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Signs of the Times: Inside 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri'

Signs of the Times: Inside 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri'
Martin McDonagh can't recall exactly where he was when he first saw the signs. The 47-year-old award-winning playwright and filmmaker thinks it might have been Florida. Maybe it was Georgia. Or possibly Alabama or even Mississippi; the bus he was on hit all of them on its route, so he can't be 100-percent sure. Back in the late Nineties and the mid-aughts, McDonagh always liked to take cars or trains or buses when he had to get from one place to the next in the U.S., if time allowed; having grown up in London,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

On my radar: Toby Jones’s cultural highlights

The actor on Dragons’ Den, the jazz improvisations of Brad Mehldau, the Cinema Museum, a south London bus garage, and more…

Born in Hammersmith, London, Toby Jones studied at the University of Manchester and at the École Internationale de Théâtre Jacques Lecoq in Paris. He has starred in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011), Berberian Sound Studio (2012) and Dad’s Army (2016); he also appears in The Hunger Games and voiced Dobby the house elf in the Harry Potter film series. He won an Olivier award for best supporting actor in The Play What I Wrote (Wyndham’s theatre, 2001) and was nominated for Critics’ Choice, Golden Globe and Emmy awards for playing Alfred Hitchcock in the television film The Girl (2012). Toby Jones stars in indie thriller Kaleidoscope (out now), Michael Haneke’s Happy End (1 December), and The Birthday Party at the Harold Pinter theatre (from 9 January 2018).

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

On my radar: Rupert Grint’s cultural highlights

The actor on Jez Butterworth’s The Ferryman, David Shrigley’s unsettling cartoons, designing T-shirts online and getting his dad into RuPaul’s Drag Race

Born in Harlow in 1988 and raised in Hertfordshire, Rupert Grint rose to fame after being cast as Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter film series – the world’s second-highest grossing movie franchise – at the age of 11, alongside Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson. Outside the Potter world, his film roles include Driving Lessons (2006), Wild Target (2010), and Postman Pat (2014). He made his stage debut in Mojo at the Harold Pinter theatre, London, in 2013. He has recently starred in Snatch (2017), a TV adaptation of Guy Ritchie’s film of the same name, and will star alongside Nick Frost in new TV comedy Sick Note, launching on Sky 1 and streaming service Now TV on 7 November.

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

On my radar: Rupert Grint’s cultural highlights

The actor on Jez Butterworth’s The Ferryman, David Shrigley’s unsettling cartoons, designing T-shirts online and getting his dad into RuPaul’s Drag Race

Born in Harlow in 1988 and raised in Hertfordshire, Rupert Grint rose to fame after being cast as Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter film series – the world’s second-highest grossing movie franchise – at the age of 11, alongside Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson. Outside the Potter world, his film roles include Driving Lessons (2006), Wild Target (2010), and Postman Pat (2014). He made his stage debut in Mojo at the Harold Pinter theatre, London, in 2013. He has recently starred in Snatch (2017), a TV adaptation of Guy Ritchie’s film of the same name, and will star alongside Nick Frost in new TV comedy Sick Note, launching on Sky 1 and streaming service Now TV on 7 November.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Red Dwarf: creating the pop culture of the future

Andrew Moir Oct 26, 2017

Andrew takes a nerdy dive into the pop culture real and fictional that's made its way into the world of Red Dwarf...

Creating culture within science-fiction can be tricky. It’s potentially alienating, with the audience required to understand allusions without a reference point. Then again, if you throw in too many contemporary references, the future starts to look dated pretty quickly. Red Dwarf has walked that fine line, building its own stars and entertainment but chucking in the familiar, just to keep the world grounded. We take a look at humanity’s future culture as seen through the eyes of Lister, Rimmer, Cat, Kryten and Holly.

See related Gunpowder episode 1 review Amazon Prime UK: what’s new in October 2017? New on Netflix UK: what's added in October 2017? Music

Red Dwarf set out its fictional musical world early on with the opening scenes of the first episode
See full article at Den of Geek »

William Friedkin Says Hollywood Has Been ‘Reduced to Blockbusters’

  • Indiewire
William Friedkin Says Hollywood Has Been ‘Reduced to Blockbusters’
Decades have passed since William Friedkin directed box office hits “The Exorcist” and “The French Connection,” but the 81-year-old filmmaker isn’t exactly pining for a return to the commercial arena. “In America, I would not want to be an active filmmaker now,” he told an audience at the Lumiere Festival in Lyon on Thursday, shortly after delivering a masterclass at the classic film festival. “When I started, there were greater opportunities to make many different films in America. Now, it’s reduced to blockbusters, with very few exceptions.”

Appropriately, he was making that assertion in an introduction to a 4k screening of his under-appreciated 1977 masterpiece “Sorcerer,” a meticulous thriller that famously got buried by “Star Wars” when it hit theaters just one month after George Lucas’ sci-fi phenomenon. Friedkin’s Paramount production — a reimagining of Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1953 “The Wages of Fear,” adapted from the same novel — involves a
See full article at Indiewire »

Michael Bay’s 451 Media Group launching 9 graphic novels at New York Comic Con

Michael Bay’s 451 Media Group is set to debut nine brand new graphic novels at the New York Comic Con this week, which come from acclaimed creators such as George Pelecanos (The Deuce), Rob Cohen (The Fast and the Furious) and Scott Rosenberg (Con Air). Check out the titles here…

Bad Moon Rising – A wild smash up of The Wolfman and Sons of Anarchy from writer/producer Scott Rosenberg (Con Air, Gone in 60 Seconds, Jumanji 2, Welcome to the Jungle, and the CBS series Zoo).

ExMortis – An epic WWII action adventure from the minds of Paul + Pete Williams, VFX gurus behind Avatar, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, and Chronicles of Narnia.

Humbug – A masterly plotted merry and manic mash-up of Sherlock Holmes and Ghostbusters from A.J. Gentile, the writers and creators of Micronauts and Visionaries.

Nvrlnd – From the creative minds of the writing team, Stephanie Salyers and
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – Cute Little Buggers (2017)

  • Flickeringmyth
Cute Little Buggers, 2017.

Directed by Tony Jopia.

Starring Caroline Munro, Honey Holmes, Gary Martin, and Dani Thompson.

Synopsis:

A quaint English festival is rudely interrupted by curious outsiders, criminals, tourists and bloody terror from beyond the stars, as aliens seeking to repopulate their dying race unleash a terrifying and monstrous creature upon the locals – the rabbit.

Those expecting an introspective film examining the complexities of life in rural England since the Brexit vote, or hoping for a deep complex drama about the troubled relationship between a son and his estranged father, might want to look elsewhere. Cute Little Buggers is exactly the kind of film you think it is. An unpretentious, gloriously silly and cheesy love letter to the B-movies of the past. It just isn’t a very good one.

Let’s get my verdict of the film out of the way early shall we? This film is bad.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Kristin Scott Thomas on ‘Darkest Hour’ and Rediscovering Her Love of Film

Kristin Scott Thomas on ‘Darkest Hour’ and Rediscovering Her Love of Film
This seating simply won’t do.

Kristin Scott Thomas, the Oscar-nominated actress, has just plunged into an oversized chair that threatens to completely envelop her slight, 5 foot 6 frame. With a slightly imperious air, she insists we relocate to a sectional couch a few steps away to talk about why she left Hollywood, her on-and-off love affair with the movie business, and “The Darkest Hour,” the film that’s brought her back into the spotlight.

“The Darkest Hour,” the story of the war cabinet crisis that threatened Winston Churchill’s prime ministry in the early days of World War II, is Gary Oldman’s show. He’s already considered to be the favorite to bag a best actor Oscar, but Scott Thomas should not be overlooked. In a few key scenes she etches a fully lived in portrait of Clementine Churchill, Winston’s wife and emotional ballast during those troubled times.

“It was a partnership,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Emoji Movie's Patrick Stewart on switching it up to voice a character called Poop

  • Cineplex
The Emoji Movie's Patrick Stewart on switching it up to voice a character called Poop The Emoji Movie's Patrick Stewart on switching it up to voice a character called Poop Bob Strauss - Cineplex Magazine7/25/2017 9:28:00 Am

Verily, is there an English actor more worthy of respect than Sir Patrick Stewart?

The distinguished Shakespearean, birthed in Yorkshire in 1940, has wowed on the stage his whole career and continues to do so, most recently in a production of Harold Pinter’s No Man’s Land that he and his buddy Ian McKellen mounted on Broadway and then brought across the pond to London.

Before that, his portrayal of cerebral starship captain Jean-Luc Picard in "Star Trek: The Next Generation" was a major factor in ensuring the longevity of one of pop culture’s greatest science-fiction franchises.

Speaking of franchises, the X-Men movies, which set the template for this century’s superhero genre,
See full article at Cineplex »

John Heyman, Distinguished Financier and Producer, Dies at 84

Film producer and financier John Heyman, who founded influential British agency International Artists and the World Group Companies, died Friday in New York, his family told Variety via statement. He was 84.

John Heyman passed away in his sleep today, Friday the 9th of June,” the statement read.

His son, David Heyman, is the producer of the Harry Potter films, among many others.

Heyman’s World Film Sales pioneered the foreign pre-sales of films on a territory by territory basis.

John Heyman produced films including “The Go-Between” (1971), family sci-fi film “D.A.R.Y.L.” (1985) and “The Jesus Film” (1979). He was also an uncredited executive producer on David Lean’s 1984 E.M. Forster adaptation “A Passage to India.”

Over the course of his career he arranged financing of more than $3 billion to co-finance films including “Awakenings” and “The Odessa File” (at Columbia), “Edward Scissorhands,” “Home Alone” and “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” (Fox), “Victor/Victoria” and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Last Tycoon’ Trailer: Matt Bomer Serves Don Draper & Jay Gatsby, Drips With Old Hollywood Charm — Watch

‘The Last Tycoon’ Trailer: Matt Bomer Serves Don Draper & Jay Gatsby, Drips With Old Hollywood Charm — Watch
Show business — is there any other? Not for Monroe Stahr and Pat Brady, the warring producers at the center of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1933 novel, “The Last Tycoon,” now a major motion picture series from the folks over at Amazon Prime.

Read More: 3 Key Questions for Indie Filmmakers Building a Career in the Age of Netflix and Amazon

Dreamy Matt Bomer and slick Kelsey Grammer play the two moguls vying for power and influence in 1930’s Hollywood. Stahr is the young hot shot; Brady his risk-averse mentor. Lily Collins, soon appearing in Bong Joon Ho’s “Okja,” plays Brady’s daughter, Celia, an aspiring producer herself. The trailer plays up the drama and intrigue, as the two men battle over Celia’s interests even as she is intent on forging her own path. Indie darling Rosemarie Dewitt makes a shining appearance as Brady’s scorned wife, and ’80s icon Jennifer Beals
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘The Last Tycoon’ Trailer: Matt Bomer Serves Don Draper & Jay Gatsby, Drips With Old Hollywood Charm — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘The Last Tycoon’ Trailer: Matt Bomer Serves Don Draper & Jay Gatsby, Drips With Old Hollywood Charm — Watch
Show business — is there any other? Not for Monroe Stahr and Pat Brady, the warring producers at the center of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1933 novel, “The Last Tycoon,” now a major motion picture series from the folks over at Amazon Prime.

Read More: 3 Key Questions for Indie Filmmakers Building a Career in the Age of Netflix and Amazon

Dreamy Matt Bomer and slick Kelsey Grammer play the two moguls vying for power and influence in 1930’s Hollywood. Stahr is the young hot shot; Brady his risk-averse mentor. Lily Collins, soon appearing in Bong Joon Ho’s “Okja,” plays Brady’s daughter, Celia, an aspiring producer herself. The trailer plays up the drama and intrigue, as the two men battle over Celia’s interests even as she is intent on forging her own path. Indie darling Rosemarie Dewitt makes a shining appearance as Brady’s scorned wife, and ’80s icon Jennifer Beals
See full article at Indiewire »

The Handmaid’s Tale, Donnie Darko and The Mephisto Waltz: Jim Hemphill’s Home Video Picks

Last month saw the premiere of Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale, a television adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s 1985 novel documenting a future America in which women are oppressed by religious fundamentalists. The series has been garnering a lot of attention and acclaim, but it isn’t the first time filmmakers have tried their hands at Atwood’s dystopian classic; German director Volker Schlöndorff, working from a script by Harold Pinter, brought the book to the screen in 1990. His version of the story was considerably less well received at the time than Hulu’s, but it’s a compelling, distinctive film – one in which […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Absolutely Fabulous’ Star Joanna Lumley to Receive BAFTA Fellowship

‘Absolutely Fabulous’ Star Joanna Lumley to Receive BAFTA Fellowship
Joanna Lumley is to receive the BAFTA Fellowship, the British Academy’s highest honor. The “Absolutely Fabulous” actress will receive special career award, which is given to an individual in recognition of their outstanding and exceptional contribution to film, television or games, at this year’s British Academy Television Awards on May 14.

BAFTA chair Jane Lush said Lumley, who has been nominated six times for a BAFTA, winning twice in 1993 and 1995 for “Absolutely Fabulous,” was a “true icon of television.”

The actress joins her “Absolutely Fabulous” co-star Jennifer Saunders (pictured with Lumley at the premiere for last year’s “Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie), who was awarded the BAFTA Fellowship in 2009. Other television Fellows include David Attenborough, Michael Palin, Ken Loach, Harold Pinter, Maggie Smith and Julie Walters.

Lumley said the award was the “grandest and most unexpected prize I have ever had the joy of receiving.” “Nothing could make me prouder or happier than being awarded this
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Video Essay. Friedkin's Endings

  • MUBI
Where to begin with William Friedkin? Our title would suggest at the end. But really this video essay stems from the beginning—rather, from the early biography of this most idiosyncratic of mainstream directors. In fast and short Chicago-l.A. documentaries about stuntmen, lion-tamers, and death-row inmates, Friedkin cultivated a taste for action and physicality. His first film, The People vs. Paul Crump (1962), recreates from the ground up the bank job that the titular inmate took the fall for, a precursor to the present-tense quality of Friedkin’s later, more famous movies; while The Bold Men (1965) is a forgotten television special about tough-guy characters sticking out their necks for their own glory. (The latter was sourced from real life by Friedkin after a producer handed him just the proposed title and offered him a tiny budget to shoot it on.) By the time he was celebrated—or derided—for terse
See full article at MUBI »

Christopher Morahan obituary | Michael Billington

Director and producer whose 60-year career spanned television, theatre and film – from The Jewel in the Crown to Pinter plays

In an age when it is fashionable for directors to be regarded as auteurs, Christopher Morahan, who has died aged 87, was a supreme craftsman. In a rich 60-year-long career, he proved equally at home in television, theatre and film and worked with many of the best writers, including Harold Pinter, Michael Frayn and Simon Gray. But he will be best remembered for two TV landmarks: John Hopkins’ quartet of plays, Talking to a Stranger (1966), and the 14-part series The Jewel in the Crown (1984), on which he was producer and co-director. His death coincided with that of his friend Tim Pigott-Smith, who starred in Granada’s epic series about India.

It was Morahan’s decision to shoot that series on film, to use archive footage to provide historical perspective and to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Trials and Tribulations: The Art of Adapting Kafka

Should all adaptations of classic works be faithful?

In an interview with the BBC’s Hew Wheldon, Orson Welles set out his philosophy concerning adaptation, more specifically, his willingness to interpret and alter source material:

Wheldon: Do you have any compunction about changing a masterpiece?Welles: Not at all, because film is quite a different medium. Film should not be a fully illustrated, all-talking, all-moving version of a printed work, but should be itself, a thing of itself. In that way it uses a novel in the same way a playwright might use a novel — as a jumping off point from which he will create a complete new work. So no, I have no compunction about changing a book. If you take a serious view of filmmaking, you have to consider that films are not an illustration or an interpretation of a work, but quite as worthwhile as the original.

The
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Tony Haygarth obituary

Distinctive supporting actor on television, stage and film

Tony Haygarth, who has died aged 72, was a salt-of-the-earth Liverpudlian actor who became a familiar face on television in series such as Emmerdale (in which he played Mick Naylor), The Bill and New Tricks, while sustaining a reputation as one of Britain’s most distinctive, and reliable, supporting actors on the main national stages.

In the mid-1990s this reputation became a little more serious when he won Equity’s Clarence Derwent award for his performance as a compromised racetrack commissioner in Sam Shepard’s Simpatico, a wonderful series of duologues in junk towns on the freeway running from Los Angeles to the desert, at the Royal Court; and secured an Olivier award nomination for his magnificent performance as the blustery redneck Juror No 3 in Harold Pinter’s West End revival of Twelve Angry Men.

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Patrick Stewart interview: Logan, X-Men, Donald Trump

Ryan Lambie Feb 28, 2017

Again reprising his role as Charles Xavier in Logan, Sir Patrick Stewart talks to us about its making and the relevance of its themes...

Mild spoilers for Logan lie ahead (but nothing that's not in the promos)

See related  David Fincher's unfinished projects Looking back at David Fincher's Alien 3 House Of Cards season 5: everything we know so far

Violent and spectacularly bloody though Logan is, it's also unusually introspective and melancholy for a superhero movie. There are plenty of chases and action scenes, but director and co-writer James Mangold creates space for quiet character moments - the kind of thing you might find in a classic western or road-trip movie, or maybe even a play like Harold Pinter's No Man's Land, which - as we'll see shortly - has a close connection to one of Logan's stars.

Perhaps this is why
See full article at Den of Geek »
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