In the Mood for Love (2000) - News Poster

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In the Mood for Interaction: Wong Kar-wai’s Intersections

By Jacob Oller

The Hong Kong Second Wave filmmaker loves synchronicity. he films of Wong Kar-wai, specifically In the Mood for Love, are vivid portraits of desire (and often, the desire Of desire). In the Mood for Love specifically embodies this through a lyrical visual storytelling technique that creates a feeling of interfilm interaction between shots and components. […]

The article In the Mood for Interaction: Wong Kar-wai’s Intersections appeared first on Film School Rejects.
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Lust, Love and Longing: How a Hong Kong Photographer Captured Wong Kar-wai’s Cinematic Mood

Lust, Love and Longing: How a Hong Kong Photographer Captured Wong Kar-wai’s Cinematic Mood
A suited Tony Leung embracing Maggie Cheung, eyes closed and wearing that impeccably fitted floral qipao — it’s the quintessential image of romantic moodiness in Wong Kar-wai’s 2000 film In the Mood for Love. This is just one of the moments captured by famed Hong Kong artist Wing Shya, who made his name shooting on set as the legendary Chinese filmmaker’s exclusive photographer.

After 25 years in the industry, Wing just launched a limited-edition three-book box set of his work at the opening of his retrospective at the Shanghai Centre of Photography (SCoP).

“I change my direction regularly,” says Wing, who is definitely...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Afm: Philip Yung’s ‘Ambitions’ Picked up by Mei Ah (Exclusive)

Afm: Philip Yung’s ‘Ambitions’ Picked up by Mei Ah (Exclusive)
Mei Ah Entertainment has picked up rights to “Theory of Ambitions,” an upcoming Hong Kong crime thriller from “Port of Call” director Philip Yung.

The movie stars Tony Leung Chiu-wai (“The Grandmaster,” “In The Mood for Love”) and singing-acting superstar Aaron Kwok, the star of “Port,” which carried Hong Kong’s foreign-language Oscar hopes last year.

The story involves two corrupt cops, who rise to the top levels of the police force each controlling different parts of the city while simultaneously being steeped in organized crime. After initially working in perfect unison, their relationship turns to one of rivalry.

Port of Call” was an unconventional breakthrough for Yung, who wrote and directed. Based on real events involving the murder of a prostitute in 2008, and with his script revealing the killer midway through, it could not qualify as a whodunit. Rather it provided an unusual intensity and elicited a strong performance from Kwok as a disillusioned former detective
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wong Kar-Wai Talks Amazon Series ‘Tong Wars,’ Drops ‘Gucci’ Movie

  • The Playlist
Imagine having had as impeccable a cinematic run as filmmaker Wong Kar-Wai. In the ’90s up through the beginning of the aughts, the Chinese auteur delivered “As Tears Go By,” “Chungking Express,” “The Days Of Being Wild,” “Ashes Of Time,” “Fallen Angels,” “Happy Together” and, the peak of it all, “In the Mood For Love.” The unlikely mesmerizing sci-fi sequel “2046” followed in 2004, but it’s been a bumpy, uneven road since then.

Continue reading Wong Kar-Wai Talks Amazon Series ‘Tong Wars,’ Drops ‘Gucci’ Movie at The Playlist.
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Wong Kar-wai Explains His Move to Television With Amazon’s ‘Tong Wars’ and His Next Feature Film

  • Indiewire
Wong Kar-wai Explains His Move to Television With Amazon’s ‘Tong Wars’ and His Next Feature Film
Among the many filmmakers who have made the jump to television in recent years, one of the most intriguing names to join the fray is Wong Kar Wai. The Hong Kong auteur’s lyrical, romantic dramas about poetic loners — including such beloved titles as “Chungking Express” and “In the Mood for Love” — treasure texture over dense plot. So it was something of a surprise when Amazon unveiled five new series in the works in early September, including one from Wong called “Tong Wars,” described as combining the history of Chinese immigration to the U.S. with a crime potboiler and scripted by Paul Attanasio (“Quiz Show,” “Donnie Brasco”).

Details on the series were scant at the time, but in a conversation with journalists at the Lumiere Festival in Lyon, Wong explained the epic sweep of the show. “The thing that attracted me to this project was the first opportunity to
See full article at Indiewire »

Wong Kar Wai Feted at Thierry Fremaux's Lyon Lumiere Festival

Wong Kar Wai Feted at Thierry Fremaux's Lyon Lumiere Festival
The audience at this year's Lumiere Film Festival was in the mood for love, with Cannes topper Thierry Fremaux, directors Olivier Assayas and Bertrand Tavernier and actress Isabelle Adjani celebrating filmmaker Wong Kar Wai in a lavish ceremony Friday night in Lyon, France.

The ceremony was marked by emotional speeches — Assayas (who is divorced from In the Mood for Love star Maggie Cheung) called Wong “a grand poet of cinema” — and raucous routines.

Zhang Ziyi sent a video message, telling her Grandmaster director that he “should get awards everyday.”

Wong's longtime cinematographer Christopher Doyle also took the stage with...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Best Cinematography of the 21st Century: ‘Pan’s Labyrinth,’ ‘Children of Men,’ and More

  • Indiewire
The Best Cinematography of the 21st Century: ‘Pan’s Labyrinth,’ ‘Children of Men,’ and More
Here are the most visually striking movies made since 2000.

Related stories25 Films With the Best Cinematography of the 21st Century, From 'Tree of Life' to 'In the Mood for Love''Twin Peaks: The Return': Even David Lynch's Cinematographer Can't Explain What It All Means'The Mountain Between Us': How Cinematographer Mandy Walker Shot at 11,000 Feet
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Christopher Doyle Visually Dazzles, Narratively Disappoints in ‘Hong Kong Trilogy’

An often serenely meditative exploration of sociopolitical life in contemporary Hong Kong, Christopher Doyle’s Hong Kong Trilogy is a stunningly-photographed blend of documentary and fictional narrative, following real locals playing themselves. We can’t tell where real life ends and fiction begins, and ultimately, we don’t care. The film marks Doyle’s first directorial effort, crowdfunded via a Kickstarter campaign in 2014. Doyle, the self-proclaimed Keith Richards of cinematographers, is one of the most beloved and provocative DPs in the world, endowed with an exquisite eye for composition. His new film, however, meanders around for a merciful 85 minutes before fading to black, never fusing together into anything impacting, beyond a fleetingly casual interest in the characters. Other than that, we’re left with just a handful of dazzling visuals to recall, and little more.

The film is divided across three chapters. The first, titled Preschooled, follows the students of a local private school,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Wong Kar-Wai is in the Mood to Direct Crime Drama Series ‘The Tong Wars’ for Amazon

  • Slash Film
Wong Kar-Wai is in the Mood to Direct Crime Drama Series ‘The Tong Wars’ for Amazon
Wong Kar-Wai has made an indelible mark on the cinema, helming foreign film classics like In the Mood for Love and Chungking Express. But even for a well-regarded director like Wong, the grass is starting to look a little greener on the TV side. And not only TV, but TV streaming. That’s right, Wong Kar-Wai is the next auteur […]

The post Wong Kar-Wai is in the Mood to Direct Crime Drama Series ‘The Tong Wars’ for Amazon appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Seth Rogen working on adaptation of graphic novel The Boys for Amazon

  • JoBlo
So I just did a piece on In The Mood For Love's Wong Kar-Wai doing a period crime series for Amazon, and in the same article it said that Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg are directing an adaptation of Garth Ennis' dark anti-superhero graphic novel The Boys. I felt that focusing on one over the other would be burying the lead, so here we are. Either way, this is all super exciting! Meanwhile,... Read More...
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Wong Kar-Wai will direct Amazon crime series Tong Wars

  • JoBlo
Like most cinephiles, I enjoy watching international films whenever I get a chance. It's always great to get out of your comfort zone and see how other cultures make films and tell stories. One of the greatest directors right now, possibly anywhere, is Hong Kong auteur Wong Kar-Wai. His films are beautiful and lyrical, such as his oft-cited masterpiece In The Mood For Love. However, his last film was... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Wong Kar-wai to Direct Crime Drama ‘Tong Wars’ for Amazon

In the handful of years since his last feature, we’ve been teased with a variety of potential future projects from In the Mood for Love and Chungking Express director Wong Kar-wai. Most recently, there was a Gucci biopic for Annapurna and a TV series in China. Although those haven’t come to fruition yet, it looks like a new one will.

Four years ago while on the press tour for The Grandmaster, the director said, “I’ve always wanted to make a film about the Tong Wars, the rioting and the crime factions in San Francisco’s Chinatown in the early part of the last century.” Well, he’s now going to get his chance, albeit not in the initially-desired form.

Amazon Studios has announced Wong Kar-wai will direct Tong Wars, an hour-long drama series written and executive produced by Paul Attanasio (Donnie Brasco, The Good German), Variety reports.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Wong Kar-wai Directing ‘Tong Wars’ for Amazon, Because Jeff Bezos Is in the Mood for Love

  • Indiewire
Wong Kar-wai Directing ‘Tong Wars’ for Amazon, Because Jeff Bezos Is in the Mood for Love
Winter is coming…to Amazon. Variety has the details on several new series coming to the streaming platform, which is hoping to “find shows that deliver sizzle in the water-cooler environs of social media and can travel around the world” in much the same way that “Game of Thrones” does. The most exciting of these projects is “Tong Wars,” which will be directed by Wong Kar-wai.

Read More:Lush New Video Essay Compares ‘Moonlight’ With the Masterworks of Wong Kar-Wai — Watch

Beloved by cinephiles for such films as “In the Mood for Love” and “Chungking Express,” the Hong Kong helmer is the latest world-renowned auteur to try his hand at small-screen drama. The period piece will be written by Paul Attanasio (“Quiz Show,” “Donnie Brasco”) and, according to Amazon Studios chief Roy Price, is “a very compelling show.” It’s also described as “a prime example of a period piece that
See full article at Indiewire »

Wong Kar-wai Directing ‘Tong Wars’ for Amazon, Because Jeff Bezos Is in the Mood for Love

Wong Kar-wai Directing ‘Tong Wars’ for Amazon, Because Jeff Bezos Is in the Mood for Love
Winter is coming…to Amazon. Variety has the details on several new series coming to the streaming platform, which is hoping to “find shows that deliver sizzle in the water-cooler environs of social media and can travel around the world” in much the same way that “Game of Thrones” does. The most exciting of these projects is “Tong Wars,” which will be directed by Wong Kar-wai.

Read More:Lush New Video Essay Compares ‘Moonlight’ With the Masterworks of Wong Kar-Wai — Watch

Beloved by cinephiles for such films as “In the Mood for Love” and “Chungking Express,” the Hong Kong helmer is the latest world-renowned auteur to try his hand at small-screen drama. The period piece will be written by Paul Attanasio (“Quiz Show,” “Donnie Brasco”) and, according to Amazon Studios chief Roy Price, is “a very compelling show.” It’s also described as “a prime example of a period piece that
See full article at Indiewire Television »

China Abuzz Over Local Talent Invited to Join Academy

China Abuzz Over Local Talent Invited to Join Academy
Chinese media were abuzz Thursday over the record number of Chinese filmmakers and actors who have been invited to become new members of the Academy, with some commentators saying that it could boost the country’s chances of winning an Oscar.

But others said that the Academy’s decision to include more Chinese and Asian faces was an effort to boost diversity rather than a bow by Hollywood to China, and that the new Chinese additions would have a negligible impact on Chinese films’ Oscar prospects.

Fourteen industry heavyweights from mainland China and Hong Kong are among the 774 new invited members. The news made headlines throughout Greater China.

“China raves over record number of Chinese filmmakers to join the Academy,” one headline declared.

The 10 invitees from Hong Kong are actresses Maggie Cheung (“In the Mood for Love”) and Carina Lau (“Days of Being Wild”); actors Tony Leung (“In the Mood for Love”) and Donnie Yen (“Ip Man
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 25 Best Sexy Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ to ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Sexy Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ to ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’
It’s no secret that sex sells, and movies are no exception. But while plenty of films like to show gratuitous sex, they’re not always very good. That’s a problem, since movies have the power to shape not only the cultural norms, but personal ones. And what could be more personal than sex? Sexuality is an integral part of the human experience, not some sensational or shameful ploy to sell tickets (though it doesn’t hurt).

That’s why we think it’s important to single out the very best films that also happen to be incredibly sexy, titillating, and provocative. These are not only some of our favorite films in general, but they’re films that celebrate the broad spectrum of human sexuality while telling stories as cinematic as they are personal. Some don’t have any sex scenes at all, while some are notoriously near-pornographic. When these movies do show sex it is always in service of the story, and always in order to challenge, subvert, or celebrate contemporary beliefs about sexuality.

Turn on (and get turned on) by our list of the 25 best sexy movies of the 21st century (well, so far). You know you want to.

25. “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (2008)

Undeniably sexy and amusing at once, Woody Allen’s 2008 Spain-set dramedy delights in pushing its various players into all sorts of romantic permutations and configurations. Anchored by Scarlett Johansson in a sneaky performance as the eponymous Cristina (pre-breakout Rebecca Hall is her best pal Vicky), the film follows a pair of friends as they meet and make lots of love with the beguiling Juan Antonio (Javier Bardem), who isn’t at all thrown off by the possibility of having two lovely ladies in his bed. In fact, he’s got another one to think about too, his free-spirited ex-wife (Penelope Cruz), who he just can’t get out of his head (or heart). On the surface, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” is a dead sexy romp about free-wheeling love-makers (complete with plenty of naughty bits), but it’s also a film that boldly explores issues of fluidity and fidelity with an uncharacteristically easy touch. -Ke

24. “Shortbus” (2006)

With its three-person blowjob circle, non-simulated sex scenes including ejaculation, and close-up of a pee stream unleashing into a bathtub, “Shortbus” is not for everyone. It’s an ambitious film, one that attempts to have fun, be sexy, and tell a good story. If anyone could pull it off, it would be the man behind “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” John Cameron Mitchell. “Shortbus” feels as much like an ensemble comedy as a playful experiment, though the two main characters are a sex therapist who’s never had an orgasm and a retired gay sex worker experimenting with opening up his relationship. With their partners, they both begin attending a weekly artist and sex salon, each hoping inspiration will strike. Mitchell wanted to use sex in new cinematic ways, “because it’s too interesting to be left to porn.” If it’s interesting sex you want, “Shortbus” has got it. -Jd

23. “Brokeback Mountain” (2005)

The end of this film is so movingly profound that your memory of it might not be that it was all that sexy. The love between these two men, buried under their rugged cowboy exteriors, ends with what can only be described as a sense of life-defining tragedy. Yet it is those brief moments where they let themselves go and unleash their animalistic passion, which “Crouching Tiger” director Ang Lee captures in his normal visceral fashion, that add a level of eroticism and physically affection that nearly makes all the pain worth it. Ennis and Jack rotate from almost fighting, as they pull at each others’ denim-clad exterior, to moments of being naked and incredibly tender. It’s virtually every cowboy fantasy rolled up into one. That they can only be themselves in the privacy of the great outdoors makes everything that much more liberating. Watching this film in 2005 felt taboo and rebellious, which resulted in a charged atmosphere in packed mainstream cineplexes around the country. -Co

22. “In the Cut” (2003)

Jane Campion’s handle on female desire has always been one of her best attributes as a director (and she’s got a lot of them), but nothing in her filmography is as overtly sexy and emotionally challenging as her 2003 Meg Ryan-starrer “In the Cut” (and that includes “The Piano,” which has a sexiness and eroticism all its own). Our first introduction to Ryan’s character is rooted in her coming to heady terms with her own sexuality, a theme that carries over throughout the often grisly drama. Increasingly drawn to Mark Ruffalo as a moody detective looking to solve a local murder that Frannie is tangentially involved in, Ryan’s character pushes the boundaries of “acceptable” desire. It’s a theme that Campion giddily plays into with some of modern cinema’s most satisfying and profound sex scenes, many of which center on — gasp — Frannie’s own pleasure over that of Ruffalo’s character. -Ke

21. “Hustle & Flow” (2005)

Craig Brewer’s crowdpleaser about a pimp dreaming of music fame is anchored by strong performances from Terrence Howard, Taraji P. Henson, and Taryn Manning. Howard plays Djay, while Henson and Manning are Shug and Nola, two of his girls. Hot-tempered and passionate, Djay begins making tracks with his friend Key (Anthony Anderson), and discovers he has a gift for lyrics. The catchy original soundtrack helps sell the story, as Djay’s songs seem to actually have a chance at getting radio play. While the strip club setting provides ample shots of semi-nude women, Djay and Shug’s sweet romance gives the film its emotional core and shows a softer side to Djay (and his temper). Their undeniable chemistry leads the previously timid Shug to throw down a sexy hook, her raspy croon on “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” making Henson’s star power glaringly obvious. -Jd

20. “Beyond the Lights” (2014)

Chemistry is the name of the game in Gina Prince-Bythewood’s freight-train fast music industry romance, which pairs up rising starlet Gugu Mbatha-Raw (pure charm) alongside pre-“Birth of a Nation” Nate Parker. The pair exhibit major fireworks from the start, imagining Mbatha-Raw as hot new pop star Noni Jean, a big talent who is dangerously close to burning out and fading away, before she falls into the protective arms Parker’s do-gooder cop, Kaz Nicol. Prince-Bythewood’s film cannily sneaks in big questions about fame and the entertainment industry, along with issues regarding what’s actually sexy (Noni Jean is frequently kitted out in teensy costumes that make record execs happy, while diminishing her own humanity with every stitch), deep issues that are lovingly cradled by full-scale love story. When the pair finally give into their obvious attraction, “Beyond the Lights” pulls out the big guns, all gauzy love scenes and one particularly hot trip to Mexico, but the film maintains its sensuality by remembering that nothing is so sexy as mutual respect and admiration. -Ke

19. “In the Mood for Love” (2000)

Every Wong Kar-wai movie contains a kind of visual sensuality in every frame, but “In the Mood for Love” goes one step further — its slow-burning romance between a pair of would-be lovers who live across the hall from each other in sixties-era Hong Kong is rich with unobtainable desire. Much is left unsaid and unachieved about the fantasy of an extramarital affair shared by Chow Mo-wan (Tony Leung) and Su Li-zhen (Maggie Cheung), but the hints of attraction between them, unfolding in small gestures and passing glances, imbues each scene with the intensity of emotions specific to a period of repression. It’s a grand tragedy of issed opportunities framed by erotic implications. —Eric Kohn

18. “Ex Machina” (2014)

If you like high-tech voyeurism and intellectual sparring, you might find Alex Garland’s cerebral sci-fi thriller unearthing some hidden desires. An affable young programmer, Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson), is invited to the secluded jungle home of the CEO of his company, Nathan (Oscar Isaac) to participate in a top-secret experiment. Nathan wants to know if the cyborg he has been developing, Ava (Alicia Vikander) can convince Caleb that she has real consciousness. The tension is ripe between Nathan and Caleb as each attempts to alternately impress and control the other, but it is Caleb’s obsession with saving Ava that raises questions about the hero myth. Ava is the embodiment of male fantasy, trapped within a body invented to please and serve. As the two men fight over who best understands her mind, it turns out Ava was pulling the strings all along. There’s nothing sexier than a woman in charge. -Jd

17. “Quills” (2000)

It’s easy enough to get sucked into “Quills” based on the promise of Joaquin Phoenix playing an earnest (and incredibly sexy) young priest tempted by his attraction to a chambermaid. But somehow, much like Kate Winslet’s Madeline, we fall under the spell of the charismatic Geoffrey Rush, who plays his role as the Marquis de Sade with a deliciously dirty panache befitting the notorious French writer. The Marquis’ libertine ways run counter to the no-nonsense Royer-Collard (Michael Caine), who takes over the asylum with the intention of stifling the writer’s creative output. But even his own wife is no match for the words of the Marquis, which ooze both sensuality and liberty. Before long, any initial apprehension to the Marquis de Sade (he is a dirty old man, after all) is fully given over to the hope that his debauchery will win out, and that his desire, as well as that of Madeline and Coulmier (Phoenix) will be fully fulfilled — even though we know this is impossible. -Jr

16. “A Bigger Splash” (2015)

Watching “A Bigger Splash” feels like observing a sizzling chess game of attraction. Luca Guadagnino sticks Ralph Fiennes, Tilda Swinton, Matthias Schoenaerts, and Dakota Johnson on the world’s most gorgeous island and lets the sparks fly. Swinton plays a world-famous rock singer vacationing with her lover, a chiseled Schoenaerts who is practically a walking and talking sculpture of male beauty. Their time together is disrupted by the arrival of the rocker’s former lover and his daughter, a promiscuous young 22-year-old. Each character is so ready to succumb to sexual desire and so pent up with sexual attraction that Guadagnino creates the ultimate emotional orgy. The fun is in seeing how each person uses their sexuality to outsmart the next. You’ll be seduced from the first frame to the last. It feels like you’re watching each actor for the very first time. -Zs

On the next page: wild adventures in Florida, some of the century’s most jaw-dropping pairings, and at least one murder.

Related storiesAbdellatif Kechiche is Auctioning Off 'Blue is the Warmest Color' Palme d'Or to Finance New FilmNetflix's New Ratings System Is a Terrible Idea13 Essential Lgbt Indies From the Post-'Brokeback Mountain' Era
See full article at Indiewire »

Wong Kar-wai to Receive 2017 Lumiere Award

Wong Kar-wai to Receive 2017 Lumiere Award
Paris – Chinese filmmaker Wong Kar-wai will receive the Lumiere Award at the 9th edition of the heritage film festival set in Lyon, France, following in the footsteps of Martin Scorsese and Catherine Deneuve.

Run by French director Bertrand Tavernier and Cannes artistic chief Thierry Fremaux, the festival said it was paying tribute to Wong for “his unclassifiable films, each with countless flares of beauty, for the trace he is leaving upon cinema history, for all that is glorious and lingering in his work, for the neon lights of Hong Kong and the snows of Manchuria, and because, after all, dark glasses” – Wong’s trademark look – “are undeniably classy.”

The festival, organized by Lyon’s Institut Lumiere, added that Wong’s films, which include “Happy Together” and “Chungking Express,” have “reached beyond the circle of moviegoers and critics, attracting a public drawn to his search for the aesthetic and poetic.”

Wong
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Barry Jenkins’ ‘Moonlight’: See the Seven Foreign Films That Inspired the Oscar Winner

  • Indiewire
Barry Jenkins’ ‘Moonlight’: See the Seven Foreign Films That Inspired the Oscar Winner
Editor’s Note: This article is presented in partnership with FilmStruck. The exclusive streaming home for The Criterion Collection, FilmStruck features the largest streaming library of contemporary and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films as well as extensive bonus content, filmmaker interviews and rare footage. Learn more here.

There are so many remarkable things about the success of Barry Jenkins’ “Moonlight,” a Best Picture winner that was a low-budget indie, featured gay protagonists, and was directed by an African American. Yet for all of its boundary breaking, the most radical thing about “Moonlight” often goes unnoticed: Jenkins is the first major, American Academy Award-winning director whose film lineage is distinctly non-American.

Auteurs like Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola – and the generation of filmmakers who walked in their footsteps – were heavily influenced by European art cinema, but defined their careers by striking a balance between Hollywood traditions and arthouse freedoms.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes: Vis a Vis Program Showcases China’s Arrival in Global Cinema

Cannes: Vis a Vis Program Showcases China’s Arrival in Global Cinema
A tribute to cinematographer Chris Doyle on Friday night in Cannes will bring to a close the first edition of China Vis a Vis. A new Chinese cultural outreach program, it has run the duration of the Cannes Film Festival.

Doyle, an Australian former sailor who has been based in Hong Kong for decades and was the close collaborator of Wong Kar-wai on many films, is a clever choice for Vis a Vis. As well as being an iconic director of photography with credits that include Wong’s “In the Mood for Love” and Zhang Yimou’s “Hero,” Doyle is a gifted, idiosyncratic artist who also puts on art installations and photographic shows, and is an occasional movie director himself.

Doyle directed “Hong Kong Trilogy,” a film set within Occupy Central, the failed 2014 Hong Kong pro-democracy movement which collapsed under pressure from the mainland Chinese government. But Vis a Vis organizers – ticketing firm Weying Technology,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Handover Hangover: Hong Kong’s Film Industry Faces an Uncertain Future

Handover Hangover: Hong Kong’s Film Industry Faces an Uncertain Future
When China took over Hong Kong’s sovereignty from Britain in 1997, the former British colony was promised “50 years unchanged” under the framework of “one country, two systems.”

Twenty years on, a lot has changed, including Hong Kong cinema.

At the turn of the 20th anniversary of the handover, Hong Kong cinema is at a crossroad. Filmmakers are facing questions concerning the future of the city’s film industry, which was once known to the world as “Hollywood East.”

“We must think about how Hong Kong cinema should position itself in order to find our way to the future,” says Wong Chun, the 28-year-old director of Hong Kong drama “Mad World,” which won the new director prize at last year’s Golden Horse Film awards in Taiwan and Hong Kong Film Awards this year. “What is our strength, as compared to films from other Asian countries? It’s time to reflect on this.
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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