7.5/10
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180 user 331 critic

A Monster Calls (2016)

Trailer
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A boy seeks the help of a tree monster to cope with his single mother's terminal illness.

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Writers:

(screenplay by), (based upon the novel written by) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
1,122 ( 125)
38 wins & 49 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
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Mum
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Dad
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Mr. Clark
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Oliver Steer ...
Sully
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...
Max Gabbay ...
Steven
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Lawyer
Max Golds ...
...
Lily's Mum
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Patrick Taggart ...
Teacher
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Storyline

The monster does not come walking often. This time it comes to Conor, and it asks for the one thing Conor cannot bring himself to do. Tell the truth. This is a very touching story about a boy who feels very damaged, guilty and mostly angry. He struggles at school with bullies, and pity looks from everyone, and at home with his mother's sickness. Will Conor overcome his problems? Will everything be okay? Will Conor be able to speak the truth?

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Courage conquers all. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic content and some scary images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

| |  »

Country:

| |

Language:

Release Date:

6 January 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Un monstruo viene a verme  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$43,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$30,909, 23 December 2016, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$3,730,982, 20 January 2017

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$40,919,166
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The novel was originally started by Siobhan Dowd who left it unfinished, at her death. Patrick Ness finished the book with credits to her idea. See more »

Goofs

When Conor and his dad have a conversation in the car, Conor's seat belt is on at first, disappears, and reappears a few times between shots. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Conor: [having a nightmare] Mama! Mama!
Conor: [waking] How does the story begin?
The Monster: It begins like so many stories. With a boy, too old to be a kid. Too young to be a man. And a nightmare.
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Connections

Featured in A Monster Calls: Making of the Tales (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Montage
(Feat. Felicity Jones)
Conducted by Fernando Velázquez
Performed by Basque Symphony Orchestra and Orfeón Donostiarra Choir
(p) 2016 Quartet Records
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Emotionally Honest
5 January 2017 | by See all my reviews

A Monster Calls is the rare movie geared toward a younger demographic which refuses to pull an emotional punch. The movie explicitly states that the protagonist, Connor O'Malley, is "too old to be a kid and too young to be a man". The introductory tagline is the perfect way to relay the film's tone to the audience. From the brutally honest acting to the gorgeously animated "stories", A Monster Calls allows raw emotion to emanate from the experience. Magic on the screen happens due to the unique specificity of our hurt hero. The fantastical elements found in a typical family movie organically merge with the painful reality of adulthood. For example, a fight will begin building up in Connor and the anger will call out the monster. The monster is never a simple vicarious outlet for the young adult. Instead, the monster is a well-executed manifestation of perceived guilt towards a deeper truth. Liam Neeson's monster revels in the humanity of the moment while also holding a magnifying glass up to it. Life continues to get worse for Connor and each appearance leads to a gradual slip of harsh reality. Refreshingly, A Monster Calls never hides that uncovering important personal insight is a painful process. The climax makes up for one of the most touching revelatory moments in modern cinema. The value of the film is revealed in how both children and adults in the audience gain a better understanding of the inherently personal nature of grief. The way we deal with a loss can come across as something else entirely for ourselves. A wide release of the film will hopefully begin to kindle in an audience a desire for introspective cinema. In a sense, specific scenarios are able to paradoxically tap into a universally human truth. Movies like A Monster Calls show a better alternative to the next soulless generic blockbuster movie.


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