Jappeloup (2013) - News Poster

(2013)

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Review: ‘The Innocents’ Is A Profound Meditation On A Forgotten Moment In History

  • Indiewire
Review: ‘The Innocents’ Is A Profound Meditation On A Forgotten Moment In History
When Anne Fontaine’s “The Innocents” made its debut at Sundance earlier this year, it was under the title “Agnus Dei,” referring to a liturgical chant that has been a part of Roman Catholic mass since the seventh century. The sentiment of the traditional chant is simple: “Lamb of God, you who take away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us. Lamb of God, you who take away the sins of the world, grant us peace.” For the haunted characters that inhabit Fontaine’s sensitive slice of forgotten history, that search for mercy and peace finds itself in some very unexpected places. And not all of them are touched by God.

Fontaine’s film tackles a fictionalized take on the story of Madeleine Pauliac (the film renames her Mathilde Beaulieu), a doctor and Resistance fighter who was a member of the French Red Cross during and after World War II.
See full article at Indiewire »

Christian Carion’s ‘Come What May’ Rolls Out Sales (Exclusive)

Christian Carion’s ‘Come What May’ Rolls Out Sales (Exclusive)
Paris – Acquired by Cohen Media Group for the U.S., the Pathe Intl.-sold “Come What May,” directed by France’s Christian Carion, (Oscar-nominated “Merry Christmas,” “Farewell”), one of France’s most ambitious historical filmmakers, has closed pre-sales and early sales.

Sales unveil comes as Pathe has announced a highlight of the 18th UniFrance Rendez-Vous, the French cinema showcase kicking off Jan. 14: A private visit on Jan. 15 of the Cezanne collection at Paris’ Orsay Museum to set in context “Cezanne et Moi,” directed by Daniele Thompson (). Starring Guillaume Gallienne (“Yves Saint Laurent,” “Me, Myself and Mum””) as Cezanne and Guillaume Canet (“Tell No One,” “Jappeloup”) as Emile Zola, his lifelong friend from the age of 13, “Cezanne et moi” is shaping up as one of Pathé’s big 2016 late summer big fest bets.

A father-son love story set against the Fall of France, when from May 1940 about eight million French
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Christian Carion’s ‘Come What May’ Rolls Out Sales

Christian Carion’s ‘Come What May’ Rolls Out Sales
Paris – Acquired by Cohen Media Group for the U.S., the Pathe Intl.-sold “Come What May,” directed by France’s Christian Carion, (Oscar-nominated “Merry Christmas,” “Farewell”), one of France’s most ambitious historical filmmakers, has closed pre-sales and early sales.

Sales unveil comes as Pathe has announced a highlight of the 18th UniFrance Rendez-Vous, the French cinema showcase kicking off Jan. 14: A private visit on Jan. 15 of the Cezanne collection at Paris’ Orsay Museum to set in context “Cezanne et Moi,” directed by Daniele Thompson (). Starring Guillaume Gallienne (“Yves Saint Laurent,” “Me, Myself and Mum””) as Cezanne and Guillaume Canet (“Tell No One,” “Jappeloup”) as Emile Zola, his lifelong friend from the age of 13, “Cezanne et moi” is shaping up as one of Pathé’s big 2016 late summer big fest bets.

A father-son love story set against the Fall of France, when from May 1940 about eight million French
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gaumont, Quad Reteam on Film Adaptation of Joseph Joffo’s ‘A Bag of Marbles’

Gaumont, Quad Reteam on Film Adaptation of Joseph Joffo’s ‘A Bag of Marbles’
Cannes– French major Gaumont is reteaming with Quad (“Intouchables,” “Ballerina”) on “A Bag of Marbles,” a big screen adaptation of Joseph Joffo’s “A Bag of Marbles,” a classic novel set in the backdrop of the second World War.

Based on Joffo’s own story,”A Bag of Marbles” is a colorful adventure tale chronicling the frenzied journey of two young Jewish brothers in German-occupied France who escape a roundup in Paris and embark on a trip across France to reunite with their family. Proving to be mischievous and brave, the two brothers manage to fend for themselves while escaping Nazi barbarism thanks to mind-boggling tricks.

Script is penned by Duguay and Benoit Guichard. Quad’s Laurent Zeitoun, Nicolas Duval and Yann Zeitoun are lead-producing. Gaumont is co-producing, handling international sales and will distribute the 23 million Euros movie in France.

Positioning “A Bag of Marbles” as a family-skewing movie, Gaumont
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gaumont Greenlights ‘Belle and Sebastien’ Sequel

Gaumont Greenlights ‘Belle and Sebastien’ Sequel
Paris– French major Gaumont is set to co-produce, distribute and sell “Belle and Sebastien, l’aventure continue,” the sequel to the hit family adventure pic.

Canadian helmer Christian Duguay (“Jappeloup”) will direct the sequel, which brings back together the screenwriters of the original movie, Juliette Sales and Fabien Suarez, and its cast, Félix Bossuet, Tchéky Karyo, Margaux Chatelier and Urbain Cancelier.

Acquired by U.S. distributor Film Movement, the original movie – based on Cecile Aubry’s children’s TV classic — was a box office hit in France, grossing over $23 million. It also sold to most key territories and performed strongly in many markets, including in Italy with Notorious, where it pulled nearly $10 million.

Directed by Nicolas Vanier, the $13 million “Belle and Sebastien” takes place in the French Alps, during WWII, and follows the adventures of a six-year-old motherless boy and his friend, a big white dog, as they thwart Nazi
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Breathe’

Film Review: ‘Breathe’
An obsessive friendship between two teenage girls unfolds with equal amounts of tenderness and terror in “Breathe,” a modest but acutely observed and affecting adolescent portrait that suggests a chaste “Blue Is a Warmest Color” by way of “Single White Female.” In her second outing as director (following 2011’s “The Adopted”), actress Melanie Laurent brings a sure, sensitive hand to tonally tricky material and draws superb work from relative newcomers Josephine Japy (“Cloclo”) and Lou De Laage (“Jappeloup”). Properly positioned, the pic could connect with younger female auds when it opens in Gaul Nov. 12. Offshore fests and arthouse distribs should also take note.

“Passion is harmful when it becomes obsessive, which is most of the time,” observes an enlightened high-school teacher early on in “Breathe,” amply setting the stage for much of what follows. One of those students listening semi-attentively is 17-year-old Charlene (Japy), who goes by Charlie and for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Montreal World Fest Includes 113 Int’l Premieres

Montreal World Fest Includes 113 Int’l Premieres
The Montreal World Film Festival announced its full slate of 432 films from around the globe on Tuesday, including 113 world or international feature preems. From the U.S. “The Red Robin” by Michael Z. Wechsler competes in the World section while Adam Rodgers’ “At Middleton” will unspool in the First World competition and Sam Fleischner’s “Stand Clear of the Closing Doors” plays in Focus on World Cinema.

This year’s world competition features 20 features and 11 shorts from 18 different countries. In all there are 113 world premieres, 39 North American preems and 41 Canadian bows.

Twenty helmers will screen their pics in a separate competition for first-time feature filmmakers. Organizers of the sprocket opera attribute the maelstrom of fresh talent to the industry’s digital evolution. Not a single 35 mm print was submitted for competition, and the increasing popularity of digital submissions invited more low-budget productions to toss their hat in the ring.

Other
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Montreal Film Festival Unveils Competition Lineup

Toronto -- The French equestrian drama Jappeloup from Quebec director Christian Duguay has been added to the competition lineup at the Montreal World Film Festival, which includes the previously announced U.S. title The Red Robin. Written by and starring Guillaume Canet, the French-Canadian period drama and Pathe release joins 19 other features in the world competition and festival lineup in Montreal, unveiled Tuesday. These include a slew of European films, including Gregor Schnitz' Spieltrieb, from Germany, and Westen, a Cold War drama by Christian Schwochow. Story: Montreal Festival Adds Judd Hirsch's 'The Red Robin' to Competition Slate France is

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Col*Coa: City of Lights City of Angels Free Closing Night Films + 2 April 22!

Col*Coa is winding down, but you can still catch a few stellar films and see the award winners for free Monday, April 22, 2013.

Award Screenings at 6:00 pm: The evening will start with the rerun of two awarded films in the Renoir and Truffaut Theaters at the DGA. Films will be announced on Sunday April 21 on the Col*Coa website, on Facebook, Twitter and on the Col•Coa info line (310) 289 5346. Free admission on a First comes First Served basis. No RSVP needed.

You can stay and also see the Closing Night Films at 8:30 pm at the DGA. Reservations needed. Those are both North American Premieres of two very anticipated French films. The thriller Moebus by Eric Rochant will show for free as will the comedy Like Brothers by Hugo Gélin.

Being among the French filmmakers (and I saw way too few of the films) gave me such a surprising sense of renewal - again because of this upcoming generation. After seeing City of Lights, the short by Pascal Tessaud which preceded the classic Jacques Demy film Bay of Angels starring a platinum blond gambling-addicted Jeanne Moreau in Cannes, Nice and Monte Carlo in 1963, we spoke at length about what is called "The New Vibe". City of Lights stars a deeply quiet young man from "les banlieus", the notorious "suburbs" surrounding Paris where the international mix of young (and old) proletariat population is invisible to the rest of France except when the anger erupts into riots. This first generation has the French education but not the money or jobs and it hurts. They have picked up the cameras and with no money are creating films which express their lives in many ways like the new Latin American filmmakers or the new Eastern European filmmakers. Tessaud gave me an entire education in the hour we talked and I will share this in time. For now, aside from his wonderfuly trenchant film which played like a feature, which captured the Paris this young generation recognizes as The City of Lights - dancing, the kitchen of a very upscale restaurant, the dreary streets filled with construction, there is another example of The New Vibe, started by Rachid Djaïdani (a story in himself) the film Hold Back (Rengaine) leads the pack of the 20-some-odd new films of The New Vibe. It is produced by Anne-Dominque Toussaint (Les Films des Tournelles) whose films are too numerous to name but include my favorite The Hedgehog which I wrote about at Col*Coa two years ago, Col*Coa's current Cycling with Moliere, 2002's Respiro and many many others. Hold Back took 9 years to make and most of the team was unpaid. The New Vibe makes films without the aid of the French system of funding; it is more guerilla-style, not New Wave, not Dogma but New Vibe. Hold Back took Cannes by storm when it showed last year in Directors Fortnight and went on to New Directors/ New Films in New York. The classic story of a Catholic and a Muslim who want to marry but whose family objects, this rendition the Juliet has a brother who marches throughout Paris to alert her 39 other brothers that she wants to marry outside her cultural and religious traditions. "This fresh debut mixes fable, plucky social commentary - particularly about France's Arab community - and inventive comic setpieces" (Col*Coa)

Hold Back (Rengaine) (Isa: Pathe) goes beyond the funny but "establishmant" film Intouchable which played here last year. It is the exact opposite of such films as Sister or even Aliyah (Isa: Rezo) which played here this year and also in Directors Fortnight last year. Aliyah is about a young French Jewish man who must make his last drug sale in order to escape his brother's destructive behavior. He escapes by immigrating to Israel. These films are made by filmmakers within the French establishment and describe a proletariat existence which exists in their bourgeois minds. They lack a certain "verite" which can only be captured by one who knows viscerally what such marginal existence is.

At the opposite end of the contemporary spectrum of films today, a real establishment film is You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet by Alain Renais (you have to be a Renais fan to love it who was so avant-garde in his day). Those old New Wave films one could see here stand out in beautiful contrast to today's New Vibe: Renais' Stavisky or the 1963 film The Fire Within (Le feu follet) by Louis Malle again starring the beautiful Jeanne Moreau. I missed them both to my regret. When I miss a film I always tell myself I can see it when it's released or on DVD or Mubi, but rarely do I get to see it. Instead I can only read about it as here written up by Beth Hanna on Indiewire blog ToH. The Fire Within was part of Wes Anderson's choices, one of the various showcases of Col*Coa. Says Hanna: "Anderson's taste is impeccable: He has selected Louis Malle's 1963 lyrical depression drama The Fire Within." It was made after the classic Elevator to the Gallows (1958) which Miles Davis scored and which also starred the young Jeanne Moreau. She also could be seen her in Col*Coa in the classic 1963 Jacques Demy-directed Bay of Angels.

Col*Coa really offered something for everyone this year. Another of my favorite film genres, the Jewish film, was represented by Aliyah and The Dandelions (Du Vent dans mes mollets) (Isa: Gaumont), Stavisky, and It Happened in St. Tropez (Isa: Pathe), a classic French comedy -- though a bit dark and yet still comedic, about romance, love and marriage switching between generations in a neurotic, comfortably wealthy Jewish family. The Dandelions was, according to my friend Debra Levine, a writer on culture including film and dance, (see her blog artsmeme), "darling, so touching, so well made, so creative ... i really liked it. Went into that rabbit hole of little girls together ... Barbie doll play. Crazy creative play. As looney as kids can be."

Ian Birnie's favorite film was Becoming Traviata. Greg Katchel's favorite originally was Rendez-vous à Kiruna by Anna Novion, but when I saw him later in the festival his favorite was Cycling with Moliere (Alceste a bicyclette) (Isa: Pathe), again produced by Anne-Dominque Toussaint and directed by Philippe Le Guay who directed one of my favorites, The Women on the 6th Floor. Greg also liked Three Worlds though it was a bit "schematic" in depicting the clash of different cultures which were also shown in Hold Back.

Of the few films I was able to see, the most interesting was Augustine by Alice Winokur. It is the French response to David Cronenberg's A Dangerous Method and the British film Hysteria. All three were about the turn of the century concern of psychologists or doctors with female hysteria. This one concerned Jean-Martin Charcot and the neurologist's belief that hysteria was a neurological disease and he used hypnosis to get at its roots, whild in A Dangerous Method it was seen by Freud and Jung as a mental disorder and in Hysteria by Tanya Wexler (Tiff 2011) in which Dr. Mortimer Granville devises the invention of the first vibrator in the name of medical science.

Take a look at Indiewire's own article here for more on Los Angeles's greatest French attraction, the second largest French film festival in the world.

Several American distributors will present their films at Col•Coa before their U.S. release: Kino Lorber – You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet, co-written and directed by Alain Resnais (Focus on a Filmmaker); Mpi Media – Thérèse, the last film of director/co-writer Claude Miller starring Audrey Tautou; Cohen Media Group – In the House, written and directed by François Ozon and The Attack, co-written and directed by Ziad Doueiri; Distrib Films for two documentaries: Becoming Traviata and The Invisibles; Film Movement for two thrillers: Aliyah and Three Worlds; The Weinstein Company - Populaire.

Below you can see the international sales agents for the current features showing.

11.6 / 11.6 (Isa: Wild Bunch)

Directed by: Philippe Godeau

Written by: Philippe Godeau, Agnès De Sacy

A Few Hours Of Spring / Quelques heures de printemps (Isa: Rezo)

Directed by: Stéphane Brizé

Written by: Stéphane Brizé, Florence Vignon

Cast: Vincent Lindon, Hélène Vincent, Emmanuelle Seigner, Olivier Perrier

Aliyah/Alyah ✡ (Isa: Rezo, U.S.: Film Movement

Directed by: Élie Wajeman

Written by: Élie Wajeman, Gaëlle Macé

Armed Hands / Mains armées (Isa: Films Distribution)

Directed by: Pierre Jolivet

Written by: Pierre Jolivet, Simon Michaël

Augustine / Augustine (Isa: Kinology, U.S.: Music Box)

Directed by: Alice Winocour

Written by: Alice Winocour

Aya Of Yop City / Aya de Yopougon (Isa: TF1)

Directed by: Clément Oubrerie, Marguerite Abouet

Written by: Marguerite Abouet

Bay Of Angels / La Baie des anges (U.S.: Criterion)

Directed by: Jacques Demy

Written by: Jacques Demy

Becoming Traviata /Traviata et nous (Isa: Films Boutique, U.S. Distrib Films and Cinema Guild)

Directed by: Philippe Béziat

Written by: Philippe Béziat

Cycling With MOLIÈRE / Alceste à bicyclette (Isa: Pathe)

Directed by: Philippe Le Guay

Written by: Philippe Le Guay, based on an original idea by Fabrice Luchini and Philippe Le Guay

Fly Me To The Moon / Un plan parfait (Isa: Kinology)

Directed By: Pascal Chaumeil

Written By: Laurent Zeitoun, Yoann Gromb, Philippe Mechelen

Haute Cuisine / Les Saveurs du palais (Isa: Wild Bunch, U.S.: The Weinstein Company)

Directed by: Christian Vincent

Written by: Etienne Comar & Christian Vincent, based on the life of Danièle Mazet-Delpeuch

Hidden Beauties / Mille-Feuille (Isa: Other Angle Pictures)

Directed by: Nouri Bouzid

Written by: Nouri Bouzid, Joumène Limam

Hold Back / Rengaine (Isa: Pathe)

Directed by: Rachid Djaïdani

Written by: Rachid Djaïdani

In The House / Dans la maison (Isa: Wild Bunch, U.S.: Cohen Media Group)

Directed by: François Ozon

Written by: François Ozon

It Happened In Saint-tropez / Des Gens qui s’embrassent (Isa: Pathe)

Directed by: Danièle Thompson

Written by: Danièle Thompson, Christopher Thompson

Jappeloup/ Jappeloup (Isa: Pathe)

Directed by: Christian Duguay

Written by: Guillaume Canet

Le Grand Soir / Le grand soir (Isa: Funny Balloons)

Directed by: Benoît Delépine and Gustave de Kervern

Written by: Benoît Delépine and Gustave de Kervern

Little Lion / Comme un Lion (Isa: Pyramide)

Directed by: Samuel Collardey

Written by: Catherine Paillé, Nadège Trebal, Samuel Collardey

Moon Man / Jean de la lune (Isa: Le Pacte)

Directed By: Stephan Schesch

Written By: Stephan Schesch, Ralph Martin. Based on the book by: Tomi Ungerer

Populaire / Populaire (Isa: Wild Bunch, U.S.: TWC)

Directed By: Régis Roinsard

Written By: Régis Roinsard, Daniel Presley, Romain Compingt

Rendezvous In Kiruna / Rendez-vous à Kiruna (Isa: Pyramide)

Directed by: Anne Novion ♀

Written by: Olivier Massart, Anne Novion, Pierre Novion

Sons Of The Wind / Les Fils du vent (Isa: Wide)

Directed by: Bruno Le Jean

Written by: Bruno Le Jean

Stavisky / Stavisky (1974) (Isa: StudioCanal)

Directed by: Alain Resnais

Written by: Jorge Semprún

The Attack / L’Attentat

France, Belgium, Lebanon, Qatar, 2013

Directed by: Ziad Doueiri (Isa: Wild Bunch, U.S.: Cohen Media Group)

The BRONTË Sisters / Les Soeurs Brontë (Isa: Gaumont, U.S.: Cohen Media Group)

Directed by: André Téchiné

Written by: André Téchiné, Jean Gruault, Pascal Bonitzer

The Dandelions / Du Vent dans mes mollets ✡

Directed By: Carine Tardieu

Written By: Carine Tardieu, Raphaële Moussafir, Olivier Beer

The Fire Within / Le Feu Follet (1963) (Isa: Pyramide, U.S.: Janus Films)

Directed by: Louis Malle

Written by: Louis Malle

The Invisibles / Les Invisibles (Isa: Doc & Film, U.S. Distrib Films))

Directed By: Sébastien Lifshitz

The Man Who Laughs/ L’Homme qui rit (Isa: EuropaCorps)

Directed by: Jean-Pierre Améris

Written by: Jean-Pierre Améris , Guillaume Laurant

THÉRÈSE / Thérèse Desqueyroux (Isa: TF1, U.S.: Mpi)

Directed by: Claude Miller

Written by: Claude Miller, Natalie Carter

Three Worlds / Trois mondes (Isa: Pyramide, U.S.: Film Movement)

Directed by: Catherine Corsini

Written by: Catherine Corsini, Benoît Graffin

To Our Loves / À nos amours (1983) (U.S. Janus)

Directed By: Maurice Pialat

Written By: Arlette Langmann, Maurice Pialat

True Friends / Amitiés sincères (Isa: Snd Groupe 6)

Directed By: Stéphan Archinard, François Prévôt-Leygonie

Written By: Stéphan Archinard, François Prévôt-Leygonie, Marie-Pierre Huster

Welcome To Argentina / Mariage à Mendoza (Isa: Kinology)

Directed By: Édouard Deluc

Written By: Anaïs Carpita, Édouard Deluc, Thomas Lilti, Philippe Rebbot

What’S In A Name / Le prénom (Isa: Pathe, U.S. Under The Milky Way)

Directed by: Alexandre de La Patellière, Matthieu Delaporte

Written by: Alexandre de La Patellière, Matthieu Delaporte

You Ain’T Seen Nothin’ Yet / Vous n’avez encore rien vu (Isa: StudioCanal, U.S.: Kino Lorber)

Directed By: Alain Resnais

Written By: Alain Resnais, Laurent Herbiet
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Marion Cotillard Cuddles and Kisses Marcel at Husband Guillaume's Horse Show

  • Popsugar
Marion Cotillard Cuddles and Kisses Marcel at Husband Guillaume's Horse Show
Marion Cotillard planted a sweet kiss on her son Marcel's cheek while cheering on Guillaume Canet at the International Jump Bost in Barbizon, France, on Sunday. Marion and Marcel cuddled to keep warm during the sweet outing, where they watched Guillaume show off his skills on his horse. She returned to her native France for the family fun following a recent trip to Tokyo, where she donned a Christian Dior gown for an event to promote her film Rust and Bone at the end of last month. Earlier, Marion showed support for her husband when she attended Guillaume's Paris premiere of his film Jappeloup back in February. View Slideshow ›
See full article at Popsugar »

Jappeloup: Film Review

Jappeloup: Film Review
Paris -- Part inspirational sports movie, part bromance between a guy and his prize-winning horse, the French equestrian drama Jappeloup manages to clear several, though not all, of the hurdles of your typical against-all-odds athletics flick, offering up a rather classic mix of stunts and sentiment before galloping ahead to its stirring equine finale. Written by and starring Guillaume Canet (Tell No One, the upcoming Blood Ties), this polished period drama from Quebecois director Christian Duguay (The Art of War) indulges in a tad too much slow-motion and schmaltz, but otherwise provides a diverting, at times engaging

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Marion Cotillard Shows Her Support For Guillaume at His Paris Premiere

  • Popsugar
Marion Cotillard Shows Her Support For Guillaume at His Paris Premiere
Marion Cotillard stepped out to support her partner, Guillaume Canet, at his premiere of Jappeloup in Paris yesterday. She smiled and posed solo while Guillaume linked up for photos with his costars from the film, which he wrote. Marion has been busy with her own work recently, and her schedule isn't slowing down. Marion signed on to star in Two Days, One Night and will begin filming in Belgium this Summer. She'll also hit the big screen in her latest, Blood Ties, which Guillaume directed, in the coming months. It's been a big year for Marion, who was recently honored for her work at the César Awards. Marion donned a black and white Christian Dior gown to step out for the French award ceremony. She was nominated for best actress for her work in Rust and Bone, but she ultimately lost out to Amour's Emmanuelle Riva. View Slideshow ›
See full article at Popsugar »

Watch: Trailer For Equestrian Drama 'Jappeloup' Starring Guillaume Canet & Daniel Auteuil

  • The Playlist
Way back in the summer of 2011 it was reported that veteran Daniel Auteuil would star opposite “Tell No One” and "Little White Lies" helmer/actor Guillaume Canet in the Olympic equestrian drama “Jappeloup.” And though it’s taken a while, we finally have our first look at the film. An unsubtitled French trailer for the picture has appeared online -- find your nearest French speaker -- and it looks fitfully stirring and doesn’t betray any hint of director Christian Duguay’s previous efforts, which include everything from “Scanners III: The Takeover” to the 2000 Wesley Snipe vehicle “The Art Of War.” And even if the helmer doesn’t have the steadiest of hands, you can rest easy knowing that Canet himself has written the film, which is based on the true story of French jockey Pierre Durand, who in 1998 nursed a small black horse, the titular Jappeloup, from injury to
See full article at The Playlist »

Key Players in the 2012 Cannes Film Market: Pathe International

  • ioncinema
Unless you count Roman Polanski’s Tess as a significant invite, Pathe International is pretty much relegated to market screenings, but this week it was announced that Denis Villeneuve’s An Enemy to be shot in Toronto with Jake Gyllenhaal, so it looks like there is definitely something to look forward to with this French sales co.

An Enemy by Denis Villeneuve

Beauty And The Beast (La Belle Et La BÊTE) by Christophe Gans

Jappeloup by Christian Duguay

Alceste A Bicyclette by Philippe Le Guay

Bowling by Marie-Castille Mention Schaar

Happiness Never Comes Alone (Un Bonheur N’Arrive Jamais Seul) by James Huth

Houba! On The Trail Of The Marsupilami (Sur La Piste Du Marsupilami) by Alain Chabat

It Happened In Saint Tropez (Des Gens Qui S’Embrassent) by Danièle Thompson

Last Passenger by Omid Nooshin

My Best Holidays (Nos Plus Belles Vacances) by Philippe Lellouche

No One Lives by Ryuhei Kitamura

Sea,
See full article at ioncinema »

See also

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