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The Three Musketeers (1973)

A young swordsman comes to Paris and faces villains, romance, adventure and intrigue with three Musketeer friends.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)
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ON DISC
Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 3 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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King Louis XIII (as Jean Pierre Cassel)
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Georges Wilson ...
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Storyline

The young D'Artagnan arrives in Paris with dreams of becoming a king's musketeer. He meets and quarrels with three men, Athos, Porthos, and Aramis, each of whom challenges him to a duel. D'Artagnan finds out they are musketeers and is invited to join them in their efforts to oppose Cardinal Richelieu, who wishes to increase his already considerable power over the king. D'Artagnan must also juggle affairs with the charming Constance Bonancieux and the passionate Lady De Winter, a secret agent for the cardinal. Written by Eric Sorensen <Eric_Sorensen@fc.mcps.k12.md.us>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

. . . One for All and All for Fun!

Genres:

Action | Adventure

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

29 March 1974 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Three Musketeers  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The sets were closed and the European press didn't like it one bit. But Richard Lester was concerned about having his ideas stolen as four other adaptations of the book were also in production at the time (two Italian, one French and one animated). See more »

Goofs

When M. Bonancieux is in the Bastille and a torturer places a hot rock for him to unknowingly sit on, it is placed in a bowl in a close up but in all the long shots, it is on a flat plate. See more »

Quotes

D'Artagnan: Oh, My - my darling, forgive me. I, uh, my lord, what can I say? I - I love her, and I was jealous.
Duke of Buckingham: A perfectly excellent reason for attacking a stranger in the dark. Would you oblige me in a small matter sir?
D'Artagnan: Anything, my Lord.
Duke of Buckingham: Madam and I are going to the palace. We must not be seen. If anyone should try to follow us, would you be good enough to kill him? Thank you.
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Connections

Referenced in Stealth (2005) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Like wine, gets better with age
11 November 2004 | by (New Jersey) – See all my reviews

Watching this and its 'sequel' only confirms the tragedy of Oliver Reed's flirtation with the bottle, and he is just one of the wonderful cast. What is especially impressive to me is that with so much scenery available to be chewed, none of the cost set their teeth to it but act in as an ensemble.

This and "Four" represent a Victorian telling of the tale in a theater: dauntless heroes, villains that can be freely hissed and heroines worth taking up the sword to defend, and by the time Lady deWinter has strangled Constance at the end of the second part and is sent to her death, and Rochefort is vanquised, the heroes appear on stage again in the wonderful coda.

Lester creates a dirty, brawling world complete with cows, sheep, pigs and men with dirt and filth on their clothes. The dandies are on the side of wrong; those who sprawl in the mud are the good guys. Yes, it bears similarity to Hard Days Night, but Lester was more than that, as anyone who has seen Petulia will agree.

George Macdonald Fraser, who wrote the script, also created the Flashman books. In the same years as the Musketeers, there was also Royal Flash, a film I have not seen in ages.


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