Feud (2017– )
8.6/10
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2 user 9 critic

The Other Woman 

With production on Baby Jane underway, Bette and Joan form an alliance, but outside forces conspire against them.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Peter
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Fred MacMurray
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Storyline

In 1970s interviews, Joan (Blondell) and Olivia continue to provide context into Joan (Crawford) and Bette's relationship, including that Jack put Joan under contract at Warner's (at a pittance) in the early 1940s solely to irk Bette, with the dynamic between the two and within Hollywood changing with Joan's success in Mildred Pierce (1945), after which it was Joan who got the plum roles and Bette largely the ones as housewives and slatterns. Back in 1962, filming on "Baby Jane" is well under way, and Joan and Bette are largely getting along as well as can be expected in their joint goal of making the movie a success and showing their joint dominance on the set. The latter issue does not sit well with Bob, as although he realizes he is considered a B-list director, he is still the director who should command the respect of his cast and crew. Both Jack and Hedda are miffed by the seeming cordiality between the two stars, Jack specifically who orders Bob to create emotional fireworks ... Written by Huggo

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Genres:

Biography | Drama

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TV-MA

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Release Date:

12 March 2017 (USA)  »

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16:9 HD
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Did You Know?

Connections

References Coming Home (1978) See more »

Soundtracks

I Know Why (And So Do You)
(uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Performed by Red Garland
[An instrumental version of the song is heard when Bette talks to Bob about her discussion with B.D.]
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User Reviews

 
Every woman has a soul
13 March 2017 | by See all my reviews

This episode theme I felt it was "Every woman has a soul" and the secondary being "Industry is cruel".

It was beautiful to see Joan and Davis get along for once and they were such a powerhouse together,almost if not more successful than each other in their prime and they demanded respect and outwitted their director but Jack Warner wanted attention and baited that poor excuse of a director with no sense of morality to do his dirty work,make his stars hate each other.While this made their performances stellar it crippled their souls and their lives with a little help from Davis's Hedda Hopper,another strong woman in Hollywood who got strong by creating feuds,destroying lives and make innocent people despicable but at the same time being one of the best journalists of the time.

Lange's Joan Crawford suffers this episode the loss of her current partner,which she did threw out,out of necessity and convenience.She manipulated Bette to team up with her against the young actress and to make the director get rid of her.She lets herself be played by Robert Aldrich into the Feud game and the fact she did not even check if the gossip about her did indeed came from Davis made me sad,proving sometimes she is a superficial woman,who did not care who created rumors about her as long as they were and who would not let that person get away with it.Her talk with Hedda,at her house made this scorpion sensible and shown she has a soul and that she is vulnerable despite seeming to be made out of ice cold rock.She wanted to hide everything about her private life from the public and let out just the powerful star that she used to be.

Sarandon's Bette Davis is the more sensible character this episode,for sure.She feels she has no place in the world,she wants to settle the initial scandal by inviting her co-star to dinner,she wants to not fade forever and to not be turned into a walking joke,a thing expected of someone of her caliber.Her scene where she losses her daughter out of her own greed for attention and the fact she as Jones has been doing since the begging:chose the career over everything else,it was strong because every word that came out of her daughter's mouth was true,the moral of that scene being"Leave while you have your dignity intact and while you still can."Everything bad that happened to her recently culminates on a love night with her director.

Stanley Tucci's Jack Warner is the classic,American magnate.He does not care what it takes to bring attention to his business,because he will do it and gladly because his title and career will only benefit,because he is not the front runner of the scandal and has his loyal employees to spread the dirt around.

Alfred Molina's Robert Aldrich is the a ping pong ball,that is both a pawn and a greedy man,who wants to come back in vogue while keeping his stars happy.He betrayed his wife,his dignity is gone,his soul was sold to the Warner Brothers,he has nothing left but to follow this path he has taken and hope for the better.

The side characters:Olivia the Havilland and Joan Blondell give us an insight of what Hollywood used to do and still does to get scandals going and their pictures the attention they need.They seem to point out that when women are manipulated against going out for each other,no one interferes,especially other women who enjoy their conflict and hope this will bring themselves more attention while their colleagues rip each other to pieces.


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