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DVD Review: "The Double Man" (1967) Starring Yul Brynner And Britt Ekland, Warner Archive Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

The Warner Archive has released a slew of worthwhile 60s spy movies and TV series. Among the under-rated gems is The Double Man, a 1967 Cold War thriller starring Yul Brynner, who gives a powerful performance as American intelligence agent Dan Slater. His teenage son is killed while skiing in Switzerland and Slater suspects it was actually murder. He finds he's been lured to Alps as part of a complex plot to kill him and replace him with an enemy agent with his identical facial features and characteristics. The plot was covered with moss even at the time since it formed the basis of a two-part Man From U.N.C.L.E. episode, The Double Affair, that was released theatrically the previous year as The Spy With My Face.  Still, this is a highly intelligent, gritty film with Brynner as the most hard-ass hero imaginable. Devoid of any humor,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Tarantino’s ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ Teaser Drops Timely Clues It Goes Back Way Before the Manson Murders

Tarantino’s ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ Teaser Drops Timely Clues It Goes Back Way Before the Manson Murders
For almost as long as we’ve been hearing about “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” Quentin Tarantino and Sony Pictures, which will release the film, have tried to dispel the notion that it will be all about the Manson murders.

They couldn’t have made their point better than they did with the teaser trailer released Wednesday. Tarantino signals with the teaser that that the film won’t just be a portrait of one horrible night in 1969, but rather of an entire era, sweeping across at least three years prior to the Manson murders.

Because he’s Quentin Tarantino, he doled out those clues via obscure Bruce Lee knowledge, old TV and movie marquees. Let’s look at all the signs, literal and figurative, that “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” won’t surrender its story to Manson.

First, Some Background

On Aug. 9, 1969, Sharon Tate (played by Margot Robbie
See full article at The Wrap »

The Prize

Already eclipsed by James Bond and sexier European films, Paul Newman does his best to energize this derivative but lively spy-chase thriller set during Nobel season, in a Stockholm populated by the glamorous Elke Sommer, Diane Baker, Micheline Presle and Jacqueline Beer. Toss several Hitchcock pictures into a blender, and what comes out is reasonably engaging… and more than a little dated.

The Prize

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1963 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 134 min. / Street Date January 15, 2019 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Paul Newman, Edward G. Robinson, Elke Sommer, Diane Baker, Micheline Presle, Gérard Oury, Sergio Fantoni, Kevin McCarthy, Leo G. Carroll, Sacha Pitoëff, Jacqueline Beer, John Wengraf, Don Dubbin, Virginia Christine, Rudolph Anders, Martine Bartlett, Karl Swenson, John Qualen, John Banner, Teru Shimada, Albert Carrier, Jerry Dunphy, Britt Ekland, Gergory Gaye, Anna Lee, Gregg Palmer, Gene Roth, Ivan Triesault.

Cinematography: William H. Daniels

Film Editor: Adrienne Fazan

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Tarantino Takes Hollywood Back to 1969 in Once Upon a Time Set Video

Tarantino Takes Hollywood Back to 1969 in Once Upon a Time Set Video
Quentin Tarantino must be in heaven. He's described the late 60s as the best period of his young life. And now he's transformed the streets of Hollywood into a 1969 playground. One has to wonder if he's using the set of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood not to just make a movie, but to create his own personal time machine. A new video has arrived from set, and the city has certainly been transformed.

In the video, we see period cars and buses. Park benches. Store fronts that have been taken back in time. And it is all rather magical. One can't help but get lost in this transformative world, a place Tarantino has described as being much better than today.

The eagle-eyed viewer will notice a lot of Quentin Tarantino trademarks in the video. Not only do we get a period accurate Hollywood, there is a fairytale element to it all.

Tarantino Takes Hollywood Back to 1969 in Once Upon a Time Set Video

Tarantino Takes Hollywood Back to 1969 in Once Upon a Time Set Video
Quentin Tarantino must be in heaven. He's described the late 60s as the best period of his young life. And now he's transformed the streets of Hollywood into a 1969 playground. One has to wonder if he's using the set of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood not to just make a movie, but to create his own personal time machine. A new video has arrived from set, and the city has certainly been transformed.

In the video, we see period cars and buses. Park benches. Store fronts that have been taken back in time. And it is all rather magical. One can't help but get lost in this transformative world, a place Tarantino has described as being much better than today.

The eagle-eyed viewer will notice a lot of Quentin Tarantino trademarks in the video. Not only do we get a period accurate Hollywood, there is a fairytale element to it all.
See full article at MovieWeb »

January 16th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Happy Death Day, Eye Of The Cat, Blade Runner 2049

  • DailyDead
Welcome back for another week of horror and sci-fi home entertainment releases, readers! January 16th features plenty of intriguing offerings, from cult classics to sequels of cult classics to even a few recent films as well. If you happened to miss Blade Runner 2049, Happy Death Day, or The Snowman in theaters, all three are making their way home this Tuesday. Severin Films has put together The Amicus Collection (which features Asylum, And Now The Screaming Starts and The Beast Must Die), and Scream Factory is giving Eye of the Cat the Blu-ray treatment as well.

Beyond Skyline is also coming to Blu on January 16th, and for all you Joe Dante fans out there, Shout Select has put together a Collector’s Edition release of Matinee that looks like it’s a must-have.

The Amicus Collection (Severin Films, Blu-ray)

Known as The Studio That Dripped Blood, the British film
See full article at DailyDead »

December 19th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Suspiria 4K Restoration, The Amicus Collection, American Gothic (1988)

  • DailyDead
With Christmas now only a week away, there’s a big day of genre-related home entertainment releases to look forward to in the meantime, just in case you were in need of some last-minute gift ideas (or if you were looking to spoil yourself, which is totally cool). Easily my most anticipated Blu-ray release for all of 2017, Synapse Films' stunning 4K restoration of Suspiria gets the royal treatment via an incredible three-disc limited edition Steelbook set this Tuesday, and Severin Films is also keeping busy with their HD upgrade of The Amicus Collection, which includes Asylum, And Now The Screaming Starts, and The Beast Must Die.

Other notable Blu-ray and DVD releases for December 19th include American Gothic, Leatherface, mother!, and the limited edition Steelbook for Donnie Darko.

American Gothic (Scream Factory, Blu-ray)

A new tale of terror from the director of The Legend of Hell House and The Incubus.
See full article at DailyDead »

10 Horror Movie Reboots Gone Horribly Wrong

10 Horror Movie Reboots Gone Horribly Wrong
Oh, horror movies. Market research showed that more people knew the phrase Texas Chainsaw Massacre than the number of people who had seen it or even knew what it was about. So you know what that means! Reboot time! Now, there's nothing inherently wrong with rebooting a popular film and/or franchise. But there's also no rule that says they have to be bad. Nevertheless, crappy remakes keep plaguing horror fans. We're looking at 10 horror movie reboots that went horribly wrong.

Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003) and Texas Chainsaw 3D (2013)

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre is easily one of the scariest movies of all time, no question. Loosely based on true events, put together in the early '70s on a shoestring budget, this thing played like some sorta snuff film. It's chilling. It's such a great horror film that once the sequels stopped coming, Hollywood tried to reboot it not once, but twice.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Severin Films to Bring 1970s Horror Movies to the Holidays with December Release of The Amicus Collection Blu-ray Box Set

  • DailyDead
Severin Films will bring horror to the holidays this December with their box set of three 1970s movies from Amicus Productions, aka "The Studio That Dripped Blood."

Slated for a December 5th release, Severin Films' The Amicus Collection includes Blu-rays of Asylum, And Now the Screaming Starts, The Beast Must Die, and a bonus disc of interviews, trailers, and more.

Each remastered Blu-ray is packed with new special features that offer insights into the making of the movies and the creative minds behind each effort.

The Amicus Collection box set is priced at $54.99, and it's also available in a special bundle that includes a T-shirt, enamel pins, book, and artwork (for an overall price of $129.00). You can also pick up And Now the Screaming Starst and Asylum as individual Blu-rays for $24.99 apiece).

For more information about The Amicus Collection, we have the full release details, cover art images, and
See full article at DailyDead »

The Man with the Golden Gun’s Britt Ekland Mourns Roger Moore: ‘My Bond Is Gone’

The Man with the Golden Gun’s Britt Ekland Mourns Roger Moore: ‘My Bond Is Gone’
Another one of Roger Moore’s onscreen vixens is paying tribute to the beloved 007 star in the wake of his death.

Britt Ekland – who was Bond girl Mary Goodnight to Moore’s 007 in 1974’s The Man with the Golden Gun – took to Twitter to mourn the 89-year-old actor on Tuesday.

“My Bond is gone, am filled with great sadness,” wrote Ekland, now 74. “Roger was the epitome of Bond, witty, sophisticated, elegant, funny. Rip.”

My Bond is gone, am filled with great sadness. Roger was the epitome of Bond, witty, sofisticated, elegant, funny. Rip

Britt Ekland (@BrittEkland) May 23, 2017

Moore, who died
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

After The Fox / Being There

After The Fox

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber

2017 / Color / 2.35 : 1 widescreen / Street Date March 22, 2017

Starring: Peter Sellers, Victor Mature, Martin Balsem, Akim Tamiroff.

Cinematography: Leonida Barboni

Film Editor: Russell Lloyd

Written by Neil Simon and Cesare Zavattini

Produced by John Bryan

Directed by Vittorio De Sica

After The Fox, a sunny mid-sixties farce about con-artists and movie-makers, boasts a powerhouse pedigree featuring leading men Peter Sellers and Victor Mature, a script by Neil Simon and Cesare Zavattini, music by Burt Bacharach, poster art from Frank Frazetta and the legendary director/actor/gambler Vittorio De Sica at the helm.

With such diverse talent on board, the film was somewhat misleadingly promoted as another in the line of 60’s screwball hipster comedies like Casino Royale and What’s New Pussycat. But the result is closer to De Sica’s laid back charmers from the ‘50s, Miracle in Milan and Gold of Naples (in fact,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

October Horrors Day 2 – The Wicker Man (1973)

The Wicker Man, 1973

Directed by Robin Hardy

Starring Edward Woodward, Britt Ekland, Diane Cilento, Ingrid Pitt and Christopher Lee

Synopsis:

Police Sergeant Howie arrives on the small Scottish island of Summerisle to investigate the alleged disappearance of a 12-year-old girl. However, despite Howie’s inquiries, it seems that either no one on the island knows that the girl exists, or that they claim that she has been dead for some time. As Howie continues his investigation, the devoutly Christian copper is continually appalled by the islanders practising of Pagan traditions, all of which seem to be building up to a ceremony in which a sacrifice is needed to bring renewed vitality to the islands fruit harvest.

The Wicker Man is often held up as a classic of British horror cinema, specifically a subgenre that writer/actor and horror fan Mark Gatiss dubbed “folk horror”, in which we find that supposedly
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Aussie director snares Kate Winslet and Kate Moss for new feature

Gabrielle Weller.

Australian director Gabrielle Weller has enlisted Kate Moss, Mick Jagger, Kate Winslet and Laura Bailey to star in her new documentary Never In, Never Out.

Weller is a writer, actor, director and producer..

In 2016 her schedule will find her on both sides of the globe.

This coming June, in the gold rush town of Ballarat, Weller will play the lead role in her first feature length film, Box, directed by Samuel O.Brien..

In August, she will return to London where she will direct Never In, Never Out, which she also wrote and produced, about the life of fashion designer Thea Porter. .

Weller said the two projects have provided a good contrast.

"They.re both challenging, but in completely different ways,. .she says.

Box, developed .by O.Brien is a poetic and surrealist screenplay, which is co-written by Weller. She will also take the lead role..

Box tells
See full article at IF.com.au »

James Bond Stars At Hollywood Collector's Show January 8-10

  • CinemaRetro
Numerous prominent stars from the James Bond films will be appearing this weekend at the Hollywood Collector's Show at Lax. James Bond himself, George Lazenby, will be there as well as some of the loveliest Bond ladies including Lana Wood, Luciana Paluzzi, Maryam d'Abo, Tanya Roberts, Diana Lee Hsu, Valerie Leon and Britt Ekland.  For info and tickets click here. 
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Examining Hollywood Remakes: The Wicker Man

  • Cinelinx
Hollywood is remake crazy these days, so Cinelinx is taking a look at what makes a good remake and what makes a bad one. We'll be examining examples of some cinematic remakes; some that work and some that don’t. In the second in our series articles, we look at a remake that definitely did Not work...The Wicker Man (2006)!

In the previous article, which looked at Rise of the Planet of the Apes, and discussed what makes a good remake: It has to pay homage to the original while also adding a new twist to an old idea. It needs to be part faithful and part innovative. Above all, of course, it should be a well-written, well-produced movie. The 2006 remake of the Wicker Man failed on all counts.

For those unfamiliar with the original 1973 British cult classic, it’s an eerie mystery/horror hybrid about a devoutly religious Christian police officer named Sergeant Howie,
See full article at Cinelinx »

A Look At Hollywood Remakes: Part 2- The Wicker Man

  • Cinelinx
With Hollywood studios being so remake crazy these days, Cinelinx takes a look at what makes a good remake and what makes a bad one, by examining examples of cinematic second attempts…some that work and some that don’t. In the second of several articles, we look at a remake that definitely did Not work…The Wicker Man (2006)!

As in the previous article on Rise of the Planet of the Apes, we discussed what makes a good remake: It has to pay homage to the original while also adding a new twist to an old idea. It needs to be part faithful and part innovative. It should also be a well-written, well-produced movie. The 2006 remake of the Wicker Man failed on all counts.

For those unfamiliar with the original 1973 British cult classic, it’s an eerie mystery/horror hybrid about a devoutly religious Christian police officer named Sergeant Howie,
See full article at Cinelinx »

‘The Man with the Golden Gun’ catches Bond in transition

The Man with the Golden Gun

Written by Richard Maibaum & Tom Mankiewicz

Directed by Guy Hamilton

UK, 1974

One hallmark of the venerable Bond franchise is its willingness to change with the times. Sometimes the changes feel organic, like the shift to a more brutish Daniel Craig after international terrorism took center stage in the early 2000’s. Other times, however, you can smell Bond’s desperation to stay relevant. Such is the case with 1974’s middling entry, The Man with the Golden Gun.

Guy Hamilton’s fourth turn as Bond director (Goldfinger, Diamonds Are Forever, Live and Let Die) is a study in uncertainty. As Bond, Roger Moore is still searching for the debonair persona he would find in the upcoming classic, The Spy Who Loved Me. Surrounding Moore’s tentative performance are a collection of unfocused action set pieces, a less-than-formidable duo of Bond girls, and the most repugnant character in the series’ history.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Raising Caine on TCM: From Smooth Gay Villain to Tough Guy in 'Best British Film Ever'

Michael Caine young. Michael Caine movies: From Irwin Allen bombs to Woody Allen classic It's hard to believe that Michael Caine has been around making movies for nearly six decades. No wonder he's had time to appear – in roles big and small and tiny – in more than 120 films, ranging from unwatchable stuff like the Sylvester Stallone soccer flick Victory and Michael Ritchie's adventure flick The Island to Brian G. Hutton's X, Y and Zee, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's Sleuth (a duel of wits and acting styles with Laurence Olivier), and Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men. (See TCM's Michael Caine movie schedule further below.) Throughout his long, long career, Caine has played heroes and villains and everything in between. Sometimes, in his worst vehicles, he has floundered along with everybody else. At other times, he was the best element in otherwise disappointing fare, e.g., Philip Kaufman's Quills.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

James Bond 007: Revisiting The Man With The Golden Gun

Roger Moore comes up against the excellent Christopher Lee in our look back at The Man With The Golden Gun...

The Film: Lousy, quite frankly. Throws away a brilliant premise and the best villain of the series. A decent if uninspiring first act slides into an utterly shambolic second. Clarity is left by the wayside, dignity jettisoned swiftly after. The Solex Agitator must be the dullest MacGuffin in cinema, the villain’s lair is a solar power plant operated by a single henchman (who looks highly unqualified in thermal energy). Potentially strong scenes are sabotaged by nonsensical additions: Goodnight in the wardrobe, the ‘whoop’ noise as the car corkscrews over the river.

The Villain: Destroys the received wisdom that a Bond film is measured by its antagonist. Were that the case, Golden Gun would be a stone cold classic. Francisco Scaramanga is the baddie benchmark. He is far more compelling
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Night They Raided Minsky’s | Blu-ray Review

Following his directorial debut, the 1967 Sonny and Cher vignette flick Good Times, director William Friedkin struggled through a couple of projects before landing his first really provocative title with 1970’s The Boys in the Band. Of course, following that would be The French Connection and so on and so forth. But prior to that, Friedkin helmed a period piece penned and produced by Norman Lear, The Night They Raided Minsky’s, which more or less depicts the accidental invention of stripping during the golden period of burlesque. Plagued by various production issues, including the death of Bert Lahr (you know him as the Cowardly Lion from The Wizard of Oz) during filming, the initial cut of the film was famously termed ‘disastrous,’ and the title would be retooled for nine months by editor Ralph Rosenblum and finally see release a year after production ended. While not quite charming or as
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
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