Timeshift (2002– )
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The Trains That Time Forgot: Britain's Lost Railway Journeys 

Author and railway enthusiast Andrew Martin travels the route of three famous named trains from bygone days, the Cornish Riviera Express, the Flying Scotsman, and the Brighton Belle, to ... See full summary »

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(as Merryn Threadgould)

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Andrew Martin ...
Jimmy James ...
Himself - Rail Enthusiast
Alan Bennett ...
Himself - Rail Historian
Bob Gwynne ...
Himself - Curator, National Railway Museum
Neil Marshall ...
Himself - Chairman, Brighton Belle Trust
Don Hitchens ...
Himself - Driver, The Brighton Belle
...
Himself (archive footage) (as Baron Olivier)
John Clements ...
Himself (archive footage) (as Sir John Clements CBE)
Joseph Wallace King ...
Himself (archive footage)
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Storyline

Author and railway enthusiast Andrew Martin travels the route of three famous named trains from bygone days, the Cornish Riviera Express, the Flying Scotsman, and the Brighton Belle, to examine why we used to name trains, and why express trains of today no longer provide the level of luxury VIP service that they used to. Written by Anonymous

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Genres:

Documentary

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Details

Release Date:

2 September 2015 (UK)  »

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Did You Know?

Goofs

When Andrew Martin is talking about the "Race to the North" between the LMS and the LNER railway companies, he correctly describes "the West Coast route" and "the East Coast route". A map is shown on which two routes are displayed. However the more westerly one is the Midland Main Line, which runs up the middle of the country, not the LNWR (West Coast) Main Line. LMS trains on the "Race to the North" always used the West Coast Main Line as it was quicker. See more »

Quotes

[excerpts of the film Get Carter are shown]
Andrew Martin: In the brilliant and brutal crime film of 1971, Get Carter, Michael Caine leaves London for Newcastle, probably travelling on the Flying Scotsman - well, it would be just like him to catch a named train rather than an anonymous one. He's behaving in a very civilised manner, reading Farewell My Lovely. We see him going to the Dining Car - they still existed in 1971. I think the director, Mike Hodges, is saying "Here is a man who does things correctly." ...
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Connections

Features The Flying Scotsman (1929) See more »

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