7.6/10
66,562
171 user 87 critic

The Fisher King (1991)

A former radio DJ, suicidally despondent because of a terrible mistake he made, finds redemption in helping a deranged homeless man who was an unwitting victim of that mistake.

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ON DISC
Won 1 Oscar. Another 13 wins & 27 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Adam Bryant ...
Radio Engineer
Paul Lombardi ...
Radio Engineer
...
Lou Rosen (as David Pierce)
...
Limo Bum
...
Sondra
Warren Olney ...
TV Anchorman
Frazer Smith ...
News Reporter
...
...
Crazed Video Customer
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Sitcom Actor Ben Starr
...
Sitcom Wife
James Remini ...
Bum at Hotel
Mark Bowden ...
Doorman
John Ottavino ...
Father at Hotel
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Storyline

After hearing a popular DJ rail against yuppies, a madman carries out a massacre in a popular New York bar. Dejected and remorseful, the DJ strikes up a friendship with Parry, a former professor who became unhinged and then homeless after witnessing his wife's violent death in the bar shooting. The DJ seeks redemption by helping Parry in his quest to recover an item that he believes is the Holy Grail and to win the heart of the woman he loves. Written by Jim Sanders and Determined Copy Editor

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A good, old-fashioned story of guilt, poverty, love, madness and free video club membership. (vv) See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Fantasy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

27 September 1991 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Fisher King  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$24,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$41,895,491 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Howard Stern was asked for tapes of his radio show. Howard refused and instead asked to be a consultant since they were modeling the character after him. The studio did not want to pay Stern, so they declined and in return Stern told them he wasn't interested in giving them his tapes. See more »

Goofs

(at around 1 min) When Jack is talking to Parry in the basement, Pinocchio's head (on left) changes position 3 times each time the scene cuts back to Jack. See more »

Quotes

Lydia: How much?
Jack Lucas: Well, you're a store member, so we could probably...
Anne Napolitano: [firmly] Forty bucks.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in And the Oscar Goes To... (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Lydia The Tattooed Lady
Written by E.Y. Harburg & Harold Arlen
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Movie with depth
14 June 2001 | by (Midnight Movie Land) – See all my reviews

The movie's plot has been discussed enough, no need to rehash it here. I just wanted to add a few observations. In my opinion this is one of Robin Williams' best performances. I know that at the time he was heavily involved in Comic Releif and this story about mentally ill homeless men and acceptance of all types of people really fits the PC Comic Releif mentality, but he really did a great job here, portraying Parry, a man lost in fantasies of knights and ladies.

Jeff Bridges is very Howard Stern-like as Jack Lucas, the insulated, rude talk show host. In 1991 Stern was still a New York thing, but being that his "fame" has since spread, we see who the character was based on with a little more clarity now.

Michael Jeter as the homeless, depressed former cabaret singer was a delight in every scene he was featured in. His "singing telegram" scene to Lydia in her office was a classic.

Mercedes Ruehl also stood out as sort of living outside this crazy world that Jack Lucas finds himself thrust into. Her home is a haven and scenes shot there are usually scenes of a return to normalcy in the story, a grounding.

David Hyde Pierce has pretty much found his niche as the asexual, slightly fey character. This was basically a toned-down Niles Crane in a hat here.

Amazing movie. Like other Terry Gilliam movies, they unwind like dreams and have the look of otherworldliness. I am sorry that the homeless people arent giddy and uplifting enough for some viewers, but in reality it is a pretty stark existance.

Recommended highly.


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