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Experimenter (2015)

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In 1961, famed social psychologist Stanley Milgram conducted a series of radical behavior experiments that tested ordinary humans' willingness to obey authority.

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4,989 ( 168)
1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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John Williams
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Miller
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James McDonough
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Alan Elms
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Alexandra 'Sasha' Milgram
Jason Black ...
Sasha's Suitor
Kyla Haggerty ...
Party Hostess
Danny A. Abeckaser ...
Braverman
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Taylor
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Bruno
Minnie ...
Elephant in the Room
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Whittaker
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Rensaleer
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Mrs. Lowe
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Storyline

Experimenter is based on the true story of famed social psychologist Stanley Milgram, who in 1961 conducted a series of radical behavior experiments that tested ordinary humans' willingness to obey by using electric shock. We follow Milgram, from meeting his wife Sasha through his controversial experiments that sparked public outcry. Written by ir

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Taglines:

Illusion sets the stage. Deception reveals the truth.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic material and brief strong language | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

16 October 2015 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Die Stanley Milgram Story  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$8,682 (USA) (16 October 2015)

Gross:

$155,075 (USA) (11 December 2015)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Peter Sarsgaard also appeared in "Kinsey"(2004) which was a film about another controversial researcher in the field of human behavior/psychology. See more »

Goofs

John Leguizamo is smoking Camel filters, which didn't exist until 1970. See more »

Quotes

Curtis: You forced people to torture other people.
Stanley Milgram: No.
Curtis: To see if they...
Stanley Milgram: No, no, no. That is alien to my view. No one was forced. The experimenter told the subject to perform an action. What happened between the command and the outcome is the individual, with conscience and a will, who can ether obey or disobey.
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Crazy Credits

A cast credit: "Elephant in the Room: Minnie" See more »

Connections

References The Tenth Level (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 (Ode To Joy)
composed by Ludwig van Beethoven
performed and arranged for steel drum by Ross Holcombe
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User Reviews

Compliance
5 June 2016 | by (Perth, Australia) – See all my reviews

Less a biopic of Stanley Milgram and more a reenactment of his behaviour experiments in the 1960s and a look at the controversy they sparked, 'Experimenter' offers a fascinatingly detailed account of contemporary history while also raising several intriguing questions about the way we as human beings function. It is quite a stylish film too and while some of the stylistic touches (green screen backgrounds; wandering elephants) offer more of a distraction than enhancement, Bryan Senti's music score is appropriately creepy and the film utilises a technique in which Milgram (played by Peter Sarsgaard) speaks to the audience to very good effect. While the film skims over Milgram's background and simplifies his interest in psychology to a fascination with Nazi control, we get an excellent insight into how Milgram constantly feels along the way with the ethics of his research put under the microscope. Sarsgaard is very good too, ageing a fair bit during the course of the film, and the distinct dearth of non-work scenes feels very much on point as we get the sense that Milgram was a man married to his work. The film also uses some dark humour to highlight the arguable detriments of dedicating one's every waking hour to one's work. In a memorable scene, a bunch of Milgram's student react nonchalantly to his announcement of the 1963 Kennedy assassination, not believing him for a second and instead trying to work out what reaction what Milgram must be looking for with the declaration of such news. It is a relevant point too; while ethical dilemmas exist when subjects do not realise that they are being experimented on, can behaviour ever really be analysed if participants on the flipside believe or know they are being experimented on?


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