Marius (2013) - News Poster

(2013)

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Remembering Delorme Pt. II: Actress Starred in French Blockbuster Bigger Than 'Star Wars'

Danièle Delorme and Jean Gabin in 'Deadlier Than the Male.' Danièle Delorme movies (See previous post: “Danièle Delorme: 'Gigi' 1949 Actress Became Rare Woman Director's Muse.”) “Every actor would like to make a movie with Charles Chaplin or René Clair,” Danièle Delorme explains in the filmed interview (ca. 1960) embedded further below, adding that oftentimes it wasn't up to them to decide with whom they would get to work. Yet, although frequently beyond her control, Delorme managed to collaborate with a number of major (mostly French) filmmakers throughout her six-decade movie career. Aside from her Jacqueline Audry films discussed in the previous Danièle Delorme article, below are a few of her most notable efforts – usually playing naive-looking young women of modest means and deceptively inconspicuous sexuality, whose inner character may or may not match their external appearance. Ouvert pour cause d'inventaire (“Open for Inventory Causes,” 1946), an unreleased, no-budget comedy notable
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Polyson Unveils New Video and Sound Post-production Facility in East Paris

Polyson Unveils New Video and Sound Post-production Facility in East Paris
On January 5, French post-production house Polyson garnered the coveted César & Techniques Award from a shortlist of six companies. The winner of theaward is determined through voting by the members of France’s Académie des Arts et Techniques du Cinéma, which organizes the main Cesars Awards ceremony in February.

Now in 2015, Polyson is unveiling major new facilities, including a Foley studio, a pre-mix studio and seven new image and sound editing rooms, covering a total area of 6500 square feet, including a 1100-square-foot Foley studio with a 16-foot ceiling height.

The Foley studio alone represents a total investment of €6 million ($ 6.8 million) and is intended to reinforce the company’s positioning as a provider of high-end video and sound post-production services.

Founded in 2000, Polyson aims to provide a one-stop shop, spanning video editing and all aspects of sound post-production. The company is located in East Paris, in the 20th arrondissement, near Nation, in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Ariane’s Thread’

Film Review: ‘Ariane’s Thread’
For more than 30 years, Robert Guediguian and his merry band of loyal actors made deeply humanistic films set among Marseille’s working class — sunlit, somewhat fanciful variations on Ken Loach’s grittier oeuvre. But as the bonds of worker solidarity have grown increasingly fragile, the director has transported his repertory of regulars into other times and spaces and, in “Ariane’s Thread,” squarely into dreamland. Though this joyful proletarian commedia dell’arte lacks the mythical dimension of Renoir’s “Golden Coach” or Fellini’s “8½,” and is unlikely even to enjoy the popularity of Guediguian’s “Marius and Jeanette” (1997), the helmer’s fans will not be disappointed.

Seemingly abandoned by friends and family on her birthday, Ariane (the helmer’s lifelong partner and muse, Ariane Ascaride), leaves her suburban apartment and winds up, sans money or phone, in a picturesque seaside restaurant. The place caters to an elderly clientele of habitués
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Fanny | Review

  • ioncinema
Fanny Feast: Auteuil’s Underwhelming Trilogy Continues

The mid-section of his Pagnol tribute, Fanny promises to give us the female perspective in the crossed lover’s situation established in preceding chapter, Marius. But just as the opening portion revolved at needless length around an eponymous character who is given little more to do than moon over finding his dream job on a big boat, the next segment feels more of a weary inevitability of the morose narrative than rather than signaling a differing viewpoint.

While Alexandre Desplat’s score dips less uneasily into insistent whimsicality in this more serious minded portion, it’s still more of a sycophantic simper than anything adroitly engaging with the material at hand. One can assume the final segment, Cesar, will suffer from the same slights, but unfortunately Auteuil’s extreme respect (and unnecessary proximity) in his adaptation of Pagnol’s material is exactly what
See full article at ioncinema »

Colcoa 2014 Lineup Includes New Films from Polanski, Breillat, Ozon and More (Trailers)

Colcoa 2014 Lineup Includes New Films from Polanski, Breillat, Ozon and More (Trailers)
The Franco-American Cultural Fund has announced the lineup for the 18th edition of the City of Lights, City of Angels (Colcoa) film festival. Running April 21-28 at the Directors Guild of America in Los Angeles, the fest will present 41 features, including three international premieres, and many North American and Us premieres. (Trailers below.) The opening night film is "We Love You, You Bastard," the new film from director Claude Lelouch ("A Man and a Woman") starring Johnny Hallyday and Sandrine Bonnaire. The closing night double bill, on April 28, will be announced during the festival. Other notable films on the lineup include Roman Polanski's Best Director Cesar-winning "Venus in Fur," Catherine Breillat's latest collaboration with Isabelle Huppert "Abuse of Weakness" and Francois Ozon's "Young and Beautiful," with Charlotte Rampling. Films "Marius" and "Fanny" by French actor Daniel Auteuil ("Cache") will also make their way to the fest, along with "Jacky in the.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Adele leads France's Lumière Awards

Adele leads France's Lumière Awards
Kechiche’s Adele wins best film and best director. Best francophone, foreign film goes to Ayouch’s Horses Of God.

Abdellatif Kechiche’s Adele: Chapters 1 & 2 (aka Blue is the Warmest Colour) was the top winner at the Lumière Awards, France’s version of the Golden Globes judged by the international press community in Paris, on Monday evening (20).

Kechiche’s passionate lesbian love story, which has ignited the public and critics at home and abroad, clinched best film and best director.

The special jury prize went to Rebecca Zlotowski’s gritty romance Grand Central, set against the backdrop of a nuclear power station.

Other titles in the running for best film included 9-Month Stretch, Grand Central, Mood Indigo, Quai d’Orsay and Renoir.

The previous two winners of best film at the Lumières, The Artist and Amour, went on to triumph at the Oscars. Adele, however, was not submitted for Academy Awards consideration. France instead
See full article at ScreenDaily »

French Lumières fall for Adele

French Lumières fall for Adele
Kechiche’s Adele wins best film and best director. Best francophone, foreign film goes to Ayouch’s Horses Of God.

Abdellatif Kechiche’s Adele: Chapters 1 & 2 was the top winner at the Lumière Awards, France’s version of the Golden Globes judged by the international press community in Paris, on Monday evening (20).

Kechiche’s passionate lesbian love story, which has ignited the public and critics at home and abroad, clinched best film and best director.

The special jury prize went to Rebecca Zlotowski’s gritty romance Grand Central, set against the backdrop of a nuclear power station.

Other titles in the running for best film included 9-Month Stretch, Grand Central, Mood Indigo, Quai d’Orsay and Renoir.

The previous two winners of best film at the Lumières, The Artist and Amour, went on to triumph at the Oscars. Adele, however, was not submitted for Academy Awards consideration. France instead put Renoir forward this year.

In other prizes
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Leviathan, Saving Mr Banks, Carrie: this week's new films

Leviathan | Saving Mr Banks | Carrie | Jeune & Jolie | Marius, Fanny | Saving Santa | The Best Man Holiday | Free Birds | Day Of The Flowers | Life's A Breeze

Leviathan (12A)

(Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Véréna Paravel, 2012, Fra/UK/Us) 87 mins

An arthouse fishing-trawler documentary sounds like a practical joke, but this takes us to places we've never before – into the ocean depths and back out on to the decks with the catch. It's a series of dark, semi-abstract tableaux full of flapping fish, clanking machinery and tattooed fishermen doing wet, gory work. It's easy to forget this is real life you're watching.

Saving Mr Banks (PG)

(John Lee Hancock, 2013, Us) Tom Hanks, Emma Thompson. 125 mins

How Walt Disney came to make Mary Poppins was hardly a pressing movie mystery, and one suspects a spoonful of drama has been added, but the leads are eminently watchable.

Carrie (15)

(Kimberly Peirce, 2013, Us) Chloë Grace Moretz, Julianne Moore. 100 mins

Brian De Palma
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

French Film Festival UK to open with Chomet

  • ScreenDaily
French Film Festival UK to open with Chomet
This year’s French Film Festival UK, celebrating its 21st edition, will present Sylvain Chomet’s Attila Marcel as its opening night gala.

The touring event, founded in Scotland, will welcome Chomet to screenings in London, Edinburgh and Glasgow of his first live-action film. His producer Claudie Ossard will also attend.

Attila Marcel, which premiered in Toronto, is about a mute young man being raised by his accentric aunts; a neighbour gives him a magical potion that unlocks his repressed childhood memories.

Richard Mowe, director and co-founder of the Festival, said: “We are delighted that Sylvain who continues as patron of the event, will come back with such a wonderful gift. When we saw him at the ceremony for his honorary degree he promised we would have the premiere of his new film - and he has been as good as his word. We are hosting a gala party for him and the film at the Caledonian
See full article at ScreenDaily »

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