full article at Gold Derby »

Like father, like son: Spike Lee could direct John David Washington to an Oscar nom 26 years after his dad

  • Gold Derby
Like father, like son: Spike Lee could direct John David Washington to an Oscar nom 26 years after his dad
The Oscars often like to keep it in the family. Consider two-time nominee Laura Dern, the daughter of Oscar nominees Diane Ladd and Bruce Dern; Oscar winner Angelina Jolie, the daughter of fellow champ Jon Voight; and those multi-generational Oscar winning Hustons, Fondas and Coppolas. But this year could bring an unusual twist to that story of awards inheritance: John David Washington (“BlacKkKlansman”) could earn a Best Actor nomination 26 years after his dad Denzel Washington was nominated in the same category for “Malcolm X” (1992) — both from the same director, Spike Lee.

It’s not unprecedented for the same filmmaker to direct Oscar nominated performances from the same family. Dern and her mom Ladd actually earned nominations for the same film, “Rambling Rose” (1991) by Martha Coolidge. And the Hustons kept it all in the family: filmmaker John Huston directed his dad Walter Huston to a Best Supporting Actor Oscar win for
See full article at Gold Derby »

Valley Girl

One of the oldies celebrated by lovers of ’80s fare, Martha Coolidge’s ode to pampered teens in La La Land has aged extremely well. It’s still fairly representative of reality, but the romantic fairy tale angle is what keeps it afloat. Nicolas Cage’s unguarded vulnerability and Deborah Foreman’s infectious smile win the day — we like these kids, even if they’re somewhat idealized.

Valley Girl

Blu-ray

Shout Select

1983 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 99 min. / Street Date October 30, 2018 / 34.93

Starring: Nicolas Cage, Deborah Foreman, Elizabeth Daily, Michael Bowen, Cameron Dye, Heidi Holicker, Michelle Meyrink, Tina Theberge, Lee Purcell, Richard Sanders, Colleen Camp, Frederic Forrest, David Ensor, The Plimsouls, Josie Cotton.

Cinematography: Frederick Elmes

Film Editor: Éva Gárdos

Original Music: Mark Levinthal, Scott Wilk

Produced and Written by Andrew Lane, Wayne Crawford

Directed by Martha Coolidge

Women directors of the 1980s didn’t have a smooth ride, as can be attested
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blu-ray Review: Valley Girl is Totally Tubular

Until now, I've never seen Martha Coolidge's 1983 film, Valley Girl. I'm not usually one for romantic comedies, but having recently lived in "the valley," I was interested. Of course, this is also the film that was Nicolas Cage's first starring role.  Normally, a film like this isn't my jam, but I try to step outside my usual boundries now and then. This film is light and breezy, bathed in the warm glow of early '80s Southern California --- with a great soundtrack. It's the classic boy-meets-girl type of film, and they can't be together, because one of them is from the wrong side of the tracks, except in this case, the wrong side of the Hollywood Hills. Julie (Deborah Foreman) meets Randy (Nicolas Cage)...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘Valley Girl’ Blu-ray Joins Shout Select in October

Shout Factory's Shout Select Blu-ray label will be adding the 80s romantic comedy Valley Girl starring Nicolas Cage and Deborah Foreman on October 16th.

Valley Girl will rock a new HD transfer and is considered a collector's edition release for its Blu-ray debut.

The Valley Girl Blu-ray bonus features are a pleasant mix of all-new material combined with previously released material from the old DVD.

Here's a complete breakdown of what to expect.

New “In Conversation – Director Martha Coolidge with Actors E.G. Daily and Heidi Holicker"

New “Greetings from the San Fernando Valley” (A short history of the iconic San Fernando Valley) Hosted by Tommy Gelinas of The Valley Relics Museum

New Extended Interviews from 2003 with Nicolas Cage, Cameron Dye, Frederic Forrest, E.G. Daily, Colleen Camp, Lee Purcell, Producers Andrew Lane and Wayne Crawford, Peter Case of

The Plimsouls, Josie Cotton, DJ Richard Blade, and more

Storyboard
See full article at TheHDRoom »

Creator Of ’80s Satire ‘Sledge Hammer!’ Eyes Reboot For Trigger-Happy Hero

  • Deadline
Creator Of ’80s Satire ‘Sledge Hammer!’ Eyes Reboot For Trigger-Happy Hero
A classic cult comedy from the ’80s with a global following could be added to the list of TV reboots, as its creator targets cable or streaming as potential landing places.

Sledge Hammer! was a subversive satire chronicling the misadventures of a deranged, violent lawman (David Rasche) who created chaos and destruction in his pursuit of justice. Many still remember it for an early scene in the pilot episode (watch it above), or the infamous season finale cliffhanger wherein the title character accidentally nuked the world. Created by Alan Spencer, the series remains one of the more unconventional half-hour comedies to ever air on network TV. It also was ahead of its time in that its pilot was directed by a woman, Martha Coolidge.

Despite only lasting two seasons on ABC from 1986-88, Sledge Hammer! always had a fervent fan base of “Hammerheads,” who followed the show into syndication and DVD.
See full article at Deadline »

‘Diane’, ‘Island Of The Hungry Ghosts’, Alia Shawkat & Jeffrey Wright Among Tribeca Winners

‘Diane’, ‘Island Of The Hungry Ghosts’, Alia Shawkat & Jeffrey Wright Among Tribeca Winners
Top honors at the 17th annual Tribeca Film Festival have gone to Diane for the Founders Award for Best U.S. Narrative Feature, Smuggling Hendrix for Best International Narrative Feature, and Island of the Hungry Ghosts for Best Documentary Feature. On the acting side, Alia Shawkat won Best Actress in a U.S. Narrative Feature Film for Miguel Arteta’s Duck Butter, and Jeffrey Wright took the Best Actor honor for O.G.

First-time narrative director and writer Kent Jones (who is also the executive director of the New York Film Festival) won two prizes at Tribeca for Diane, and the film starring Mary Kay Place won three. Estelle Parsons, Andrea Martin, Deirdre O’Connell and Jake Lacy co-star in the film, about a widowed, altruistic seventysomething woman whose life is dictated by the needs of others, and who finds herself forced to look at her own identity.

Screenings of
See full article at Deadline »

2018 Tribeca Film Festival Awards: ‘Diane,’ ‘Smuggling Hendrix,’ and More Take Top Honors

2018 Tribeca Film Festival Awards: ‘Diane,’ ‘Smuggling Hendrix,’ and More Take Top Honors
The 2018 Tribeca Film Festival has announced this year’s award winners, with “Diane,” “Smuggling Hendrix,” and “Island of the Hungry Ghosts” among the honorees. 99 feature-length films screened alongside 55 shorts at this year’s edition of the festival, which is ongoing until this Sunday, April 29.

“It is rewarding to honor films that tell important stories and moved our juries in profound way,” commented Jane Rosenthal, CEO, Executive Chair, and Co-Founder of the festival. “Whether they excite, incite, inspire or simply entertain, it is a privilege to launch this worthy group with this special honor at Tribeca.” Full list of winners:

U.S. Narrative Competition

Founders Award for Best Narrative Feature: Diane written and directed by Kent Jones. Winner receives $20,000, sponsored by At&T, and the art award “The Lady of Shalott, Cool Evening” by Stephen Hannock. The award was given by on behalf of the jury by Robert De Niro and Jane Rosenthal joined by Fiona Carter,
See full article at Indiewire »

Tribeca Sets Juries For Features, Shorts, Awards & More

  • Deadline
The Tribeca Film Festival has finalized its juries for the 2018 fest, two days before it kicks off its 17th edition. Names including Martha Coolidge, Norman Reedus, André Holland, Ray Liotta, Chris Messina, Zosia Mamet, Sasheer Zamata, Alyssa Reiner, Josh Charles, Haifaa Al Mansour and Lakeith Stanfield have been set to oversee the features, shorts, Storyscapes section and awards categories.

The fest launches Wednesday night with the world premiere of the Gilda Radner documentary Love, Gilda. Tribeca runs April 18-29 in New York City.

Here’s the full list of jurors:

Feature Film Competition Categories

The jurors for the 2018 Us Narrative Competition section are:

Justin Bartha: Actor Justin Bartha has co-starred in two be-loved billion dollar franchises: The Hangover and National Treasure. Some of Bartha’s other notable film credits include White Girl, Holy Rollers, Dark Horse, The Rebound, opposite Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Failure to Launch with Matthew McConaughey and Sarah Jessica Parker.
See full article at Deadline »

'Blockers': Meet the Woman Behind the Female 'Superbad'

'Blockers': Meet the Woman Behind the Female 'Superbad'
Kay Cannon is ticking off names, one finger at a time. "There's Amy Heckerling," she says, mentioning the Fast Times at Ridgemont High director, "and Tamra Davis ... Nora Ephron did at least one ... and the two women behind the Bridget Jones' movies, I can't remember their names." After some memory-jogging, both Betty Thomas (Private Parts) and Martha Coolidge (Valley Girl) are added to the list; so is Rough Night's Lucia Aniello and, thanks to Jumpin' Jack Flash, Penny Marshall. "You know, there's a pot-smoking scene in It's Complicated,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Breaking Film and TV Industry News — April 3

Tuesday, April 3

Sundance Selects announced that it has acquired U.S. rights to the film “Blaze,” co-written, produced and directed by Ethan Hawke. Sybil Rosen co-wrote the film with Hawke based on her memoir “Living in the Woods in a Tree: Remembering Blaze Foley.” Jake Seal, John Sloss and Ryan Hawke produced alongside Ethan Hawke.

The film held its world premiere at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival where newcomer Ben Dickey won the Special Jury Award for Achievement in Acting for his portrayal of Blaze Foley. The is inspired by the life of Blaze Foley, the unsung songwriting legend of the Texas outlaw music movement that spawned the likes of Merle Haggard and Willie Nelson. The film weaves together three different periods of time, braiding re-imagined versions of Blaze’s past, present and future. The different strands explore his love affair with Sybil Rosen; his final performance in a near-empty honky-tonk; his last,
See full article at Indiewire »

Vancouver Film: "Skyscraper", "Siren", "Colony"

  • SneakPeek
From VancouverFilm.Net, here is the Vancouver Film Production Update for October 2017 including "Skyscraper", "Siren", "Colony" and a whole lot more:

Features:

A Dogs Way Home

Local Production Company: Singularity Productions

Director: Charles Martin Smith

Producer: Gavin Polone

Oct 16/17 - Dec 15/17

Eggplant Emoji

Local Production Company: Eggplant Productions

Director: Jake Szymanski

Producer: Ross Dinerstein

Aug 21/17 - Oct 05/17

Elsewhere

Local Production Company: Elsewhere Productions

Director: Hernan Jimenez Garcia

Sep 11/17 - Oct 11/17

Nicole

Local Production Company: True Meaning Productions

Director: Marc Lawrence

Oct 23/17 - Jan 19/18

Skyscraper

Local Production Company: Main Mast Production - Can, Inc

Director: Rawson Marshall Thurter

Aug 14/17 - Nov 17/17

Untitled Robert Zemeckis Project

Local Production Company: Stiletto Cinema Partners

Director: Robert Zemeckis

Producer: Robert Zemeckis, Cherylanne Martin

Aug 11/17 - Oct 19/17

TV Series:

A Series Of Unfortunate Events ~ Season 2

Local Production Company: Olaf II Productions Inc

Director: Loni Peristere, Allan Arkush

Apr 17/17 - Apr 20/18

Arrow - Season 6

Local Production Company:
See full article at SneakPeek »

Guest Post: Plenty of Qualified Women Directors Are Ready to Fill the Ranks

Rachel Feldman

Guest Post by Rachel Feldman

If asked to imagine a film or TV director, most people conjure the image of a man. Sadly, this is true for those who work in the film and television industry as well. In fact, research from USC Annenberg’s Media, Diversity & Social Change Initiative confirms that zero percent of Hollywood executives have any women director’s names at the top of their minds. Of course, those in the know have lists that include Kathryn Bigelow, Patty Jenkins, or Ava DuVernay in features and Lesli Linka Glatter or Reed Morano in television — but there are also hundreds, if not thousands, of highly skilled women directors who have been invisible for way too long.

The statistics for women directing stagnates at four percent in feature films and at 17 percent in television, and although the 17 percent in TV may initially sound like forward momentum, when statistically analyzed it proves to be an illusory number because it doesn’t represent the number of women directing, only the number of episodes directed by women. In other words, it is often the same few women doing all the work. But the fact is that there are over 1,300 experienced women directors in the Directors Guild of America (DGA), many with decades of experience in high-quality broadcast and cable television. So why do only about 50 of these directors appear and re-appear on network hiring lists?

Last week NBC announced a new “Female Forward” program that will train 10 new women directors a year through a shadowing program. NBC President Jennifer Salke says that the pool of available directors is “too small” and she’s excited about the idea of having 30 new directors in three years. Of course it’s fantastic that NBC is going to create a program in support of women directors, but it would be a mistake not to correct an insidious false assumption that continues to undermine real progress.

Salke is by no means alone in her thinking: it is a predominate belief throughout the entire industry that one of the reasons why gender employment statistics are so low is because there just aren’t enough qualified women directors to fill the ranks. But this is patently untrue.

The fact is that NBC could have 100 highly skilled directors tomorrow. If our industry truly wants swift, equitable gender equity in the director ranks, the answer is not simply to train new directors and hope for the future. We need to find and hire the large pool of already trained, highly accomplished women directors who have been toiling in the trenches for decades. We need to make the change now.

The employment mechanism for hiring directors is, no doubt, complex. There are many levels of executives, all who need to vet a director. That’s why directors with hot credits and repped by top agents are easy to notice — and those who may not have a recent credit, or who are not represented by a high-profile agent or manager, become invisible.

Women’s careers also look different from their male counterparts’. Women often step away from thriving careers to raise children and care for family members. Add in the gender bias that makes each and every job a Sisyphean hurdle and it’s simple to see how women lose their reps and fall off rosters. But these women are indomitable. Many have thriving careers in allied fields as writers, producers, editors, ADs, or teachers. Some make independent features. All of them are eager to be making an honorable living, with goldstar health insurance, using the masterful skills they have taken a lifetime to hone.

In life, and certainly in the movie business, we are taught that we will be rewarded for tenacity and determination, but so far this has not proven true for an army of women directors.

Meryl Streep sponsors a program for mid-career women writers through New York Women in Film & Television, the Writers Guild of America has made enormous strides supporting the careers of their experienced female members with a variety of initiatives and programs, and The Ravenal Foundation and The Jerome Foundation have long supported mid-career female feature directors. But in the television director landscape the continued focus on new, untrained directors as the sole way to ameliorate a widespread problem is both an unimaginative solution and an enormous injustice to women who have already been injured by decades of gender exclusion.

DuVernay, Oprah Winfrey, and Ryan Murphy are trendsetting new formulas in hiring television directors. They understand that the status quo is not serving directors who are not white men and they are hiring both veteran directors who’ve fallen off hiring lists as well as promising talent. But a handful of progressive thinkers is not enough. The entire industry — networks, studios, producers, and agencies — must create avenues of opportunity for mid-career women directors. It may require a bit of work to discover this gold mine of talent but just below the surface are literally hundreds of brilliant women directors who deserve a break.

This past presidential election was a disgraceful example of how accomplished, highly experienced women can be disregarded. Hiding behind excuses of: “It’s our [pick one] first/second/third season,” or “We have [pick one] stunts/VFX/finicky actors/cross-boarding/a tricky tone…” is as misogynistic/patriarchal as men who think they can grab women wherever they want. We must continue to ask why men are regarded with great potential and women are seen as needing to have a continuing education. Mid-career women directors are trained to figure out what they need to tell a story and it’s high time for the film and TV machine to support and nurture this valuable resource.

Create your own programs and initiatives or search for us at The Director List and the DGA.

And here is a just-a-tip-of-the-iceberg list of experienced television directors — not intended to be exhaustive or comprehensive — to illustrate the bounty to be discovered. There are also hundreds more accomplished women in the independent world:

Victoria Hochberg, Gloria Muzio, Neema Barnette, Debbie Reinisch, Hanelle Culpepper, Martha Coolidge, Amy Heckerling, Tanya Hamilton, Tessa Blake, Kat Candler, Shannon McCormack Flynn, Ellen Pressman, Leslie Libman, Vicky Jenson, Stacy Title, Linda Feferman, Matia Karrell, Maggie Greenwald, Deborah Kampmeier, Debra Granik, Darnell Martin, Anna Foerster, Heather Cappiello, Nicole Rubio, Leslie Libman, Beth Spitalny, Daisy Von Scherler Mayer, Jan Eliasberg, Elodie Keene, Diana Valentine, Jessica Landaw, Julie Hebert, Julie Anne Robinson, Katherine Brooks, Martha Mitchell, Nicole Kassell, Nzingha Stewart, Rachel Talalay, Rose Troche, Stacey Black, Alexis Korycinski, Allison Anders, Ami Canaan Mann, Amy Redford, Anna Mastro, Anne Renton, Catherine Jelski, Claudia Weill, Dee Rees, Helen Hunt, Jessica Yu, Donna Deitch, Kasi Lemmons, Lily Mariye, So Yong Kim, Tina Mabry, Tanya Hamilton, Rachel Feldman

Rachel Feldman has directed more than 60 hours of television and is in development to direct her award-winning screenplay “Fair Fight,” a political thriller based on the life of Fair Pay activist Lilly Ledbetter. She is a former chair of the DGA Women’s Steering Committee. Go to her website for more information. #WomenCallAction

Guest Post: Plenty of Qualified Women Directors Are Ready to Fill the Ranks was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Valley Girl

Martha Coolidge’s directorial debut introduced the local phenomenon of ValleySpeak to an unbelieving world. An early exemplar of the let-the-song-score tell the story, it features a panoply of period bands, but not all those listed in the credits can actually be heard in the film today. Due to music rights problems, songs by The Clash, Culture Club, Banararama and The Jam had to be dropped after the trailer was in circulation.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Newswire: Mae Whitman is totally going to be in the Valley Girl musical remake

In some totally tubular news, Variety reports that Mae Whitman has just joined the Valley Girl musical remake. Whitman will play a “punk rock lesbian” who is Randy’s (Josh Whitehouse, who succeeds Nicolas Cage) bandmate and best friend. Mary + Jane’s Jessica Rothe is in the role of Julie, who was played by Deborah Foreman in the original film. MGM’s backing the project, based on Martha Coolidge’s 1983 film, which will be directed by Rachel Lee Goldenberg from a script by Amy Talkington, with some doctoring from Martin Noxon. Matt Smith—the Maleficent executive producer, not the Doctor—is producing. The original soundtrack, which includes some Toni Basil, Sparks, and Bananarama, should afford the filmmakers plenty of opportunities to make this a bitchin’ musical adaptation.
See full article at The AV Club »
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