Peter Sarsgaard - News Poster

News

Is Errol Morris’s ‘Wormwood’ a Documentary? Netflix Says Yes, Oscars Say No

Errol Morris has been ahead of the curve ever since he broke out with pet cemetery documentary “Gates of Heaven” in 1978. A decade later, “The Thin Blue Line” wowed critics but alienated the hidebound documentary community with its use of “reenactments” and a rousing Philip Glass score. Decades before Netflix created “Making a Murderer,” “The Keepers,” and “Witness,” Morris’ film actually solved a murder mystery and freed an innocent Death Row convict in a Texas prison.

Since then, Glass became a go-to movie composer, earning three Oscar nominations — and could score a fourth for this year’s Oscar documentary frontrunner “Jane.” Reenactments have become standard issue for nonfiction films, filling the void between talking heads, archival footage, cinéma vérité observation, and what isn’t visually available. And Morris isn’t the only filmmaker who is a presence in his films, yelling at his subjects from behind his invention, the Interrotron.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Is Errol Morris’s ‘Wormwood’ a Documentary? Netflix Says Yes, Oscars Say No

  • Indiewire
Errol Morris has been ahead of the curve ever since he broke out with pet cemetery documentary “Gates of Heaven” in 1978. A decade later, “The Thin Blue Line” wowed critics but alienated the hidebound documentary community with its use of “reenactments” and a rousing Philip Glass score. Decades before Netflix created “Making a Murderer,” “The Keepers,” and “Witness,” Morris’ film actually solved a murder mystery and freed an innocent Death Row convict in a Texas prison.

Since then, Glass became a go-to movie composer, earning three Oscar nominations — and could score a fourth for this year’s Oscar documentary frontrunner “Jane.” Reenactments have become standard issue for nonfiction films, filling the void between talking heads, archival footage, cinéma vérité observation, and what isn’t visually available. And Morris isn’t the only filmmaker who is a presence in his films, yelling at his subjects from behind his invention, the Interrotron.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Looming Tower, Hard Sun: Hulu Announces New Series to Debut in New Year

  • TVSeriesFinale
Wintertime, and the streaming is easy.... Hulu has announced the release dates for two new TV series: The Looming Tower and Hard Sun. Based on Lawrence Wright's non-fiction book, The Looming Tower TV show explores the lead-up to the terrorist attacks which struck the U.S. on September 11, 2001. The scripted drama stars Jeff Daniels, Tahar Rahim, Peter Sarsgaard, Bill Camp, Virginia Kull, Louis Cancelmi, Ella Rae Peck, Sullivan Jones, Wrenn Schmidt, Michael Stuhlbarg, and Alec Baldwin. The Looming Tower season one, premieres on Hulu on Wednesday, February 28, 2017. Airing on BBC One in UK, the Hard Sun TV show comes from Luther creator Neil Cross. The Hulu crime drama follows detectives Robert Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Elaine Renko (Agyness Deyn) who are just trying to put up with one another and do their jobs,
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Annette Bening Set for Museum of the Moving Image Salute, Willem Dafoe Named Sbiff Cinema Vanguard, and Many More

  • Indiewire
Annette Bening Set for Museum of the Moving Image Salute, Willem Dafoe Named Sbiff Cinema Vanguard, and Many More
As awards season takes over Hollywood, keep up with all the ins, outs, and big accolades with our bi-weekly Awards Roundup column.

Annette Bening will be honored by Museum of the Moving Image at its 31st annual Salute on December 13 in New York. The news was announced by Michael Barker and Ivan L. Lustig, Co-Chairmen of the Museum’s Board of Trustees. The evening will feature cocktails, dinner, and an award presentation, featuring clips from Bening’s career introduced by her friends and colleagues.

Barker said in an official statement, “On screen, stage, and television, Annette Bening is one of America’s finest living actresses. From her Broadway debut in Tina Howe’s ‘Coastal Disturbances’ to her emotionally complex performance last year in ’20th Century Women’ and now as movie star Gloria Grahame in the upcoming ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,’ her stunning range as an actress has always been staggering and uncompromising.
See full article at Indiewire »

Pathway To Paris Celebrates Successful Carnegie Hall Concert For Climate Action

Pathway to Paris gave voice to the urgent issue of climate change on Sunday night at Carnegie Hall, celebrating the launch of its 1,000 Cities initiative and the organization’s three years of environmental advocacy.

Patti Smith and Flea perform on stage during Pathway To Paris Concert For Climate Action at Carnegie Hall

Credit/Copyright: Kevin Kane/Getty Images for Undp

Founded by Jesse Paris Smith and Rebecca Foon, Pathway to Paris orchestrated the event in partnership with the Un Development Programme and 350 org – bringing together a collection of artists, activists, academics, musicians, politicians, and innovators to shine a light on 1,000 Cities’ imperative mission, supported by a Care2 petition which invites the world’s cities to transition off of fossil fuels in a call to action.

The evening opened with powerful speeches and performances by Jesse Paris Smith and Rebecca Foon, who curated the event, encapsulating the essence of Pathway to Paris.
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’

  • Indiewire
Doc NYC 2017: 13 Films We Can’t Wait to See At the Festival, From ‘EuroTrump’ to ‘David Bowie: The Last Five Years’
New York City’s annual Doc NYC festival kicks off this week, including a full-to-bursting slate of some of this year’s most remarkable documentaries. If you’ve been looking to beef up on your documentary consumption, Doc NYC is the perfect chance to check out a wide variety of some of the year’s best fact-based features. Ahead, we pick out 14 of our most anticipated films from the fest, including some awards contenders, a handful of buzzy debuts, and a number of festival favorites. Take a look and start filling up your schedule now.

Doc NYC runs November 9 – 16 in New York City.

EuroTrump

Donald Trump may seem like a sui generis figure, a one-of-a-kind monster who was forged in a perfect storm of racism, tweets, and chaos, but history suggests that he’s really just a new breed of an old type. You don’t even have to look
See full article at Indiewire »

Critics Choice Documentary Awards Crown ‘Jane’ As Winner, While Filmmakers Grapple With ‘Fucked-Up Times’

  • Indiewire
Critics Choice Documentary Awards Crown ‘Jane’ As Winner, While Filmmakers Grapple With ‘Fucked-Up Times’
The Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards returned to Brooklyn’s Bric on Nov. 2 and anointed Brett Morgen’s “Jane” the Oscar frontrunner for Best Documentary Feature. That bodes well for the Jane Goodall profile as it continues its awards season run. Presented by the Broadcast Film Critics Association and the Broadcast Television Journalists Association, the inaugural ceremony last year correctly augured that “O.J.: Made in America” and “13th” would win that season’s top documentary film and television prizes.

When the 2017 nominees were unveiled this October, so was a rule change that merged the Best Documentary categories for films released in theaters versus via television or a streaming platform. This meant that the latest field was extremely stacked — 16 titles — making the win for a feature on the Tanzania expeditions of beloved, now-octogenarian primatologist Dame Jane Goodall extra fortuitous. “Jane” premiered this fall at the Toronto Film Festival, earning an A- from IndieWire.
See full article at Indiewire »

First Look at Keanu Reeves and Winona Ryder in Destination Wedding

  • MovieWeb
First Look at Keanu Reeves and Winona Ryder in Destination Wedding
Bloom has released the first-look image of Keanu Reeves and Academy Award Nominee Winona Ryder in Victor Levin's Destination Wedding. This romantic comedy was first announced at the end of August, marking the fourth collaboration for Keanu Reeves and Winona Ryder. They first appeared on screen together in the divisive 1992 movie Bram Stoker's Dracula, before reuniting in 2006 with the Philip K. Dick adaptation A Scanner Darkly and 2009's The Private Lives of Pippa Lee. As you can see in this photo, their characters Frank and Lindsay seem to be getting along well, chatting over some wine, but that wasn't always the case.

Destination Wedding tells the story of two miserable and unpleasant wedding guests, both pariahs at this affair, who develop a mutual affection despite themselves. But to act on those feelings would be to trust hope over experience, a foolish choice indeed. Over the course of the weekend and against all odds,
See full article at MovieWeb »

AFI Fest Adds Galas: ‘Call Me by Your Name,’ ‘The Disaster Artist,’ and ‘Hostiles’

  • Indiewire
AFI Fest Adds Galas: ‘Call Me by Your Name,’ ‘The Disaster Artist,’ and ‘Hostiles’
Call Me by Your Name,” “The Disaster Artist,” and “Hostiles” will serve as the Centerpiece Galas at AFI Fest (November 9–16), the season’s last major film festival. In addition, documentarian Errol Morris will be the subject of a November 11 Tribute following a screening of “Wormwood,” his six-part, semi-scripted Netflix series (out December 15) that stars Peter Sarsgaard as a son investigating his father’s death.

Morris, 69, previously won the Best Documentary Feature Oscar in 2004 for “The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara.” He’s hoping for similar luck in 2018: Variety reports that Netflix is submitting a separate, theatrical version to The Academy for award consideration in multiple categories.

Related:afi Fest 2017 Announces Indie Additions, Including ‘Bodied,’ ‘Mr. Roosevelt,’ ‘Thoroughbreds,’ and Many More

Of the three newly-announced Centerpieces, Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me by Your Name” has had the longest festival run —it premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January,
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars: Netflix and Errol Morris Defy Convention With Hybrid Doc ‘Wormwood’

Oscars: Netflix and Errol Morris Defy Convention With Hybrid Doc ‘Wormwood’
Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker Errol Morris has “run afoul” of the film Academy before, he jokes. After all, his unconventional 1988 cinematic investigation “The Thin Blue Line” apparently violated unspoken dogma within the documentary community that year, yielding one of the most egregious snubs in Oscar history.

Nevertheless, he’s ready to test the organization’s boundaries once again this year, and he’s found an apt partner in a trailblazing platform that’s no stranger to upsetting industry status quo.

Netflix will release Morris’ “Wormwood” as a four-hour, six-part event on the streaming site on Dec. 15. But following the series’ world premiere at the Telluride Film Festival in September, the director has prepared a non-episodic theatrical version with a single intermission, Variety has learned. Netflix plans to submit that version to the film Academy, and not only for documentary feature consideration, but for all other categories as well.

That in and of itself is not uncommon. But what makes
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Detective Thriller ‘The Zero’ Adds Matt Rager to Adapt

Passage Pictures’ movie version of Jess Walter’s detective thriller “The Zero” is gaining momentum with Matt Rager on board to adapt, Variety has learned exclusively.

Veteran producer Uri Singer picked up rights to “The Zero” in August to produce through Passage. Singer’s credits include two Michael Almereyda films — “The Experimenter,” which starred Winona Ryder and Peter Sarsgaard, and the recently released “Marjorie Prime,” starring Lois Smith, Geena Davis, and Jon Hamm.

The Zero,” a finalist for the National Book Award, centers on a cop who wakes up to find he’s shot himself in the head in a city and a country shuddering through the aftershocks of a devastating terrorist attack. As the smoke slowly clears, he finds that his memory is skipping, lurching between moments of lucidity and days when he doesn’t seem to be living his own life at all.

Singer said, “‘The Zero’ paints a moving character portrait of loss, trauma
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Peter Sarsgaard Tackles LSD, CIA Mind-Control and Political Dissent in 'Wormwood'

In 1953 bacteriologist Frank Olson plunged to his death from a hotel window after being unknowingly dosed with LSD by the CIA. The headline-grabbing story seemed sinister enough until a decades-long investigation revealed that the actual truth behind his death might be something much more nefarious: a government-order execution to get rid of a political liability.

Peter Sarsgaard brings the last days of Olson’s life to light in the new Errol Morris miniseries Wormwood, a 258-minute odyssey that is one part detective story and one part a history of government deception. The period flashbacks are contrasted with present-day interviews with...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Chappaquiddick’

Toronto Film Review: ‘Chappaquiddick’
Over the years, a great many actors have taken a turn at playing one of the Kennedy brothers (in made-for-tv movies, on “Saturday Night Live,” in big-screen historical dramas). The vast majority of these performances have been mediocre, a handful have been quite good, and a few have been memorable — like Bruce Greenwood’s cuttingly terse and commanding JFK in the Cuban Missile Crisis drama “Thirteen Days,” or Peter Sarsgaard’s tender and battle-scarred Robert F. Kennedy in “Jackie.” To that short list of singular and superb Kennedy performances, we can now add the Australian actor Jason Clarke’s portrayal of Edward M. Kennedy in “Chappaquiddick.”

Clarke, with a bit of makeup, looks the part to an astonishing degree: the squint, the hawkish profile, the wedge of hair combed gently over from the left side, the lips that hang slightly open as if pondering a question, giving Kennedy an aura that’s more tentative, less
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Why Maggie Gyllenhaal Fought for a Producer Role on 'The Deuce' (Q&A)

The Deuce, HBO's drama about the birth of the porn industry in 1970s New York. It wasn't until she met with creators David Simon and George Pelecanos, of The Wire fame, that the mom of two (with husband Peter Sarsgaard) began to see herself playing the prostitute Candy. What ultimately sealed the deal for Gyllenhaal, 39, was becoming a producer on the series (debuting Sept. 10). "I...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Venice Film Review: Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem in ‘Loving Pablo’

Venice Film Review: Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem in ‘Loving Pablo’
For interested viewers who attempted the first two seasons of Netflix’s celebrated cartel drama “Narcos” but felt it lacked a crucial touch of telenovela, “Loving Pablo” should do the trick in just over two hours. Long, loud and lurid, with a distinct whiff of week-old quesito colombiano, Fernando Leon de Aranoa’s pulpy Pablo Escobar biopic promises an alternative spin on familiar material by taking the perspective of the drug kingpin’s glamorous journalist lover Virginia Vallejo. Yet she turns out to be as stock a presence as anyone else in this blood-spattered chunk of cartoon history, which reduces her life and Escobar’s alike to bullet points punctuated by bullet holes, strung together by her excessive, over-explanatory narration. The enlivening presence of Spanish cinema’s real-life first couple, Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem, in the leads gives “Loving Pablo” a clear international selling point, though both are colorfully slumming it.

“Colombians
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: Peter Sarsgaard Stars In Netflix’s ‘Wormwood,’ a Documentary-Fiction Combo You’ve Never Experienced Before

  • Indiewire
Review: Peter Sarsgaard Stars In Netflix’s ‘Wormwood,’ a Documentary-Fiction Combo You’ve Never Experienced Before
Errol Morris has built a career around eccentric real-life figures, from pet cemetery managers to executioners, but in recent years his track record has been spotty. His portrait of photographer Elsa Dorfman (“The B-Side”) and a two-hour interrogation session with Donald Rumsfeld (“The Unknown Known”) weren’t duds so much as routine efforts from a filmmaker who excels at peculiar investigations into the whims of human behavior. As if making up for missed time, Morris pairs one of his best subjects in years with his most ambitious work to date, “Wormwood,” a six-part Netflix miniseries that screened in its entirety at the Telluride Film Festival in advance of its December premiere on the platform.

While much of Morris’ sensibilities comes through in this sprawling tale of government cover-ups and idiosyncratic loners, it’s also a radical break from the dense, interview-driven approach that has distinguished his movies for decades. Gone is the patented Interrotron,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Darkest Hour’ Review: Gary Oldman Makes Joe Wright’s Biopic as Rousing and Ferocious as Winston Churchill Was Himself

  • Indiewire
‘Darkest Hour’ Review: Gary Oldman Makes Joe Wright’s Biopic as Rousing and Ferocious as Winston Churchill Was Himself
An electric chamber piece that couldn’t more perfectly complement “Dunkirk” if Christopher Nolan wrote it, “Darkest Hour” is as rousing and ferocious as Winston Churchill was himself. It’s also a hell of a lot more controlled. Unfolding with the clockwork precision of a Broadway play — director Joe Wright has always been at his best when he’s at his most theatrical — this tightly coiled retelling of Churchill’s first days in office is more than (yet another) passionate appeal to our collective goodness; it’s a deliciously unsubtle testament to the power of words and their infinite capacity to inspire.

That the film arrives at a time when words seem to have lost all their value only makes it that much more persuasive.

Hardly the first time that Wright has fetishized the sway of language and its ability to shape history (“Atonement” was so lost in letters that
See full article at Indiewire »

Saoirse Ronan Scores Her Greatest Role In Greta Gerwig’s Winning Directorial Debut ‘Lady Bird’ — Review

  • Indiewire
Saoirse Ronan Scores Her Greatest Role In Greta Gerwig’s Winning Directorial Debut ‘Lady Bird’ — Review
In “Lady Bird,” an angst-riddled teen copes with her restrictive Catholic high school, bickers with her doting parents, endures her first heartbreak, and dreams of escaping to a far-off place. There’s nothing fresh about that premise, but writer-director Greta Gerwig’s semi-biographical riff on her Sacramento upbringing elevates it to a new wavelength beaming with wit and insight. Anchored by Saoirse Ronan in a spunky lead role that registers as her very best, the movie confirms that Gerwig’s plucky screen presence translates into a richly confident filmmaking voice.

Lady Bird” is both snarky and sincere — a touching, markedly feminine ode to growing up that never takes its familiarity for granted. Gerwig earns the ability to make this rite-of-passage saga her own.

Read More:Why Telluride Matters In Awards Season — IndieWire’s Movie Podcast (Screen Talk Episode 163)

“The only thing exciting about 2002 is that it’s a palindrome,” moans Christine McPherson,
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Telluride Matters In Awards Season — IndieWire’s Movie Podcast (Screen Talk Episode 163)

  • Indiewire
Why Telluride Matters In Awards Season — IndieWire’s Movie Podcast (Screen Talk Episode 163)
The Telluride Film Festival may take place in a quaint mountain town, but its influence extends far beyond that. As the 2017 edition takes off, films ranging from “Downsizing” to “The Shape of Water” are vying for attention at the start of awards season. So what makes this festival so influential in the midst of a crowded festival circuit? In this week’s episode of Screen Talk, Eric Kohn and Anne Thompson find each other in Telluride to chat about the festival buzz and why it matters.

Listen to the full episode below.

Screen Talk is available on iTunes.

You can subscribe here or via RSS. Share your feedback with Thompson and Kohn on Twitter or sound off in the comments. Browse previous installments here, review the show on and be sure to let us know if you’d like to hear the hosts address specific issues in upcoming editions of Screen Talk.
See full article at Indiewire »

Errol Morris on ‘Alternative Facts,’ CIA Coverups and His New Netflix Series ‘Wormwood’

Errol Morris on ‘Alternative Facts,’ CIA Coverups and His New Netflix Series ‘Wormwood’
Errol Morris, the Oscar-winning director of “The Thin Blue Line” and “The Fog of War,” is back with the most formally daring project of his career, “Wormwood.”

The six-part Netflix miniseries defies easy categorization. It is equal parts documentary and narrative drama — a dazzlingly original dive into the mysterious death of Frank Olson, a CIA employee who plunged out of a New York City hotel window in 1953 after unwittingly being dosed with LSD. The binge-able series follows Olson’s son, Eric, as he tries to piece together what happened to his father, interspersing interviews with dramatic scenes acted out by the likes of Peter Sarsgaard and Molly Parker. It makes a compelling case that the spy agency, which later apologized for drugging Olson, also had him murdered and spent decades covering up its crime.

Wormwood” debuted Friday at the Telluride Film Festival. Before touching down in Colorado, Morris spoke with Variety about his passion for truth-finding, the
See full article at Variety - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites