Mon meilleur ami (2006) - News Poster

(I) (2006)

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Wes Anderson’s remake of My Best Friend gets a name

As we told you before , Wes Anderson has already decided on his next script, a retelling of the 2006 French film Mon Meilleur Ami (My Best Friend). Anderson’s version of the story will be called The Rosenthaler Suite. There is no official word that he will be directing the project.

Read more on Wes Anderson’s remake of My Best Friend gets a name…
See full article at GordonandtheWhale »

Wes Anderson's next script The Rosenthaler Suite gets reviewed

Wes Anderson is like the Sex Pistols for me in that I may not listen to their stuff that much anymore, but it would be pretty dumb to downplay their importance to the evolution of popular music history. So like the Sex Pistols, I'll always have a soft spot for Anderson's work no matter how my tastes shift.

This is probably why after reading an interesting mini-review of Anderson's latest screenplay, The Rosenthaler Suite, which is an adaptation of Patrice Leconte's 2006 French film, Mon Meilleur Ami ("My Best Friend"), over at The Playlist, I thought I'd help bring it to everyone's attention.

The word on the script is mostly good, though the reviewer admits Anderson's obsession with wardrobe and style minutia "can be stifling," and that the first half of the script feels a lot like his Darjeeling Limited era. He suggests handing it over to someone like Roman
See full article at QuietEarth »

Johnny Depp is the New Tom Hanks. Trade Roughage 09/10/08

  • Spout
Wes Anderson has been hired out by Universal/Imagine to script a remake of Patrice Leconte's Mon Meilleur Ami (My Best Friend), about a cabby hired out to pose as Daniel Auteuil's pal. If Anderson also directs the film, I can see Bill Murray as either role, but let me suggest that the other be played by Richard Dreyfuss for a perfect What About Bob? reunion. Pirates of the Caribbean collaborators Gore Verbinski and Johnny Depp are apparently going the way of Robert Zemeckis and Tom Hanks, but better, for a computer-animated film titled Rango< ...
See full article at Spout »

Wes Anderson's Next!

  • JoBlo
Wes Anderson is known for his completely original scripts, idiosyncratic little ditties that can charm even the most hardened of souls. It comes as somewhat of a surprise then, to learn that Anderson is tapped to write My Best Friend, a remake of the 2006 Patrice Leconte-directed French comedy Mon Meilleur Ami. Apparently Anderson is also interested in directing the film, which centers around a cranky antiques dealer who learns at a dinner with his closest friends that none of them actually...
See full article at JoBlo »

IFC, Leconte 'Friends' for distrib'n

IFC, Leconte 'Friends' for distrib'n
ORLANDO -- IFC Films has acquired all U.S. rights to Patrice Leconte's French comedy My Best Friend (Mon meilleur ami), starring Daniel Auteuil.

The feature, which had its world premiere as a gala presentation in September at the Toronto International Film Festival, follows an unlikable antique dealer (Auteuil) who falsely claims to have a best friend. When his skeptical business partner (Julie Gayet) doubts he has any at all and challenges him to arrange an introduction, he frantically seeks out the help of an outgoing taxi driver (Dany Boon) to learn how to make a friend.

" 'My Best Friend' will appeal to the masses and be supported with an impressive level of marketing and distribution expertise," said IFC Entertainment president Jonathan Sehring, who had the option to acquire the film for his IFC First Take day-and-date program but chose the IFC division known for bigger releases. "This acquisition further exemplifies our commitment to aggressively growing our theatrical release slate for 2007 with larger, commercial films."

Leconte's films have been a proven draw in a tough domestic market for foreign films. His credits include 1989's Monsieur Hire, 1996's Ridicule and 2004's Intimate Strangers (Confidences trop intimes).

The film was produced by Olivier Delbose and Marc Missonnier through their Fidelite Prods., and co-produced by TF1 Film Prods., Wild Bunch and Lucky Red. Leconte wrote the original screenplay with Olivier Dazat and Jerome Tonnerre.

IFC, Leconte 'Friends' for distrib'n

IFC, Leconte 'Friends' for distrib'n
ORLANDO -- IFC Films has acquired all U.S. rights to Patrice Leconte's French comedy My Best Friend (Mon meilleur ami), starring Daniel Auteuil.

The feature, which had its world premiere as a gala presentation in September at the Toronto International Film Festival, follows an unlikable antique dealer (Auteuil) who falsely claims to have a best friend. When his skeptical business partner (Julie Gayet) doubts he has any at all and challenges him to arrange an introduction, he frantically seeks out the help of an outgoing taxi driver (Dany Boon) to learn how to make a friend.

" 'My Best Friend' will appeal to the masses and be supported with an impressive level of marketing and distribution expertise," said IFC Entertainment president Jonathan Sehring, who had the option to acquire the film for his IFC First Take day-and-date program but chose the IFC division known for bigger releases. "This acquisition further exemplifies our commitment to aggressively growing our theatrical release slate for 2007 with larger, commercial films."

Leconte's films have been a proven draw in a tough domestic market for foreign films. His credits include 1989's Monsieur Hire, 1996's Ridicule and 2004's Intimate Strangers (Confidences trop intimes).

The film was produced by Olivier Delbose and Marc Missonnier through their Fidelite Prods., and co-produced by TF1 Film Prods., Wild Bunch and Lucky Red. Leconte wrote the original screenplay with Olivier Dazat and Jerome Tonnerre.

'Bella' Scoops Top Award In Toronto

  • WENN
'Bella' Scoops Top Award In Toronto
A first-time director from Mexico has shocked critics by picking up the top award at this year's Toronto Film Festival in Canada for his romantic drama Bella. Alejandro Gomez Monteverde, 29, was voted favorite by movie-goers and his film scooped the prestigious People's Choice award on Saturday. The stunned director said, "I really hope that this is not a dream and that I don't wake up at film school. This festival is my first festival, it's my first film, it's my first everything." Bella beat out stiff competition from Patrice Leconte's Mon Meilleur Ami and the politically charged Dixie Chicks: Shut Up And Sing. The critics' best film prize went to the controversial mock documentary Death Of A President, which imagines the assassination of Us President George W. Bush. The jury said it was noted "for the audacity with which it distorts reality to reveal a larger truth."

My Best Friend

My Best Friend
TORONTO -- Director Patrice Leconte has declared he no longer wants to do "overly serious movies" and that after three more films he will discontinue making films altogether. My Best Friend is the discouraging result of these twin decisions to downshift. One looks to Leconte for some of the finest, most sophisticated and compassionate filmmaking coming out of France, not for a situation comedy.

My Best Friend is not a bad film and veteran star Daniel Auteuil makes any film he inhabits an interesting place to visit. Perversely, its tissue-thin substance may even make the comedy more commercial in North America than such films of his as Monsieur Hire and Ridicule.

However, there is within the premise of My Best Friend a much better film than Leconte and his co-writer Jerome Tonnerre (working from Olivier Dazat's story) came up with. The situation is this: A busy antiques dealer, Francois (Auteuil), is so lost in his work that he is shocked to realize he has absolutely no friends. At a birthday dinner with acquaintances, everyone makes it clear none of them likes him.

Chagrined, Francois insists he has a best friend. When challenged by his associate, Catherine (Julie Gayet), he is forced to make a wager -- over a super-expensive Greek vase he just purchased at auction -- that he can produce a best friend within 10 days.

So all Francois has to do is learn how to make friends and, crucially, to make a "best friend." His solution is immediately apparent to any viewer but not, at least initially, to Francois. Early in the movie, he keeps running into a gregarious cabbie named Bruno (Dany Boon), a talkative man with a mania for trivia that makes everyone around him slightly nuts. Eventually, Francois does notice how easily Bruno makes friends with strangers so he enlists Bruno to teach him the social graces.

Meanwhile, the search for a best friend goes badly as everyone from a fellow dealer to a long-ago school chum turns out to loathe him. Of course, quicker than you can say "predictable," you notice that Bruno would make a wonderful best buddy.

What bothers you is how Leconte has shied away from his own theme. The film supplies plenty of bumper-sticker sentiments about friendship but never gets to the bottom of what that word really means. Friendship has nothing to do with social graces or even being a good guy; it is a connection that doesn't yield easily to sit-com solutions.

In no way is Francois a worst-case scenario. Catherine is clearly a friend, for instance. Yes, he is distant and self-absorbed -- as if those were unique qualities -- but you don't see him as reprehensible. It might have been intriguing to watch a truly horrible person forced to give himself over to friendliness. Scrooge in A Christmas Carol is a good model.

Francois has a born-yesterday naivete that doesn't square with his obvious sophistication. Could such a fellow really navigate in the Parisian art and social world so cluelessly? And if he were a thief and a bastard -- which you never really see -- wouldn't he be as thick as thieves with someone?

Meanwhile, Bruno's character is designed more as a solution to another character's problem than as a flesh-and-blood personality. What is interesting though is that for all his friendliness, he is a much lonelier guy than Francois ever is.

Things come to a head toward the end, charmingly and cleverly, on the French version of the TV game show "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?" This is the show, remember, where if a know-it-all contestant such as Bruno gets stuck, he can call "a friend."

Technical credits are fine although, by Leconte standards, run-of-the-mill when it comes to visual style.

MY BEST FRIEND

Christal Films presents a Fidelite Films, TF1 Films and Lucky Red co-production

Credits:

Director: Patrice Leconte

Writers: Jerome Tonnerre, Patrice Leconte

Story by: Olivier Dazat

Producers: Olivier Delbosc, Marc Missonnier

Director of photography: Jean-Marie Dreujou

Production designer: Ivan Maussion

Costumes: Annie Perier Bertaux

Music: Xavier Demerliac

Editor: Joelle Hache.

Cast:

Francois: Daniel Auteuil

Bruno: Dany Boon

Catherine: Julie Gayet

Louise: Julie Durand

Bruno's father: Jacques Mathou

Bruno's mother: Marie Pillet

No MPAA rating

Running time -- 95 minutes

Premieres dominate Toronto's 352-film lineup

Premieres dominate Toronto's 352-film lineup
TORONTO -- The latest films from Paul Verhoeven, Ridley Scott, Anthony Minghella, Douglas McGrath and Patrice Leconte were tabbed for the red carpet treatment Tuesday as the Toronto International Film Festival released its full 352-film lineup. Festival organizers said they have booked world premieres for Minghella's Breaking and Entering, a Weinstein Co./Miramax drama about intersecting lives in London that stars Jude Law, Juliette Binoche, Robin Wright Penn and Vera Farmiga; and Scott's A Good Year, the Russell Crowe starrer about an investment banker who moves to southern France. 20th Century Fox will release the film Nov. 10. Both will receive high-profile festival sendoffs at Roy Thomson Hall, as will Leconte's comedy Mon meilleur ami (My Best Friend), starring Daniel Auteuil and Dany Boon, and Verhoeven's Zwartboek (Black Book), a Dutch-language thriller about a feisty German Jewish girl surviving World War II.

Premieres dominate Toronto's 352-film lineup

Premieres dominate Toronto's 352-film lineup
TORONTO -- The latest films from Paul Verhoeven, Ridley Scott, Anthony Minghella, Douglas McGrath and Patrice Leconte were tabbed for the red carpet treatment Tuesday as the Toronto International Film Festival released its full 352-film lineup. Festival organizers said they have booked world premieres for Minghella's Breaking and Entering, a Weinstein Co./Miramax drama about intersecting lives in London that stars Jude Law, Juliette Binoche, Robin Wright Penn and Vera Farmiga; and Scott's A Good Year, the Russell Crowe starrer about an investment banker who moves to southern France. 20th Century Fox will release the film Nov. 10. Both will receive high-profile festival sendoffs at Roy Thomson Hall, as will Leconte's comedy Mon meilleur ami (My Best Friend), starring Daniel Auteuil and Dany Boon, and Verhoeven's Zwartboek (Black Book), a Dutch-language thriller about a feisty German Jewish girl surviving World War II.

Premieres dominate Toronto's 352-film lineup

TORONTO -- The latest films from Paul Verhoeven, Ridley Scott, Anthony Minghella, Douglas McGrath and Patrice Leconte were tabbed for the red carpet treatment Tuesday as the Toronto International Film Festival released its full 352-film lineup. Festival organizers said they have booked world premieres for Minghella's Breaking and Entering, a Weinstein Co./Miramax drama about intersecting lives in London that stars Jude Law, Juliette Binoche, Robin Wright Penn and Vera Farmiga; and Scott's A Good Year, the Russell Crowe starrer about an investment banker who moves to southern France. 20th Century Fox will release the film Nov. 10. Both will receive high-profile festival sendoffs at Roy Thomson Hall, as will Leconte's comedy Mon meilleur ami (My Best Friend), starring Daniel Auteuil and Dany Boon, and Verhoeven's Zwartboek (Black Book), a Dutch-language thriller about a feisty German Jewish girl surviving World War II.

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